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A Tale of Time City
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Book Club Discussions > A Tale of Time City: March 2016

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message 1: by Lincoln, Temporal Jester (new) - rated it 4 stars

Lincoln | 1290 comments Mod


A Tale of Time City By Diana Wynne Jones Diana Wynne Jones

Time City — built far in the future on a patch of space outside time — holds the formidable task of overseeing history, yet it's starting to decay, crumble .... What does that say for the future of the world ... for the past ... for the present? Two Time City boys, determined to save it all, think they have the answer in Vivian Smith, a young Twenty Century girl whom they pluck from a British train station at the start of World War II. But not only have they broken every rule in the book by traveling back in time — they have the wrong person! Unable to return safely, Vivian's only choice is to help the boys restore Time City or risk being stuck outside time forever...

This is technically a YA novel but I find YA fiction to be fun for all ages. This book was published in 1987 and I remember reading it for fun in 7th grade. This book left me wanting to taste a 42nd century butter pie and a fascination with time ghosts.


message 2: by Tej (new)

Tej (theycallmemrglass) | 1725 comments Mod
I've read one other book by this author, many many years ago called The Time of the Ghost. A cracking novel I thought at the time, where the unique point of view was from the ghost...and if my memory serves, that actually involved time travel too.

I have just picked up this book from my local library today which I reserved a few days ago. Look forward to reading it.


Nancy (paper_addict) | 990 comments Mod
My library doesn't have a copy but another library in the system does so I just placed my hold and hopefully it will be here by Monday and I can start reading.


message 4: by Lincoln, Temporal Jester (new) - rated it 4 stars

Lincoln | 1290 comments Mod
So, I know a lot of you have not begun your visit to Time City yet, so I won't spoil the plot. However after reading just a few chapters, I have to point out an observation I keep imagining.

This book was published in 1987 and in the super futuristic time city Jonathan uses his belt to pay for things...it also a light...and an anti-gravity function. The battery life is crap...But I can imagine our society today using our phones and our apple watches to make purchases...of course flashlights...I suppose we are still a ways off of an anti-gravity app...but I find it interesting a book that is merely 29 years old is correct in some regards...but of course Time City is ancient and has existed for a long time perhaps technology hundreds of years down the road should be better.

I got the same vibe from Bridge of years being published in 1991 and the present being 1989 in that book.

However, the passage of time does not necessarily equate to better science and tech in the future.


message 5: by Tej (last edited Mar 06, 2016 06:05AM) (new)

Tej (theycallmemrglass) | 1725 comments Mod
To hell with my dayjob health and fitness preaching, I want to have a Time City Butterpie washed down with a pint of Hogsmeade Butterbeer ! (I am suspecting Rowling must have been influenced by the Butterpie!)

The whole Time City concept so far reminds me of Asimov's End of Eternity but from a children's point of view.

The written imagery of Time City is quite fitting for a Studio Ghibli surreal interpretation much like their film adaptation of a previous DWJ book, Howls Moving Castle. Certainly no lack of imagination so far. But perhaps a touch too wacky a scenario for my reading tastes.



Btw, either my reading skills have deteriorated or is there some slightly bad grammar in this book, particularly with sentences not flowing well and lacking comma placements? I have a year 2000 edition so its puzzling (maybe I am not reading the sentences well).


message 6: by Lincoln, Temporal Jester (new) - rated it 4 stars

Lincoln | 1290 comments Mod
Welcome to Time City Tej...I hope you enjoy your stay. I think I read this book when I was about the same age as Vivian and Jonathan but I remembered them being teenagers. Its funny how the book perspective has changed on me, knowing Vivian, and Jonathan are 12 and Sam is 8. They are making childish mistakes and childish decisions...because they are so young.

I am personally distracted by the British spelling of things...but yes I will sometimes re-read a line and think wow that was phrased badly.


message 7: by Amy, Queen of Time (new) - rated it 3 stars

Amy | 2210 comments Mod
The author created the butter pie in the book because her extreme dairy allergies had her longing for all things dairy.

Oh, Butter Pie, I need you. Here's a real recipe for it: http://dwj2012.tumblr.com/post/229040...

