Support for Indie Authors discussion

91 views
Archived Marketing No New Posts > Hiring a publicist

Comments Showing 1-21 of 21 (21 new)    post a comment »
dateDown arrow    newest »

message 1: by Miriam (new)

Miriam Scott | 2 comments Does anyone have any advice on finding / hiring a good publicist? I have no idea how to even start this process, let alone sort the scamster frauds from the pros who will get results. Any tips would be much appreciated!

PS --- If you have used a publicist, how did that affect your book sales? Do you feel it was worth the time and money?


message 2: by Martin (new)

Martin Wilsey | 447 comments I would like to know this as well. I have been making it all up as I go.


message 3: by Morris (new)

Morris Graham (morris_g) I'd be interested as well.


message 4: by Dylan (last edited Mar 03, 2016 05:27AM) (new)

Dylan Callens | 193 comments I guess it depends on what you're looking for... there are agencies like Marketwired that are kind of pricey... but that might not be what you're searching for.

It would be nice if there was some kind of indie co-op where we could share costs on things like publicists.


message 5: by Riley, Viking Extraordinaire (new)

Riley Amos Westbrook (sonshinegreene) | 1510 comments Mod
Heidi wrote: "Ben is dead on. As he said, do not confuse marketing with sales. In the long-term marketing will increase your sales (if you have a good book) but you cannot go into hiring a marketer with the pers..."

Ben wrote: "Miriam wrote: "Does anyone have any advice on finding / hiring a good publicist? I have no idea how to even start this process, let alone sort the scamster frauds from the pros who will get results..."

I understand you two would like to join in the conversation, but this is the type of soliciting we don't invite to our boards. You are more than welcome to create a thread in our paid services folder.


message 6: by Heidi (new)

Heidi Angell (heidiangell) | 241 comments It is hard to find a publicist for fiction books, unless that person is employed by a major publishing house. Part of the reason is that publicists don't generate sales, they generate exposure. Hard for an author to justify spending a couple thousand dollars on a publicist when at the end of the day you may not make that much back in sales.

If you understand that risk, and are still open to find someone, I would suggest that you google publicist and your book's genre. As weeding through the scammers, look at what other authors they promoted, and what kind of publicity they got.

I manage my own publicity since I realized that I can make my own connections by taking the same approach that they will. Finding good options for my genre, and reaching out to them myself.


message 7: by Martin (new)

Martin Wilsey | 447 comments I feel obligated to report that once my novel hit number one in the hard science fiction category during a promotion, I received lots of emails from PR firms and private publicists. The scam vibes were so high. None would say sales would be improved. None would supply references or other authors they worked with in the past. None had even read my books.

"Give me $3,000 to $10,000 and we will establish your brand."

I know several authors. All waved me off.

No thanks, I'll just write another book.


message 8: by Justin (new)

Justin (justinbienvenue) | 779 comments I remember when I attended an event there were these ladies who said they had publicists and I told them I didn't have one. They said they were going to look into getting me one(I didn't ask) and I was all for it. Unfortunately I never heard back from them.

What am I getting at? Well basically I love and have always loved the idea of a publicist. I spend day in and day out trying to push the envelope in promoting and marketing and it would be a breath of fresh air to have a publicist who could take the load off. Although it's not easy getting one.


message 9: by Owen (last edited Mar 04, 2016 06:35PM) (new)

Owen O'Neill (owen_r_oneill) | 1509 comments We have not used a publicist, so cannot report any personal experience. based on what I have seen, I'm dubious about them. For books especially, the drivers (which are different on each genre) usually don't appear to be things a publicist can do better than an author.

A good publicist may be able to find avenues that most authors won't think of, but that does not mean sales will increase. Despite what is often asserted increased visibility does always equal increased sales. Books sell or don't sell for myriad reasons, and publicist can only address (if they can do anything) on aspect and not necessarily the most important one.


message 10: by J C (new)

J C Steel (jcsteel) Hello everyone, I'm currently working with http://www.creativwriter.com/marketin....

Her unusual feature is that her three basic packages guarantee a certain number of sales, which is what you generally don't get from publicists. My contract hasn't completed yet, so I can't report on the full experience, but form your own opinions.


message 11: by Nik (new)

Nik Krasno Hi J.C.

Thanks for heads-up. Checked out the link. Looks interesting. Would love to hear whether your experience, if you work with her, and particularly whether the target sales number was achieved


message 12: by J C (new)

J C Steel (jcsteel) Nik wrote: "Hi J.C.

