Vaginal Fantasy Book Club discussion

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message 1: by Priscilla (new)

Priscilla (gcrokzzzzz) | 37 comments I'm only 2 chapters in but how crazy is the beginning of chapter 2 driving everybody???? OH MY GOD those men! I understand why she wrote it this way, and I'm not condemning the author but I'm just so annoyed as I read this lol


message 2: by Keith (new)

Keith (dredchupacabra) | 19 comments The author did do a fabulous job of grabbing my attention early on. Rodolfo is so repugnant that you have no choice but to react emotionally, while most books lead you in slowly into the world. I just finished the book and enjoyed it.


message 3: by Sunshine (new)

Sunshine | 15 comments Very intriguing details of imaginative magic


message 4: by Harryo (new)

Harryo | 17 comments Keith--not "Rudolpho" but "Adolfo". I think the author chose that name purposely.


Too bad I keep picturing him as the wonderful Mark Ryland who was just the opposite kind of character in "Wolf Hall".


message 5: by Nabi (new)

Nabi (nabiwasabi) | 2 comments I basically want to strangle Adolfo. I'm only 50% done with the book, but every single time I read a chapter from his pov I want to chuck the book out my window. >_<


message 6: by Frakki (new)

Frakki Karu | 509 comments I didn't get through the first chapter before my feminist Spider-senses started to tingle. This could be interesting...


message 7: by Keith (new)

Keith (dredchupacabra) | 19 comments Harryo wrote: "Keith--not "Rudolpho" but "Adolfo". I think the author chose that name purposely.


Too bad I keep picturing him as the wonderful Mark Ryland who was just the opposite kind of character in "Wolf H..."


:) Thanks for pointing that out Harryo. I didn't notice that on my phone when I wrote it. I'm surprised that it auto corrected to Rodolpho.


message 8: by Emily (new)

Emily (bunnykaiju) | 2 comments I'm definitely having some WTF moments reading anything with Adolfo in it. Easy to hate him...


message 9: by Jane (new)

Jane (javc) | 38 comments With Adolfo, I skipped straight over "Okay, here's a villain" to "Adolfo=Big Bad, Buffy-style." I initially expected Royce to be used more in the book, but was glad he wasn't.

The misogyny had my skin crawling but I think it worked well in getting the point across that these guys are totally shitty.


message 10: by Gunnhildur (new)

Gunnhildur Rúnarsdóttir (grafarholt) | 173 comments Frakki wrote: "I didn't get through the first chapter before my feminist Spider-senses started to tingle. This could be interesting..."

I just became so mad reading those first chapters with those men who just thought of women as something to be pretty, quiet and compliant. And Adolfo, what a raving lunatic he was.


message 11: by Angela (new)

Angela Kravcevich (sheogora) | 20 comments I agree completely, every single Adolfo moment and other anti-female sequences was repulsive to read. It makes you think too, that ages ago back when christianity prosecuted witches, back when patriarchy was at its highest, women where treated poorly just like in the book.


message 12: by Michelle (new)

Michelle (stormfire298) | 52 comments I feel like in many of her books half the point of them is to illustrate mass persecution. She does pick extremely repugnant people to do the evil deeds. It always makes me think. There are still those with mindsets not too different than the men in this book. I always look up current brutalization when I reread her works. The article below has several examples of recent horrors. FGM (female genital mutilation) is horrific. The first time I looked into I couldn't believe that A- it happened and B- it STILL happens.

http://www.selenasol.com/selena/strug...


message 13: by Peggy (new)

Peggy Cawley (RosieDerivator) | 4 comments I can't decide if I like this book or not, mainly because of this overall theme. Like, I get how it applies to the story, but UGH.


message 14: by Keith (new)

Keith (dredchupacabra) | 19 comments Michelle wrote: "I feel like in many of her books half the point of them is to illustrate mass persecution. She does pick extremely repugnant people to do the evil deeds. It always makes me think. There are still t..."

Sadly the abuse Anne Bishop uses in her story is not fantasy. I credit her writing skills applying it appropriately to the story and not just for the shock value. Many societies rationalize the mistreatment as proper by either social tradition or religious doctrine. I find reading about the abuse difficult but am also thankful that it is being addressed.


message 15: by Michelle (new)

Michelle (stormfire298) | 52 comments Keith wrote: "Michelle wrote: "I feel like in many of her books half the point of them is to illustrate mass persecution. She does pick extremely repugnant people to do the evil deeds. It always makes me think. ..."

I feel the same as how you put it. I don't think she uses the abuses as just a plot device. You put that in such an accurate way. I started with Anne Bishop When Daughter of the Blood came out and it made me question so many things in a way I probably never would have. Plus it helped me deal with some personal things.


message 16: by Jamie (new)

Jamie | 19 comments I've always felt that authors highlight persecution as a way of reminding us what humans are capable of, the acts that we should not deny or allow to happen again. You would think it wasn't necessary. Watch Chelsea Handler's Netflix series. In the episode about racism, they show just how much some people in the South delude themselves. One woman claimed that slaves were never beaten! Just as there are morons out there that would say herbalists were never burned as witches.


message 17: by Kayla (new)

Kayla Turner (plainkayla) | 78 comments The parts about women made me cringe, every single time.

It was very similar to the religious restrictions placed on women in plural marriage as depicted in The Nineteenth Wife... everything was "for their own good" or so the men were convinced.

They expand on this much, much more in the second book which I have found even more difficult to read even though i'm enjoying the rest.


message 18: by Jamie (new)

Jamie | 19 comments Each time Adolfo mentioned the fey as someone to be worried about, I felt like he was going to start talking about a higher power or something. I mean, he made up this evil big bad for them to all be afraid of but no one ever questions the lack of a positive God type figure. I can see why he wouldn't care to be positive but it feels like a huge plot hole every time it comes up. Then there was the part where one of the fey mentioned that there were no forests in their world because trees cast shadows? Am I the only one that was thinking, whoa, light without shadow? Massive imbalance there which is the opposite of what the fey are supposed to stand for!


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