I read this probably 15 or more years ago, so I'd forgotten that this is where I first saw an author use the idea I'd always had of a time ghost ... the idea of a place where someone does something over and over again until a ghost of that person/event occurs. I sometimes think my work office must have a ghost of me sitting at my computer typing away, sipping coffee/tea/water. Factories would be even worse with the repetition of so many tasks by so many people.


message 8: by Lincoln, Temporal Jester (new) - rated it 4 stars

Lincoln | 1290 comments Mod
I just might make me a butter pie for reals! Thanks Amy.

I like the idea of time ghosts being created by sheer repetition. However, the other side of the spectrum being a single act of such emotion or importance also generates one, rings true, in my mind.


message 9: by Tej (last edited Mar 07, 2016 12:59PM) (new)

Tej (theycallmemrglass) | 1725 comments Mod
Yeah. I like that idea of Time Ghosts too. Its a nice spin on the theory from some "paranormal investigators" that when people "see ghosts", (lots of qoutation marks there, lol) are electromagnetic or whatever-netic impressions of the last moments of the ghosts' highly emotional or anxious state. DWJ spun that into a time travelling version and its really cool.

I cant cook :( Well, I do cook but never anything edible. So look forward to reading everyone's divine experience with their Butter Pie!


Nancy (paper_addict) | 990 comments Mod
I not reading any comments! My library hold isn ready to pick up. I will get it in a few days.


message 11: by Amy, Queen of Time (last edited Mar 08, 2016 07:44AM) (new) - rated it 3 stars

Amy | 2210 comments Mod
I hope we do one day see a Studio Ghibli version of this book as Tej suggested. I did so love the adaptation of Howl's Moving Castle. Has anyone read any of Diana Wynne Jones' other novels? These 2 are my only exposure to her. They're such enjoyable stories though with such imagination.


message 12: by Tej (last edited Mar 08, 2016 10:50AM) (new)

Tej (theycallmemrglass) | 1725 comments Mod
Sadly Amy, Hayao Miyazaki, the great director and founder of Studio Ghibli retired a couple of years ago (with a beautiful swansong epic called The Wind Rises). Studio Ghibli will no longer be making movies and are currently re-evaluating their future endeavours (ie may become a specialised 2d/3d company for other manga film making studios etc). It was always a niche studio but very sad to see this beautiful craftmanship end.

However, on the brighter side, there are prodigees with their own studios (Studio Rikka being one such) who strive to carry on the magic and influence of Miyazaki and have done so with some fine films so far like Patame Inverted and Children who Chase Lost Voices but unlike Ghibli, other studios cant afford to depend solely on this dying craftsmanship. So...dont hold out too much hope for a Ghibli style adaptation of Time City...although nothing is ever set in stone, especially for time travellers like us :D

I mentioned earlier that I read
The Time of the Ghost
which I read when I was a teenager and loved the unique narrative in which the protagonist is a ghost attempting to unravel how she got to be a ghost. I remember it being brilliant at the time and involved a bit of time travel too. Coincidentally, I had actually forgotten its title and author and really wanted to know what the book was, perhaps also to read it again. So it was only in last couple of years, that I posted on our groups thread that helps people to remember a book name...and someone got the title for me! I didnt even know the author was so popular until that point and oblivious to her other work . Going by just these two books, DWJ's imagination is amazing.


message 13: by Amy, Queen of Time (new) - rated it 3 stars

Amy | 2210 comments Mod
Tej wrote: "Sadly Amy, Hayao Miyazaki, the great director and founder of Studio Ghibli retired a couple of years ago (with a beautiful swansong epic called The Wind Rises). Studio Ghibli will no longer be maki..."

Oh, I didn't realize that Studio Ghibli was no more. The most recent film of theirs that I saw was Arrietty in 2010. It looks like the last one they made was 2014. You know, now that I think of it, there don't seem to be that many animated movies these days for kids that are book adaptations. There are so many great books like these that children (and adults) would enjoy being adapted into movies, but, without Studio Ghibli, we've mainly just got Disney Pixar these days. I'm listening to a children's audiobook now called The Emerald Atlas. It's amazing and deserves a movie, but it's probably never going to get one.

