Small Government Book Fan Club discussion

False Flag
This topic is about False Flag
15 views
Self-Promo: Books and Blogs > The Speculative Fiction Cantina

Comments Showing 1-16 of 16 (16 new)    post a comment »
dateDown arrow    newest »

message 1: by Henry (new) - added it

Henry Brown (machinetrooper) | 236 comments Just finished a podcast interview with S. Evan Townsend and Bruno De Marquis. I'm sure it's obvious why I'm a writer and not a public speaker, but still kinda' fun.

http://www.blogtalkradio.com/writestr...


message 2: by Marina (new)

Marina Fontaine (marina_fontaine) | 1445 comments Mod
Cool! I'm scheduled for some time in early May. This format sounds terrifying, though.


message 3: by Henry (new) - added it

Henry Brown (machinetrooper) | 236 comments Sharing time with another author you mean?


message 4: by Marina (new)

Marina Fontaine (marina_fontaine) | 1445 comments Mod
That, and the fact that it's so highly structured, with very limited time to get your points in. I have to say, you sound so relaxed on the radio, like you're having a great time.

BTW, "Fiction for Men" reminds me of SPIKE TV's slogan: "Movies for guys who like movies!" But for the record, plenty of women love to read "manly" fiction. (Obviously, or it would not sell at all since guys do tend to slack off in the reading department :) Kind of a vicious circle there, but getting broken a bit by self-pub plus a few high profile authors like Andrew Klavan who are making an effort to bring boys into reading.)

Come to think of it, I should probably blog about that.

Anyway, I'll finish listening to the show over the weekend. Sounds great so far.


message 5: by Henry (new) - added it

Henry Brown (machinetrooper) | 236 comments Wow--you remember "Movies For Guys Who Like Movies!" When I first started blogging I kept thinking of that, and trying to dream up some equivalent phrase for books.

Never did, obviously.

I did rather enjoy it (I have an interest in the subject matter, after all), and wish there was more time. But I was trying not to hog all the time and shortchange my co-guest.

After listening to it all the "um, uh, y'know"s surprised me, as I didn't realize I was saying them. English is Bruno's second language, but he might have done a better job than me rolling the words out.


message 6: by Henry (new) - added it

Henry Brown (machinetrooper) | 236 comments If/when you do blog about that, please let me know.


message 7: by Troy (new)

Troy Grice (troyjgrice) | 41 comments Hi All,

Below is a draft excerpt from my upcoming sequel to Indivisible.

Set more than a year after the dollar collapse and domestic insurgency, two factions battle for DC supremacy.

The executive branch and treasury department want to shore up the dollar with a parallel currency called the...wait for it... the "amero". The intend to nationalize the federal reserve and convert all the debt to perpetuities at 0% interest (a technical default). They also must slash spending which includes a 70% reduction in military spending.

The joint chiefs of staff, the dept of defense, and the bankers have other ideas.

The scene is aboard Air Force One which has become a sort of flying bunker for the president. On board, Maiden Lane, assistant to the treasury secretary, is having an affair with David Forteson, the heir to the Forteson family fortune and chairman of Sepulcorp, the world's largest defense contractor...

Forteson took another pull and exhaled. Mae watched the blue smoke undulate in the golden glow of the diode light. "I need to know if I can trust you."

"Of course you can trust me."

"...Because if I know that I can trust you then I can make things very good for you."

"Yes, you can trust me."

"Good."

Forteson took another long drag, exhaled, and stared upwards in contemplation. The corners of his mouth formed into a grin.

"Well?" Mae asked.

Forteson's face broke into a full smile. "I'm going to be the vice president."

Well, that was easy, Mae thought to herself. "Really?" she asked out loud.

"You don't sound all that surprised."

"I'm excited for you, but I'm not surprised because I already knew that Clancy was out."

"Makes sense. T tells you everything."

"When?" Mae asked.

"Days. Hours, maybe."

"Does Vanessa have something picked out for your swearing-in ceremony?"

"I haven't told her, yet."

"Ooh, now I feel special – you telling me before telling your wife."

Forteson took another pull on his cigarette.

"So why you? Why not some pliable establishment guy – a senator or a governor?"

"Because the Joint Chiefs of Staff need a strong voice advising the president. They thought I was a good fit."

"They're not advising him already?"

Forteson exhaled slowly. "They are." He turned his head and looked into Mae's eyes. "But the joint chiefs are one heartbeat away from losing control."

"So you're an insurance policy?"

"Clancy has other ideas, ideas that don't align with our plan. If I'm in, then there is no risk of a change in course." Mae wrapped her leg around the future vice president. Forteson continued. "You don't need T to tell you how dire things are. There's talk of a breakup, of a DC fire sale. Selling off most of the federal assets. Slashing the military two thirds. Mothballing four aircraft carriers. It's like we've become the Soviet Union – the last days of empire. Morale is at its nadir. The currency is ruined. Doc controls a quarter of the country. We have one last chance to put it all back together, to make America great again."

"And you are a key part of it?"

"I'm in the circle of trust, my family, the other key families."

"What's the plan?"

Forteson sighed, reached over and stubbed out his cigarette, then lit another. "There was a banking panic in 1907. Know anything about it?"

"Not much. My education didn't stretch back any rather than 1929."

"It was a transformative moment, an unparalleled crisis. Markets crashed. The New York banks got squeezed, mercilessly by the fucking sheep. People pulled their savings out. The banks collapsed. The contagion spread. The entire economic system hung in the balance."

