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Readings and Nominations > Nominations for April 2016

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message 1: by Marie (last edited Mar 05, 2016 02:14AM) (new)

Marie Williams | 713 comments Mod
Our theme for April will be classic Science Fiction. After three months of War and Peace, I thought we all might appreciate something a little lighter and quicker to read. Suggestions are below for a starting point. Anything is welcome, but should be suitable to a one month schedule.

Jules Verne
20000 Leagues Under the Sea
Journey to the Center of the Earth

HG Wells
The Time Machine
The War of the Worlds
The Invisible Man

Ray Bradbury
Fahrenheit 451

H P Lovecraft
The Case of Charles Dexter Ward
At the Mountains of Madness

Mary Shelley
Frankenstein
The Last Man

Robert Louis Stevenson
The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde



message 2: by Marie (new)

Marie Williams | 713 comments Mod
I do think if we were to choose Frankenstein, it should be a double reading with Dr Jekyll, since they share similar themes.


message 3: by Susan (new)

Susan Catalano (susancatalano) | 1 comments I would like to read Ray Bradbury's Fahrenheit 451, but I don't think I've read Dr. Jekyll, so that would be a good choice too. It's a tough list to choose from!


Linda Abhors the New GR Design | 531 comments Marie wrote: "I do think if we were to choose Frankenstein, it should be a double reading with Dr Jekyll, since they share similar themes."

Love that idea! I think I've read 30% of these at some time or another, but some of them would be nice to re-read. Sadly, I tried Verne's "Mysterious Island", to read a copy which I found in an antiques shop a long time ago.....was kind of bored by it.
Also, just because I live where I live, Lovecraft is a cool idea, too. Have the complete works, but haven't read it yet.


message 5: by QNPoohBear (last edited Mar 05, 2016 03:52PM) (new)

QNPoohBear | 470 comments I'd be up for Jules Verne or H.G. Wells. I'm not into Lovecraft despite the fact that he loved Providence. I've read Frankenstein and Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde and I believe Fahrenheit 451 was a summer reading assignment when I was in high school.


message 6: by Sara (new)

Sara (phantomswife) Fahrenheit 451 is on my challenge list, so OK with me.
I would join with Frankenstein and Dr. Jekyll. Not a big fan of Lovecraft.


message 7: by Erik (last edited Mar 06, 2016 06:14PM) (new)

Erik (airxx) | 127 comments A nice selection list @Marie

While partial to Lovecraft, I doubt this is a crowd pleaser and will pass on it.

I'd say Bradbury then... it has been a long while (High School for me too). I've read everything on the list except "The Last Man", but can't imagine this story being better than Bradbury's.


message 8: by Marie (last edited Mar 07, 2016 09:45PM) (new)

Marie Williams | 713 comments Mod
Apologies everyone, I had my wireless company changed, and it has been unreliable at best. They had to come fix it today, because I couldn't keep a connection for more than a few minutes.

So, yes to Farenheit 451, and Frankenstein/Dr Jekyll. I've had a couple of messages in support of Verne but no specific title, so I'll choose 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea if that's all right with everyone. I haven't read Jules Verne, but at least I'm familiar with it from the film.

I've read Frankenstein/Dr Jekyll but I'm happy to read them again. Farenheit 451 was a school project for me too, but the only thing I remember about it is having my wisdom teeth out. I heard a partial reading of Charles Dexter Ward at Hammond Castle in Massachusetts years ago, but never finished it. I liked it, but can see why they're an acquired taste.


Andrea AKA Catsos Person (catsosperson) | 127 comments Marie, I haven't read "Farenheit 451" before but I have read "Frankenstein, Dr Jeckyll, and 20,00 Leagues.


message 10: by QNPoohBear (new)

QNPoohBear | 470 comments Frankenstein is a tough read if all you know is the silly movies. I hate that pop culture has turned Mary Shelley's "creature" into a "monster." They miss the point of the story.

All I remember from Fahrenheit 451 is burning of the books and virtual reality. We also read Brave New World in high school. I think my teachers were paranoid about the emerging digital age.


message 11: by Sara (new)

Sara (phantomswife) I agree that Frankenstein is an important read that has been ruined by pop culture. It has been a long time since I read it and I would be more than willing to go again. I don't think I have ever read Dr. Jekyll and I will be interested in seeing how that differs from the popular culture version of it.


Linda Abhors the New GR Design | 531 comments QNPoohBear wrote: "Frankenstein is a tough read if all you know is the silly movies. I hate that pop culture has turned Mary Shelley's "creature" into a "monster." They miss the point of the story.

All I remember f..."


Perhaps rightly so....some of them are probably still trying to figure out how to open email.


message 13: by Erik (new)

Erik (airxx) | 127 comments "Quiet! Quiet I say... or you will be writing 500 sentences using the word 'persnickety' properly! "

Ah, the memories of writing 'chrysanthemum' 500 times too... (cursed the English teacher the whole time! )

Sorry... school flashbacks.