I was looking through my library's website for Diana Wynne Jones books and was surprised just how many they have. They don't have The Time of the Ghost (although they do have an interesting title called Time Ghost which I think I'm going to have to check out).

Tangents!


message 14: by Tej (last edited Mar 08, 2016 12:25PM) (new)

Tej (theycallmemrglass) | 1725 comments Mod
Animation-wise, you're right, there are not that many adaptations but I think its because they are mostly instead being made as live action movies and in recent years, we are seeing a huge boom in childrens book adaptations, just they're live action. Disney/Pixar never really do book adaptations (apart from Disney fairy tales of course).

Amy wrote: "They don't have The Time of the Ghost (although they do have an interesting title called Time Ghost which I think I'm going to have to check out)...."

Hey, Amy that book is not by Diane Wynn Jones, it says Welwyn Wilton Katz? Did you mean a different book? Either way, its got time travel though!


message 15: by Amy, Queen of Time (new) - rated it 3 stars

Amy | 2210 comments Mod
Right. I know it's not by her, but it popped up when I looked for the book you mentioned.


message 16: by Lincoln, Temporal Jester (new) - rated it 4 stars

Lincoln | 1290 comments Mod
I am enjoying this thread...and when Nancy gets her book we will start discussing plot points and spoilers related to the story...in the mean time...Pass me another Butter Pie.


message 17: by Amy, Queen of Time (new) - rated it 3 stars

Amy | 2210 comments Mod
You know, I'm thinking we need to read a kids time travel book once every year or so. They're different and fun.


message 18: by Lincoln, Temporal Jester (new) - rated it 4 stars

Lincoln | 1290 comments Mod
Time Hunters!! For John.


message 19: by Lincoln, Temporal Jester (last edited Mar 08, 2016 02:45PM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Lincoln | 1290 comments Mod


This is the cover I remember. To look at the cover at the top of the thread looks very childish...this cover here reminds me of a very serious piece of art...


message 20: by Amy, Queen of Time (new) - rated it 3 stars

Amy | 2210 comments Mod
This is the cover on the book I'm reading. :) I'm finding switching back to late night book light reading to be annoying. I appreciate my Kindle all the more.


message 21: by Tej (last edited Mar 08, 2016 08:46PM) (new)

Tej (theycallmemrglass) | 1725 comments Mod
No spoiler quote from Chapter 4:

"Mum wont let me go down to Peckham Rye. Its very rough there. Policemen walk in pairs..."

Several decades on and nothing changed then...because I bloody live there! Most of my life too :) Its fun to read a story that mentions or either partly or wholly set in one's own city's past/present and in this case my own doorstep.

But I do wonder how much DWJ researched on old Peckham/London because at the time she wrote this book, North Peckham was indeed at the height of its notoriety in the 70s and 80s due to urban decay (labelled as worse in West Europe) but that was all after the building of housing estates for the homeless, imigrants and unemployed in the 1960s. They acted as havens for muggers and gangs etc (anyone seen Harry Brown starring Michael Caine? Like that), muggings and burglaries never made the local news because it just a very regular and normal thing. My house was burgled once (when I was kid), car broke in 3 times, I was mugged once and approached by an National Front "skinhead" with a knife (lucky I was a naturally fast runner) . But I learnt to use effecive Jedi mind tricks, waving my hand in a hypnotic motion uttering sentences like "I am not the victim you are looking for" and "you do not want to sell me drugs, you want to go home and rethink your life".

But before WWII, Peckham actually had prestige, with its shopping street Rye Lane being the most popular in South London and the "go to" town for entertainment. It areas like Whitechapel that were more notorious in those older days. Then for some reason, Peckham was the most bombed area during the World War II London Blitz which led to the later changes in Peckham's huge restructure.

So DWJ was a bit lazy there with her research methinks, as I know a little bit of my backyard's history.

Last year, I discovered I live on a road that featured on a 100 year old post card depicting a world war 1 cavalry with horses preparing to leave for war. To see my house in that picture gives me tingles...a real time warp because the houses are the same (first time it also daunted on my how old my home is!). I read the comments in the postcard link and laugh because most think the old houses must be long gone but of course, unless I am a time ghost, I live in one of them!

http://postcardsthenandnow.blogspot.c...

