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Glory Over Everything: Beyond The Kitchen House
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Author/Reader Discussions > Glory Over Everything - Author/Reader Discussion

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message 1: by Lori, Super Mod (new)

Lori (tnbbc) | 10035 comments Mod
Next month, we'll be discussing Glory over Everything: Beyond The Kitchen House with author Kathleen Grissom. Kathleen was here a few years back for our Author/Reader discussion of her first novel THE KITCHEN HOUSE! We're thrilled to have her back!

Her publisher has given us a total of 10 hard cover copies to give away.

This giveaway is limited to US residents only. Sorry, guys!

In order to be considered, you must comment here or on the blog for a shot at winning one and secure a spot in the discussion that kicks off on May 9th.


http://thenextbestbookblog.blogspot.c...

This giveaway will run through March 8th.


Winners will be announced here and via email (if you provide one) on March 9th.


Here's how to enter:

1 - Leave a comment here or in the giveaway thread over at TNBBC's blog (linked above). You must be a US resident to qualify for this one.

ONLY COMMENT ONCE. MULTIPLE COMMENTS DO NOT GAIN YOU ADDITIONAL CHANCES TO WIN.

2 - State that you agree to participate in the group read book discussion that will run from May 9th through May 15th. Kathleen has agreed to participate in the discussion and will be available to answer any questions you may have for her.

*If you are chosen as a winner, by accepting the copy you are agreeing to read the book and join the group discussion right here in this thread next month.

3 - If your goodreads profile is blocked (set on private), please leave me another way to contact you.


GOOD LUCK!!!!


Karin Yes, I will be able to participate in the discussions and I live in the US. This book looks very interesting!


Angel (gbelladauna) | 14 comments I agree to participate in the group read book discussion.


Book Concierge (tessabookconcierge) Yes, I'd love to read & participate in this discussion.


message 5: by Karen (new)

Karen | 1 comments I agree to participate in the book discussion


Rhonda Farrell (vanaef) | 46 comments I agree to participate discussion and I live in the the U.S.


Tiffany Proctor  | 22 comments I would love to and agree to participate. I'm always looking for new authors to read (new to me!)


message 8: by Julie (new)

Julie (scrapsofhistory) I would love to participate in this book discussion. I live in the US and I devoured The Kitchen House when I read it.


message 9: by Pam (new) - rated it 4 stars

Pam (bluegrasspam) I agree to participate in the group read. Looks like a very interesting book!


message 10: by Anna (new)

Anna | 4 comments I'd love to read & participate in this discussion!


message 11: by Deanna (new) - added it

Deanna Bihlmayer | 81 comments I would love to join this talk and agree to participate


Betty (bellemercier) This book sounds fantastic and I would love a copy, and participate in the discussion starting May 9th! :)


message 13: by Rosanna (new)

Rosanna (rosannabell) | 125 comments I'd love to enter the contest and participate in the discussion. I enjoyed the Kitchen House and would like to read this continuation.


message 14: by Nancy (new) - added it

Nancy | 1 comments I agree to participate.


message 15: by Olivia (new)

Olivia Taylor | 1 comments I hope I win!


message 16: by Lori, Super Mod (new)

Lori (tnbbc) | 10035 comments Mod
Olivia wrote: "I hope I win!"
Olivia, is this supposed to be your entry?


message 17: by Carrie (new)

Carrie Hunt | 1 comments I agree too read and participate in the discussion!


message 18: by Lori, Super Mod (new)

Lori (tnbbc) | 10035 comments Mod
Ok everyone! Names were thrown into Random.Org and the winners are.....

Pam
Carrie
Karin
Julie
Angel
Anna
Book Concierge
Rhonda
Nancy
Tiffany

Congrats to you guys! I'll be sending an email to your goodreads inbox shortly to get your shipping addresses!


Karin Thanks!


message 20: by Lori, Super Mod (new)

Lori (tnbbc) | 10035 comments Mod
I have been unable to get a hold of one of the winners. Since that is the case, I am going to randomly choose another winner.... and that winner is......

Leah!

Congrats again to everyone. Emails will be sent out to the publisher tonight and books should be shipped to you all next week!