Thanks for heads-up. Checked out the link. Looks interesting. Would love to hear whether your experience, if you work with her, and particularly whether the target sales number was achieved"


Hi Nik! To date, we've been working on set-up - gaining momentum on social media, re-set up of website with SEO-responsive content, etc. I'll be happy to let you all know how the sales went once the contract period finishes out :)


message 13: by Nik (new)

Nik Krasno Thanks, J.C., would appreciate. And good luck with it, of course! I'm hesitating whether to outsource marketing, so any real life experience would help. Is a web-site a prerequisite?


message 14: by J C (new)

J C Steel (jcsteel) Nik wrote: "Thanks, J.C., would appreciate. And good luck with it, of course! I'm hesitating whether to outsource marketing, so any real life experience would help. Is a web-site a prerequisite?"

Hello Nik, to be utterly honest, I'm a terrible marketer, being the stereotypical introverted-author type, so as this firm does offer a guarantee, I decided to gamble some cash. I figured there was no way it could sell fewer books than my home-grown approach :)

If you do decide to work with CreativWriter, she's very much in favour of a strong social media presence (Twitter / FB / Goodreads / Google+ / Pinterest / Instagram) and having an author website as a central sales / information / contact point.


message 15: by J C (new)

J C Steel (jcsteel) Tamara wrote: "Sounds quite high faluting!"

Yeah :) I miss the happy place I was in this time last year ... I have a good book! The readers will come! :)

Getting a whole lotta gray hairs trying to learn marketing.


message 16: by Nik (new)

Nik Krasno Yeah, I feel pretty much the same J.C., as I'm not sure I'd be able to sell water on a hot day in the middle of the desert...
Hiring a professional is always an option


message 17: by Owen (last edited Mar 04, 2016 06:56PM) (new)

Owen O'Neill (owen_r_oneill) | 1509 comments J.C. wrote: "Hello everyone, I'm currently working with http://www.creativwriter.com/marketin....

Her unusual feature is that her three basic packages guarantee a certain number of sales, which is wha..."


Your experience will be interesting to hear about. I did note this on her website:
"Disclosure: If author chooses or elects not to follow basic, professional recommendations made by CreativWriter, this will void the guarantee. In addition, CreativWriter reserves the right to terminate services at any time, with or without refund, if author refuses to comply with instructions and basic professional marketing recommendations. This includes exercising quality control, editing, professional imaging, etc."

That sounds quite broad to me, and there is no statement about how this is adjudicated. I wonder what is meant by "quality control, editing, professional imaging, etc." If this is solely based on her judgment, this would offer a huge loophole for her to simply say "your book wasn't good enough, due to poor ... "

I may sound cynical here and there may well be more here than meets the eye, but I'd expect someone in this position to not accept a book for promotion, unless there were no issues with "quality control, editing, professional imaging, etc" and that was stated in writing as part of the contract.

This statement -- taken at face value -- is also problematic: "if author refuses to comply with instructions and basic professional marketing recommendations". If the sales figures were falling short, it would be a trivial exercise to come with basic professional marketing recommendations that the author would have great difficulty complying with, and then blame them or terminate the service, without refund.

Of course, this all depends on how a contract is worded, and I obviously have no info at all on this person's reliability. But for a guarantee -- and based solely on the info provided on her site -- this is quite weak.

That said, I hope she does well for you.


message 18: by Sonia (last edited Mar 12, 2016 08:42PM) (new)

Sonia Parin Miriam wrote: "Does anyone have any advice on finding / hiring a good publicist? I have no idea how to even start this process, let alone sort the scamster frauds from the pros who will get results. Any tips woul..."

Hi, (for what it's worth)
I haven't used a publicist, however... yesterday I came across a comment from a reviewer acknowledging receipt of a book for review purposes from the Little Bird Publicity (am I allowed to name them?). A google search opened my eyes to the big names using that company to promote their books. I bookmarked it, however, I already know it would be out of my $ range...


message 19: by Riley, Viking Extraordinaire (new)

Riley Amos Westbrook (sonshinegreene) | 1510 comments Mod
John wrote: "The explosion in self-publishing has diluted the concentration of good books available to the public. Any hack with a computer is now an "author." Books have become a commodity without much value. Look how many are offered for $.99 or even for nothing. .."

Not conducive to the group, nor does it fit in our rules John. Keep it positive, and don't belittle others.


message 20: by Riley, Viking Extraordinaire (new)

Riley Amos Westbrook (sonshinegreene) | 1510 comments Mod
John wrote: "Riley wrote: "John wrote: "The explosion in self-publishing has diluted the concentration of good books available to the public. Any hack with a computer is now an "author." Books have become a com..."

Continued insults can/will get you removed from the group. Do I really need to spell out what isn't positive in this statement?


message 21: by G.G. (last edited Mar 13, 2016 11:18AM) (new)

G.G. (ggatcheson) | 2491 comments John, I deleted your post. There is no need to be rude to a moderator because you disagree with the group rules. There are many other groups on Goodreads that would accept these comments...not here.

Please, be respectful of both rules and mods.


back to top