The reason I discovered this postcard was because they re-enacted this very photoshoot on the 100 year anniversary last year. Again, right outside my doorstep :) (second picture...in sepia to give the old look, I was disappointed to see so fewer horses in the re-enactment, lol)

http://www.hernehill.org.uk/news/peck...


Peckham Rye has changed in the last few years though, mainly because they got rid of all those dangerous council housing estates But now those estates have all gone, Peckham Rye has regenerated into a somewhat upmarket town with cafes and restaurants and nicer houses prices. But despite the reputation and changes, it remains a vibrant multi-cultural and rather arty community bonding place. Its got a unique charm amongst its chaos!


Sorry this post was way too long and maybe self indulgent, based on one single throwaway line in the book, lol.


message 22: by Tej (last edited Mar 08, 2016 08:50PM) (new)

Tej (theycallmemrglass) | 1725 comments Mod
Oh talking of time ghosts, I filmed my own time ghost...of me, just a week or so ago!

https://flic.kr/p/DF3yg8

it was a selfie timelapse of me and my time machine telescope :) But the effect of long exposure on people moving gives a ghostly impression.


message 23: by Amy, Queen of Time (last edited Mar 09, 2016 08:03AM) (new) - rated it 3 stars

Amy | 2210 comments Mod
How interesting to find your neighborhood in one of our books. They never get it right, do they? Not unless they've thoroughly researched or lived in a place.

That street reminds me of a scene or 2 from Doctor Who. You just don't see neighborhoods like that in the U.S., so it's intriguing to me with the rows of doors facing each other down a street with no cars parked anywhere. Where do the cars park? Or is the neighborhood walkable enough that you don't need a private car? It looks like it was a great street for kids to play on before the neighborhood got rough. I'm glad to hear the neighborhood is becoming safer. It's interesting how getting rid of something can clean up a whole area of a city. It's certainly hard to break those cycles. Thanks for sharing those pictures. :-)

And I like your time ghost, Tej.


message 24: by Tej (new)

Tej (theycallmemrglass) | 1725 comments Mod
Ha, its a stark contrast to American states, isnt it. Cars are parked on the road itself on both sides (just like the horses!). All residents moved their cars out for the re-enactment, hence why you dont see any. Some house have a cute little garage embedded between houses. Some houses have a small car park patch in their front lawn to park.

Me, I stopped driving years ago. Pointless. I found I was much more liberated by walking and jogging everywhere as London is so small and compact. Of course I can take train or bus too, no matter where you live in London, you are never more than 5-10mins walk from a public transport. But I can walk to central London in an hour...faster than a car during rush hour! Driving in London is stressful!


message 25: by Amy, Queen of Time (new) - rated it 3 stars

Amy | 2210 comments Mod
Tej wrote: "Me, I stopped driving years ago. Pointless. I found I was much more liberated by walking and jogging everywhere as London is so small and compact. ..."

That would be so lovely. My city wasn't built to be walkable, but they're now starting to add sidewalks every time they do street repaving projects, so that's nice. However, too many locations are not walking-accessible because you'd end up walking in a ditch most of the way (one reason I can't walk to work). Now that people have fit bits and step-counting apps on their phones, I do see more people trying to walk in the more walkable areas. Whereas before you'd likely get someone yelling at pedestrians to "get a car", it's definitely becoming more socially acceptable. Isn't that weird? When I walk to pick up my daughter from school, go to the library, or go to the grocery store, I always make sure to wear headphones just so people think I'm out for exercise and don't think "oh, poor girl without a car". Funny that that's been the attitude here. And the population is more overweight as a result. I'd love to live in a place that I could ditch my car because it was more pedestrian friendly.

I've been noticing that about this book, too. Everyone is walking everywhere. It's what humans were meant to do: walk.


message 26: by Amy, Queen of Time (last edited Mar 09, 2016 07:03PM) (new) - rated it 3 stars

Amy | 2210 comments Mod
Interesting. I didn't know that cities and neighborhoods had walk scores: https://www.walkscore.com.