Karin My copy arrived and the cover is lovely. I'm going to wait to finish some other books before I start it, but am champing at the bit.


message 22: by Karin (last edited Apr 28, 2016 09:59AM) (new) - rated it 3 stars

Karin I'm done and have posted my review. I'm really looking forward to the discussion. Grissom grew up about 141 km from where my dad did (that's about 87.6133 miles, according to Google; don't feel like doing the math myself at the moment) so, like me, is a transplant, although I was born & raised in BC. my review

(please note that my rating average is 3.17--anything 3 and up I like)


message 23: by Lori, Super Mod (last edited May 08, 2016 03:59PM) (new)

Lori (tnbbc) | 10035 comments Mod
Hello readers! Are you ready to get your discussion on?

Kathleen Grissom joins us tomorrow to begin the discussion on Glory Over Everything! And as is typical for me, I am here tonight to welcome her to the group since I'll be at work most of the day tomorrow.

The conversation is open to everyone - so have at it you guys! Hit her up with your questions and reactions to the book, her writing process, whatever you wish!



Hi Kathleen and welcome back to TNBBC. We are thrilled to have you with us again and I want to thank you and your publisher for making copies of the book available for our readers in order to share this exciting experience with you!

For those who did not read THE KITCHEN HOUSE, what is the connection between that book and GLORY OVER EVERYTHING?


message 24: by Kathleen (new)

Kathleen | 39 comments Hi Lori! Thank you for hosting me again. I am open to any questions that your book club members might have.

The connection between TKH and GLORY is Jamie. He is a character from TKH that, at the age of 13, had to suddenly flee his home in Virginia. When GLORY opens, we find Jamie, twenty years later, living the life of a wealthy aristocrat in Philadelphia society. But he is passing as white.


Rhonda Farrell (vanaef) | 46 comments Hi Kathleen.I have recently read both of your books and I enjoyed them very much. Now I feel sad that I am through with them! I loved the title Glory Over Everything and it was so perfect for this book. Now I wonder if there are any characters still speaking to you to keep the story going or do you have something new developing in your writer's mind?


message 26: by Kathleen (new)

Kathleen | 39 comments Hi Rhonda,
I am so glad that you are sad. :)
My strong intention is to next write about a woman named Crow Mary, a Crow Native who lived around 1872. She has a remarkable story and I am so excited to begin my research. Perhaps after I tell her story some of the others from GLORY might return to me as Jamie did.
Kathy


Tiffany Proctor  | 22 comments Hello Kathleen! I admit I have about 70 pages left but so far I have thoroughly enjoyed this book! I did not know the first Glory book was of Jamie's younger years, but I was able to read this book without having to know that. Does this era (pre civil war/1800s) seem to be the time period you enjoy? Do you classify yourself as a historical fiction writer? Is Jamie a character you created from scratch or does he have many qualities as someone you know?


Angel (gbelladauna) | 14 comments I love the way you are able to switch between male / female voices and multiple dialects. Can you share your tricks and tips? Do you write in the same voice and then switch gears? PS Loved both of your books.


message 29: by Leah (new) - rated it 4 stars

Leah Angstman (leahangstman) | 56 comments Hello, Kathleen!

My question for you is one more of inspiration than of the book, in general. There are many, many stories set in this time period and of this type of subject, and I'm curious what was the driving force that made you write this book? What was the thing about it that screamed at you that *this* book is different from the rest and that *this* story must be told?


message 30: by Leah (new) - rated it 4 stars

Leah Angstman (leahangstman) | 56 comments As a follow-up, what is it about this time period that appeals to you?


message 31: by Kathleen (new)

Kathleen | 39 comments Tiffany wrote: "Hello Kathleen! I admit I have about 70 pages left but so far I have thoroughly enjoyed this book! I did not know the first Glory book was of Jamie's younger years, but I was able to read this book..."

Hi Tiffany,
I suppose I would be classified as an historical writer.
I did not invent Jamie, nor any of the others. My characters come to me fully formed and they come with a story to tell.


message 32: by Kathleen (new)

Kathleen | 39 comments Angel wrote: "I love the way you are able to switch between male / female voices and multiple dialects. Can you share your tricks and tips? Do you write in the same voice and then switch gears? PS Loved both of ..."