"But then the Federal Reserve was created to save the day."

"That was later. The families stepped in and bailed the banks out. The Morgans. the Rockefellers, the Fortesons, the Rothschilds, they invested their own fortunes to save the system, to save America."

"I imagine they had to."

"You don't understand, Mae. Had they not done what they did, everything would be different. The Fed was their payback. Congress, Wilson, they gifted it to the families in exchange for saving the system. America, as it is presently constructed, would not exist without the Fed. This country would be a federation of squabbling states with, trapped in the 19th Century while the rest of the world marched on. Who financed the expansion of Washington DC? The Fed did. Who financed social security, the bailouts, the economic booms, the military? Fuck, we'd probably all be speaking German right now, if not for the families."

"So they're coming in to save us again?"

"Yes. But it's so much bigger now. The families don't have enough. Everything they have is invested in the Fed. It has to be saved. But the families are over-leveraged. they don't have enough. Their wealth is tied up in the banking system, in the debts owed to them by the U.S. government. A hard default would be the end of them. The banks, the trusts, the multinationals, the military industrial complexes...they would be destroyed. Millions of sheep would suffer. It has to be preserved and rebuilt." Forteson took another long drag and exhaled. He looked into Mae's eyes, again. "I'm not a fool. I know you are close to T, but his plan is in opposition to what the families want. It's very important that you not tell him or anyone about this. If this leaks out, it could get bloody. No one want to lose. The stakes are too high. The Joint Chiefs don't want a bloody coup. Coups are damaging to a nation's prestige. Can I trust you? It's only for a few days. Then you can tell whomever you please."

Mae smiled. "Yes. You can trust me."


message 8: by John (new)

John | 59 comments Marina wrote: " ...since guys do tend to slack off in the reading department..."

Marina, I noted the sarcasm font (or the fact that you softened that sexist slur/stereotype with a smiley) :), but I wondered if indeed one gender or the other is the target demographic for, essentially, ALL fiction? (No, I'm NOT serious about my "complaint" in the first clause, but I'm truly serious about my question. I could spend some time Googling the subject, but since I'm a guy, and thus not much of a reader (HA!), it occurred to me that maybe you've already seen the stats and can enlighten me.)


message 9: by Henry (new) - added it

Henry Brown (machinetrooper) | 236 comments Marina may have more specific info, but yes, women are the targeted market across all genres, which is why all tradpubbed (and most indie) fiction has at least the one obligatory "strong female character," regardless of if she fits the story being told. Apparently, for instance, cover artists have been trained to automatically put a female front-and-center on every fantasy novel whether they know anything about the story or not.

After being stung multiple times, I learned that not even books which appear to be male-oriented are free from this obligation.


message 10: by John (new)

John | 59 comments Henry wrote: "Marina may have more specific info, but yes, women are the targeted market across all genres, which is why all tradpubbed (and most indie) fiction has at least the one obligatory "strong female cha..."

Gee. In my unenlightened male condition I assumed those females on the covers were there to attract us guys. Or they were the result of the entire entertainment industry (movies, books, music, etc.) following the mantra of diversity in all things. But I'm a dinosaur.


message 11: by Henry (new) - added it

Henry Brown (machinetrooper) | 236 comments This article is from 2007. I'm sure it's even worse, now.

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/st...

I can't speak for others, but I know why THIS man doesn't read even 1/8th as much as he used to: I get enough feminist programming/conditioning/indoctrination in stuff I have no choice about; I'm not going to intentionally immerse myself in it during my scarce down time.


message 12: by Henry (new) - added it

Henry Brown (machinetrooper) | 236 comments Also, they make the usual claim that publishing is dominated by men. But about 80% (my rough guess) of the gatekeepers are women.


message 13: by Marina (new)

Marina Fontaine (marina_fontaine) | 1445 comments Mod
Gatekeepers are a big part of it. Not just Big Pub, but also book bloggers and reviewers are mostly women. None of this is a put-down of men, BTW. It's a vicious circle. Men read less; publishers declare men are not a worthy demographic and market almost exclusively to women; men read even less; publishers congratulate themselves on being right.

Men are also more into gaming (sorry, Anita & Co, but it's true), so there's more competition for their entertainment money. AND since more men spend longer hours at work (OK, I'm totally in trouble now with that one) they have less time to spend on reading.


message 14: by Henry (new) - added it

Henry Brown (machinetrooper) | 236 comments John wrote: "Gee. In my unenlightened male condition I assumed those females on the covers were there to attract us guys."

If they were drawn in the Frazetta style, I would make the same assumption.


message 15: by Henry (new) - added it

Henry Brown (machinetrooper) | 236 comments Marina wrote: "Gatekeepers are a big part of it. Not just Big Pub, but also book bloggers and reviewers are mostly women. None of this is a put-down of men, BTW. It's a vicious circle. Men read less; publishers d..."

Agreed. Big time.


message 16: by Marina (new)

Marina Fontaine (marina_fontaine) | 1445 comments Mod
Well, this thread got a bit derailed (it's all good, an interesting discussion). Here's-- finally!--my appearance on Speculative Fiction Cantina. The photo in the slider is of the other author, who didn't show. I had the whole hour to myself, and we were mostly hanging out and talking about freedom and lack thereof. Also, my book.

http://www.blogtalkradio.com/writestr...


back to top