Peckham Rye has a walk score of 78.

My city (Tulsa) has a walk score of 36, but my immediate neighborhood is a 70.


message 27: by Tej (last edited Mar 09, 2016 11:30AM) (new)

Tej (theycallmemrglass) | 1725 comments Mod
Amy wrote: "Interesting. I didn't know that cities and neighborhoods had walk scores: https://www.walkscore.com.

Peckham Rye has a walk score of 78.

In contrast, my city (Tulsa) has a walk score of 36 and ..."


Wow, that's an awesome find!

I put in my actual post code "se15 4pt" and it came up with a score of 95! Seems different parts of an area have different scores. Very clever, how it works it out using Google maps and the notable spots of interest along the walks hence the calculated score.

Thanks Amy, that's a site to permanently bookmark! I am always looking for new routes for my running sessions.

And well done with your walking endeavours, I hope your neighbourhood will look to you as a role model! I have visited America several times (New York (Manhattan), California and Florida) and I do notice, sadly, the alarming number of obesity...but mainly Florida and California, not so much in Manhattan. I also see how the lifestyle reliance on cars can be a huge factor. Not that England is without their obesity problems too but there is a noticeable difference from my observation. Mind you, it doesnt help with what we are force fed in both our countires but that's a whole different topic.


But there is a catch to the compactness compared to your more spacial environment and that is pollution. I am sure you have a lot more fresher air with your more spread out environment then here in the compression of London. So there is a price to pay for all this walking convenience! But admirably, the city is cutting down on pollution by encouraging cycling and upping the prices of car taxing in central zones. Cycling is very popular these days, in fact more roads are turned into cycle only lanes. Right now, though, their implementation is flipping dangerous as pedestrians (including me!) keep walking on the almost indistinguishable cycle lanes and accidents do occur. The best country I have seen and had the pleasure of cycling in is Holland. Their cycle lanes are incredibly well structured and safely independent from the cars.


message 28: by Cheryl (new)

Cheryl (cherylllr) | 872 comments The whole discussion above is fascinating. Thank you both.

The walk score of the neighborhood I'm currently moving to is 44. My current one is 49. *I* will find the new neighborhood more convenient as it's on a bus route and close to pharmacy, hardware, and office supply. The old was not terribly far from grocery, library, and bus, but too much for me with my mild handicap.

Interesting algorithm. I guess when we retire I'll have to run a search requesting above 60 or so to get something I can really benefit from.

Btw, if I wore headphones as a 'camouflage,' I'd have to have them turned off, just a faux disguise. Way too much traffic noise everywhere here in Carson City NV.


message 29: by Tej (new)

Tej (theycallmemrglass) | 1725 comments Mod
Yeah, headphones are not actually recommended for safety reasons in terms of being aware of your surroundings and alertness. It is generally discouraged (and if you are with a group, very frowned upon as an unsociable gesture!)...BUT I do love listen to music on my headphones, while I run or walk. I would sometimes be in a mood for the headphones and other times I love to just walk/run collecting my thoughts with the various background ambiance of rusting leaves through parks to the bustling sounds of the London streets.


message 30: by Lincoln, Temporal Jester (new) - rated it 4 stars

Lincoln | 1290 comments Mod
Tej wrote: "Oh talking of time ghosts, I filmed my own time ghost...of me, just a week or so ago!

https://flic.kr/p/DF3yg8

it was a selfie timelapse of me and my time machine telescope :) But the effect of ..."


Just now had time at a PC to really enjoy the time lapse...Really cool Tej.


message 31: by Lincoln, Temporal Jester (new) - rated it 4 stars

Lincoln | 1290 comments Mod
The head of Time City is always rushing and doing ceremonies. The ceremonies don't seem to have much meaning for Vivian not being a citizen of time city. However, Jonathan and Sam seem to not care either even though being the sons of city leadership.

The attitude of the children made me think. I know the Time City ceremonies are abstract and as a reader you don't understand the significance of them, but I wonder if Jones is making a point about history in general. Do the young appreciate history and the things that came before? I myself am almost 40 and have a significant love for history. However, I have co-workers half my age who don't know when World War II was fought.

