Our Shared Shelf discussion

603 views
Questions/Ideas/Ask the Mods > Films, Exhibitions, Artistic Works, etc

Comments Showing 1-5 of 5 (5 new)    post a comment »
dateDown arrow    newest »

message 1: by Björn (last edited Mar 04, 2016 06:32PM) (new)

Björn Emland (bjorne) | 8 comments As you know, not seldom literature relates to works of film, theatre and exhibitions, museums etc. (The club book "The Color Purple" is only one example.) There are many interesting pieces of work (i.e. both new and older films) that may be of interest to share related to the topics of this club, and that may be available through different means or as suggestions for those travelling. Thus, I suggest this list, where you may share relevant titles (+ year & country of production/location of exhibition etc).

*As for now, I can strongly recommend the amazing Turkish film "Mustang" (2015) by female director/writer Deniz Gamze Ergüven, about five young sisters' struggle for life and freedom in the face of a restraining traditional cultural situation. It's a "must see"!

*Another important film is the Indian "Matrubhoomi: A Nation Without Women" (Hindi: मातृभूमि, translation: "Motherland") (2003), written and directed by Manish Jha. This feature film examines the impact of female foeticide and female infanticide on the gender balance and the surprised frustration of the men, when by 2050 there simply hardly is any women left to marry in the region/country. This is a very upsetting, growing fact, that the number of women in the world is diminishing due to violence and bad conditions for women in health care and society. Time for global changes, indeed!

*Just to also mention two sensitive, beautiful and truly touching films by wonderful Italian director/writer Ettore Scola, who recently passed away: "A Special Day" ("Una giornata particolare") (1977) of the brief, soul deep affair of love of a subdued housewife (Sophia Loren) and her homosexual neighbor (Marcello Mastroianni) in fascist Italy.

*The other one, "Passion of Love" / "Passione d'amore" (1981), about a young, handsome military officer overtaken by true love of a sickly, hid-away woman beyond all kinds of superficial standards and expectations in the 19'th century. (Has also become a musical by Stephen Sondheim.)

*And, while at this vulnerable-love theme, I'll also just as well mention the British "The French Lieutenant's Woman" (1981), by Karel Reiz (based upon the best-selling novel by John Fowles), about an "gossip-struck", lonely woman (Meryl Streep) and a well situated gentleman (Jeremy Irons) in a small 19'th century protective coastal Dorset town.


message 2: by Björn (new)

Björn Emland (bjorne) | 8 comments As you may know, Emma Watson is the key representative of the UN Women's campaign HeForShe. At International Womens' Day 2016 she inaugurated the first HeForShe Arts Week in New York City. It presents different cultural activities in collaboration with different artistic venues around the city, running 8-15 Marsh 2016. In 2017 it's supposed to be followed by similar events in other cities around the world. http://www.heforsheartsweek.org


Ariadna Cebrián | 34 comments Björn wrote: "As you know, not seldom literature relates to works of film, theatre and exhibitions, museums etc. (The club book "The Color Purple" is only one example.) There are many interesting pieces of work ..."

I just saw "Mustang" last night, despite I've read some negative reviews about it, calling it superficial, "manichean"... but I found it marvelous. It really touched me. The actresses are all great, so real and human. it is, indeed, a "must see" :)


message 4: by Emily (new)

Emily Kirby | 11 comments I suggest checking out the Persepolis movie once you read the graphic novel. It's amazing.


message 5: by Harm (last edited Sep 05, 2016 03:56PM) (new)

Harm ten Napel (hnapel) | 94 comments I can recommend everyone to watch the movie "The Runaways", in fact considering we read Carrie Brownstein, this story almost seems a precursor of it but then in the 70s.


back to top