1001 Children's Books You Must Read Before You Grow Up discussion

The Family from One End Street
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Monthly Book Club > March 2016: The Family from One End Street: And Some of Their Adventures

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message 1: by Tiffany, Former moderator, current lurker (new) - added it

Tiffany | 213 comments Mod
Hello! Our chapter book group read for this month is The Family from One End Street: And Some of Their Adventures by Eve Garnett. Please consider joining us for the read and discussion. Cataluna6 will be leading us.

As always, you don't need to read the exact edition shown to participate.

Happy reading!


Cataluna6 | 128 comments How is everyone going finding the book? The library copy I was trying to borrow is missing so I had to order a copy - hopefully it will be here in the next couple of days.

Australia members - if you want to buy it, order through Booktopia via Booko - at the moment you can get free shipping that way.

Once I get my copy I'll set up some chapter goals so we can get to it.


message 3: by Tiffany, Former moderator, current lurker (new) - added it

Tiffany | 213 comments Mod
Cataluna6 wrote: "How is everyone going finding the book? The library copy I was trying to borrow is missing so I had to order a copy - hopefully it will be here in the next couple of days. ..."

I haven't been able to get a copy either. Out of three library systems that I can use, there's only *one* copy, and even that one has a waiting list! grrr


Cataluna6 | 128 comments From memory it was only $12 AUD, but it gets expensive if you have to buy all of the books.


Cataluna6 | 128 comments Ok. I finally have the book in my hands and am ready to get cracking. Has anyone else managed to start yet?

If we are happy with the below reading plan we can read/discuss with these dates:

Chapter 1 - Chapter 4 (pages 1 - 122) 12th - 18th March
Chapter 5 - Chapter 7 (pages 123 - 205) 19th - 25th March
Chapter 8 - Chapter 10 (pages 206 - 304) 26th - 31st

Feel free to start discussing the book at anytime, if you have already started, hopefully I'll have something insightful to add at the end of each week. Please use spoilers if reading too far ahead of schedule- but most importantly - happy reading :)


Heather (ladymcheth) | 42 comments I have my copy ready to go :)


message 7: by Stephanie, Active moderator (new)

Stephanie (teff1979) | 173 comments Mod
I have a copy


Cataluna6 | 128 comments Onto the discussion - I'm reading the 2014 Puffin ed.

How did everyone go with the first four chapters? Are you liking it? I'm enjoying myself so far. As the title say, one end street is full of adventures, it reminds me of Seven Little Australians in that respect.

The Ruggles seem like a loving, happy family even though they don't have a great deal of money and they have a large family. The blurb mentions that the family is pitied because it is so large, but I think that's part of their charm. They may struggle, but they make ends meet and are able to provide for their family. I like how Garnett introduces them, telling us how they got their names etc. And so far, each child is explored more in their own chapter. I enjoyed this format after the quick intro to all of them.

Below is the painting that Lily Rose is named after which Rosie and Jo see at Tate Gallery, (now Tate Britain). (Chap 1, pg 6)

Carnation, Lily, Lily, Rose by John Singer Sargent. I think it's lovely. {hopefully it shows up, I'm on my iPad so fingers crossed}

https://encrypted-tbn2.gstatic.com/im...

In the author blurb, it mentions that Eve Garnett had an interest in the conditions of the working class. In other portrayals of working class London in that era, children are often made to work from a young age. Rosie mentions that she wants Kate to stay in school and learn what she can rather than work, (Chap 3, pg 40). Do you think that was typical of the time or more a reflection of Garnett's beliefs?

It also mentions in the 1001 book that this was initially rejected as unsuitable for children when she was trying to get it published, apparently it was a no no to portray ones working class realistically! I'm interested to read further, this was the first book for young readers to move beyond generic descriptions of the poor (pg. 483).


Cataluna6 | 128 comments We're into April now, how is everyone going with One End Street? I realised I didn't post any brig over Easter, which I hope everyone enjoyed :)

After reading John's chapter (5), I started thinking about how the Ruggles children would get on today. They have plenty of adventures, but can you imagine happily going off with strangers these days?

Everything seems to work out well for them - extra parcels of food, returned hats, money for mushrooms. Part of it is because people feel sorry for them being such a large family, but is it believable? Maybe I'm just too much of a cynic.


Heather (ladymcheth) | 42 comments Cataluna6 wrote: "We're into April now, how is everyone going with One End Street? I realised I didn't post any brig over Easter, which I hope everyone enjoyed :)

After reading John's chapter (5), I started thinkin..."


I was wondering that too about the kids lack of supervision from their parents and complete trust in every stranger they met.

I recently read this interview with Beverly Cleary which explained why kids had a lot more freedom in those days.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/entert...


Cataluna6 | 128 comments Heather wrote: "Cataluna6 wrote: "We're into April now, how is everyone going with One End Street? I realised I didn't post any brig over Easter, which I hope everyone enjoyed :)

After reading John's chapter (5),..."


That article was great :) I had no idea she was 100! I'm definitely going to organise a 'Drop everything and read' display.

I tend to agree with her though, I know even 25-30 years ago we used to have breakfast, get on our bikes and we wouldn't go home until dark (unless we got really hungry, then it would be back out as soon as we'd had something).

I feel sorry for kids who don't get to experience that anymore. It really was a different time. It may have been different if they were in London rather than Surrey.


Cataluna6 | 128 comments I also liked in Chapter 5 we actually got to see the differences in the working class / middle class families. I thought that reinforced what Garnett was trying to show.

Overall, I enjoyed reading this. It was fun, full of adventure and I liked that despite the pity that other families felt for them they still made the most of everything.

I'm going to try and track down the other books in the series.


Heather (ladymcheth) | 42 comments There's more in the series?

I haven't finished reading it yet. I'm so behind in all my reading!

Have you read the Moffat books by Eleanor Estes? They're similar to this book.


Cataluna6 | 128 comments Yes, two more Further adventures of the family from One End Street and Holiday at the Dew Drop Inn. Apparently Garnett's house was burnt down and the second book was thought to be lost, which was why there was a 20 year gap between book one and two.

I haven't read any of the Moffat books, but they do sound similar, I'll have to try and track them down as I think I'd enjoy them.


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