Also, couldn't help but think of things that happen personally in our cultural history when we wear funny things for ceremonies...marriages and graduations come to mind...

No question, just a rambling thought related to historical ignorance that seems to grow with each passing day.


message 32: by Amy, Queen of Time (new) - rated it 3 stars

Amy | 2210 comments Mod
Lincoln wrote: "The head of Time City is always rushing and doing ceremonies. The ceremonies don't seem to have much meaning for Vivian not being a citizen of time city. However, Jonathan and Sam seem to not care ..."

I was thinking about the idea of ceremonies, too, when I was reading this. I think they're more important to some people than to others. To me, it's just a lot of puff and humph that is silly, unnecessary, and uninteresting. I'm thinking specifically of grand openings, planned speeches, and parades. To me, they just seem to be full of self-important people being held up on a pedestal of self-importance. I hate going to professional conferences and listening to the key note speaker talk about what a wonderful job they've done at XYZ. Boring. The last time I heard such a speech, the person felt so self-important that they didn't bother to name their organization or explain its purpose before launching into their speech about how important it was and what a wonderful human being they were for belonging to such an organization. So it was honestly an entire hour of nonsense. I elbowed the person next to me to ask if he knew what the person was talking about and he was as clueless as I was.

As for other types of ceremonies such as weddings, graduation, etc. ... I personally don't like to be in the spotlight, so I really would have preferred elopement or receiving a diploma in the mail. But I understand why some people enjoy such ceremonial events when they want to be in the spotlight for a choice or accomplishment they've made.

I've noticed that different cultures have different levels of ceremonial events. It seems that the more traditional a culture is, the more ceremony they require. And also, too, the closer-knit a culture is and the smaller a town is, the more they have. I think part of it is the need to have social events. But another reason is to keep up your reputation in a place where everyone knows your business.


message 33: by Amy, Queen of Time (new) - rated it 3 stars

Amy | 2210 comments Mod
Somewhere between giving a bath and doing laundry last night (a mere 15 steps) I lost this book.The good news is that I didn't accidentally wash this book with the laundry. The bad news is that I've looked high and low and can't find it. I must have accidentally sent it to Time City.


Nancy (paper_addict) | 990 comments Mod
I have my copy and will start reading today! I am excited.


Nancy (paper_addict) | 990 comments Mod
Amy wrote: "Somewhere between giving a bath and doing laundry last night (a mere 15 steps) I lost this book.The good news is that I didn't accidentally wash this book with the laundry. The bad news is that I'v..."

Oh no! I hope you find the book. Did you check under things or in a closet? If it were me I would have left the book in the closet while getting a towel, LOL.


message 36: by Amy, Queen of Time (new) - rated it 3 stars

Amy | 2210 comments Mod
Yep. Even checked the fridge and recycling.


message 37: by Lincoln, Temporal Jester (last edited Mar 12, 2016 11:20AM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Lincoln | 1290 comments Mod
I am sure you have done this...but go where you normally read...in bed in the living room on a walk home from school...I know certain people read everywhere just trying to find small gaps in their busy days to get in a few pages...but for me I have my reading spots...

Go to your reading spots...and imagine the last time you were reading it. Now imagine what else was happening...was the TV on? What time of day was it? Did the phone ring? Get a text? Did your husband or child come talk to you? What did you talk about? Were you alone perhaps doing chores?

I personally find that recreating the circumstances of when I last I had the object, something comes to mind to remind me what I was actually doing and when...This however does not counter other people moving or hiding things.

Happy Hunting


message 38: by Amy, Queen of Time (new) - rated it 3 stars

Amy | 2210 comments Mod
Lincoln, I was reading it while giving A a bath, went to put some clothes in the wash, and lost it before I could return to the bath. Poof. Gone. Literally 15 steps between point A and B.


Nancy (paper_addict) | 990 comments Mod
Did it fall behind the washing machine? Unless you have a front loading machine. When you went to get the clothes to put in the machine did you set it down nearby?


message 40: by Amy, Queen of Time (new) - rated it 3 stars

Amy | 2210 comments Mod
I wish. I've been cleaning and moving things around the last hour looking for it in every unlikely and likely place. I may just buy the e-book if it doesn't turn up by tomorrow.