I can read any of the above again. I reread most all my books multiple times anyhow, and always find something new I missed the first time through.


message 14: by Marie (last edited Mar 08, 2016 04:03PM) (new)

Marie Williams | 713 comments Mod
Am I the only one that actually liked Brave New World? I didn't mention Huxley, Orwell, etc. because I had a dystopian month planned later. I included Fahrenheit here because Bradbury overall was a sci-fi author, and it would suit either one.

The new Victor Frankenstein with James MacAvoy and Daniel Radcliffe was good. It wasn't a faithful adaptation, and went a little steampunk, but it focuses more on Victor's obsession told through Igor's experience. The creature is only shown for a few minutes near the end, more to show Victor the reality of what he's done. I do like the the classic version, and Kenneth Branagh's, but more for movies than book adaptations. And to be honest, the real story that inspired Mary Shelley is a lot more interesting than her book.

Oh, the poll is already up if anyone wants to go ahead and vote.


message 15: by Katie-bree (new)

Katie-bree | 9 comments Marie wrote: "Our theme for April will be classic Science Fiction. After three months of War and Peace, I thought we all might appreciate something a little lighter and quicker to read. Suggestions are below for..."
Hello all! I know I have been absent for a long time but I'm back and vote Farenheit 451 or Time machine please! I've never read them but would love to! :))


message 16: by Marie (new)

Marie Williams | 713 comments Mod
Katie-bree wrote: "Marie wrote: "Our theme for April will be classic Science Fiction. After three months of War and Peace, I thought we all might appreciate something a little lighter and quicker to read. Suggestions..."

Hi you! I was going to sit down and email you this weekend and see how you've been and how business is going. It's good to see you back. The poll is up on the bottom of the front page, you've got until March 21, to decide.


message 17: by QNPoohBear (new)

QNPoohBear | 470 comments I liked the idea of heroine t-shirts, and really wanted this one when Think Geek offered it, but didn't like the depiction of the creature in this shirt.

ended up with Ada Lovelace (right) though I hate math.



message 18: by Erik (new)

Erik (airxx) | 127 comments I like the "Curie" ; admittedly I'm biased since I work with curies every day.


message 19: by Marie (new)

Marie Williams | 713 comments Mod
I think the design of the Curie is best overall, but I definitely agree, the creature looks more like a robot than the monster from the story.

Side note: I haven't had internet access in a couple of days. Apparently when I switched companies, the box they sent was faulty, which is why I haven't been able to keep a connection in the last week or so. They had to had to overnight a new box, and I got it installed last night. So far everything is working well, so I'm going to try and get everything caught up on here today.


Andrea AKA Catsos Person (catsosperson) | 127 comments Sorry to hear that your change of ISP was a pain!

What a nuisance!


message 21: by Marie (new)

Marie Williams | 713 comments Mod
Andrea (Catsos Person) is a Compulsive eBook Hoarder wrote: "Sorry to hear that your change of ISP was a pain!

What a nuisance!"


Thanks, Andrea :) So frustrating! sighs champagne problems...


message 22: by Erik (new)

Erik (airxx) | 127 comments Lol! I was thinking similar thoughts... only in America can the loss of internet feel like not eating for a week.

I had a pizza arrive "cold" yesterday, and I was angry and ranted a little. A story came on the TV about some of the starving Syrians trapped in a city by the hostilities, and I shut up and microwaved my pizza just a tad chagrined.


message 23: by Sara (new)

Sara (phantomswife) Sometimes hard to remember that our problems would seem like nothing to our grandparents. Mine had to bring water into the house from a well and had an outdoor toilet. I'm pretty sure they would not sympathize with most of the things I complain about.


message 24: by Marie (last edited Mar 14, 2016 11:39PM) (new)

Marie Williams | 713 comments Mod
For some it could be more than an inconvenience, though. When I was still actively working in interiors, not having reliable Internet access for a couple of weeks would have been an issue. I can't imagine how it would be for someone who required the internet to work from home daily. I don't mind lack of internet for a few days, I'm actually a pretty big Luddite in real life, but the complete lack of customer service over the issue or employees that actually know how to handle a situation or who to transfer you to, is beyond frustrating.

Also, we currently have a week left to vote, and a tie in the poll even with votes that have been messaged to me. If it isn't broken soon, I'll end the poll early, and we'll have a tiebreaker vote.


Linda Abhors the New GR Design | 531 comments Sara wrote: "Sometimes hard to remember that our problems would seem like nothing to our grandparents. Mine had to bring water into the house from a well and had an outdoor toilet. I'm pretty sure they would no..."

I lived that for a few days every fall, when we'd go to my grandmother's trailer. It was "Fun"....well, for my deer-hunting brothers and my dad. Still remember dumping an old biscuit can with tons of toy soldiers (which I really didn't want to play with), cowboys and Indians (cool, because you could change up their horses) and train cars. All tiny plastic things. Not much else to do there.


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