Nancy (paper_addict) | 990 comments Mod
You know that as soon as you buy the ebook, it will turn up!


message 42: by Tej (last edited Mar 12, 2016 06:11PM) (new)

Tej (theycallmemrglass) | 1725 comments Mod
Ah, there seems to be one little cute element unexplored in the mystery of the vanishing book.

While in bath, "A" see colourful book that mum is reading.
Mum goes to put clothes in washing.
"A" gets book.
Plays with it.
Gets bored of it and chucks it somewhere.

Time to interrogate little "A" :)


message 43: by Tej (new)

Tej (theycallmemrglass) | 1725 comments Mod
Talking of little children, Sam is a funny little character in this book. He's giving me the most fun so far.


Nancy (paper_addict) | 990 comments Mod
Amy wrote: "Interesting. I didn't know that cities and neighborhoods had walk scores: https://www.walkscore.com.

Peckham Rye has a walk score of 78.

My city (Tulsa) has a walk score of 36, but my immediate..."


I have seen walk scores on real estate website butI didn't know where they came from and how they were determined. My address doesn't come up but a a few miles a way does with a score of 70.


message 45: by Nancy (last edited Mar 12, 2016 05:25PM) (new) - rated it 3 stars

Nancy (paper_addict) | 990 comments Mod
Amy wrote: "This is the cover on the book I'm reading. :) I'm finding switching back to late night book light reading to be annoying. I appreciate my Kindle all the more."

My library checkout has this cover:

A Tale of Time City by Diana Wynne Jones

Sorry I am too lazy to look for the image on a website and then post the html code. LOL Just click on it. It's the GR link.

This cover I thought was way more sophisticated and less childish than some of the others I have seen.


Nancy (paper_addict) | 990 comments Mod
Amy wrote: "How interesting to find your neighborhood in one of our books. They never get it right, do they? Not unless they've thoroughly researched or lived in a place.

That street reminds me of a scene or ..."


I have seen neighborhoods and houses like this in big cities (Chicago, San Francisco, Washington DC).

People park on the streets in front (if they are lucky to find a spot). The few people I have known that live in the big city didn't own cars. The can rent a car for a few hours if they need to.


message 47: by Tej (new)

Tej (theycallmemrglass) | 1725 comments Mod
My library book cover is the one that's shown on the group discussion heading which is more fantasy like but I actually like this cover the most. It more reflects the book's tone and I can tell this cover would have grabbed my 12 year old past self's imagination, instantly showing the two main protagonists in motion giving that sense of adventure in a mash up of the locations in the book. Not sure why Vivian is looking like Peter Pan, though!

I have actually bought the book now as it was only 3 quid and I thought was worth owning at this stage. I received it yesterday and it came in this cover.

A Tale Of Time City by Diana Wynne Jones

This one makes an attempt to illustrate the psychedelic future outfits and Time City. Not a cover that attracts me, though. Its rather garish and too red. I wish I had control over which edition I was getting.

But why do none of the covers feature Sam?? Probably because having him on the cover might deter the older readers, I suppose? But he's my favourite character so far! His huge appetite and eagerness to forcefully tag along with Jonathan and Vivian makes me smile a lot.

I know that as adults we like our book covers to be a little more grown up, especially reading it in public but if I am going to add another children's book on my shelf then I prefer the cover to reflect it as such :)


Nancy (paper_addict) | 990 comments Mod
That's not Vivian, it's Jonathan looking like Peter Pan. LOL

Sam seems older than eight to me. He sounded closer to 12 to me until they said how old he was.


message 49: by Amy, Queen of Time (new) - rated it 3 stars

Amy | 2210 comments Mod
Tej: you definitely got a raw deal with that cover.

So, here's an observation: if Time City isn't a part of history and doesn't have a historical record, how can they accurately predict the weather? I think.somebody's hiding something.


Nancy (paper_addict) | 990 comments Mod
Are you talking about Time City's weather? If so, they pick weather from another time period so they already know what the weather will be.

I think it was ch 8 this was mentioned. I will check.


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