Angel, my characters show up after I have done my research. It is as though I have set the stage and when my research is complete, they come on to tell their story. The most insistent voice gets to speak.


message 33: by Kathleen (new)

Kathleen | 39 comments Leah wrote: "As a follow-up, what is it about this time period that appeals to you?"

Leah, I write in this time period because that is when my characters must have lived. At least that it the way it feels to me.


message 34: by Kathleen (new)

Kathleen | 39 comments Leah wrote: "Hello, Kathleen!

My question for you is one more of inspiration than of the book, in general. There are many, many stories set in this time period and of this type of subject, and I'm curious what..."


I don't know why I felt driven to write this story, only that Jamie blocked me from the research I was doing on another project and insisted that his story was meant to come next.


message 35: by Lori, Super Mod (new)

Lori (tnbbc) | 10035 comments Mod
I love the way that you talk about your characters, as if they are living breathing people in your life, begging for your attention, Kathleen : )


message 36: by Leah (new) - rated it 4 stars

Leah Angstman (leahangstman) | 56 comments only that Jamie blocked me from the research I was doing on another project and insisted that his story was meant to come next.

I write historical fiction myself, and I always find it interesting when characters talk to you, tell you, "It's time." I dropped a whole book and started an entire other one based on a single dream I had, haha, so I know it can be powerful.

Can you talk to me a little bit about your experience with Simon & Schuster? (I'm going to be that annoying questioner who's super interested in the process and the craft, sorry.) Have you worked with small presses, and can you talk about the differences between press types as pertaining to you? What S&S did that went above and beyond your expectations? What was that one turning point that clinched the whole deal? That moment where you were really like "This is it. This is the right choice"?


message 37: by Kathleen (new)

Kathleen | 39 comments Lori wrote: "I love the way that you talk about your characters, as if they are living breathing people in your life, begging for your attention, Kathleen : )"
To me they are all that. :)


message 38: by Pam (last edited May 09, 2016 07:13PM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Pam (bluegrasspam) I really enjoyed the book! I haven't read any other adult fiction set during this time. I especially liked the Pan character, due to his innocence and his display of courage and compassion.

I felt that Jamie was not as likable as the other characters, starting with his irresponsible behavior with Caroline. My first thought was nobody would be that stupid but I later thought that of course they would! It's human nature! He was a good character, though, despite his flaws. I would be very interested to read The Kitchen House to better understand his early years and the development of his conflicted nature.

I also like the story being told from alternating viewpoints. That seems to be a popular writing technique now. I'm curious if it is easier for an author to write this way or is it difficult to change the voice and still keep the flow and the authenticity of each character. I like that you indicate the narrator. I've read some books where the author didn't do that and it was confusing.

I look forward to your next book Kathleen!


message 39: by Kathleen (new)

Kathleen | 39 comments Leah, I have only worked with S&S and I did so because they offered to publish my book. :) The support they have given me has been above and beyond anything I might have hoped for. And then there is Trish Todd, my editor. Wonderful is the word that best describes her.


message 40: by Kathleen (new)

Kathleen | 39 comments Pam wrote: "I really enjoyed the book! I haven't read any other adult fiction set during this time. I especially liked the Pan character, due to his innocence and his display of courage and compassion.

I felt..."

Thanks, Pam. Jamie was a complex character and not that easy to get to know. I wasn't that fond of him in the beginning either, but as I got to understand his fear I began to soften in my view.

I write in the different voices because that is how the story comes to me. I hear each character speak and then write them in. I feel that each one brings a different perspective and moves the story along.


Karin When I first received the Advanced Copy of this book I hadn't realized it was a sequel, so went and read The Kitchen House right before going on with this book. I have read novels about white indentured servants before, but this is the first one where that child lives with the slaves.

But this story is more about Jamie, and of course Pan, Sukey and Caroline, etc. There were many compelling things about this story, but I wasn't fond of Jamie. Just when I thought I was starting to like him, he'd do something annoying, and for someone so scholastically bright, he took a long time to figure certain basic things out; he seemed so naive in some ways despite all of his experiences.

Despite this, I was hoping there'd be one more to see what happens to Pan, baby Belle, et al. I think that would have been a daunting task, even if they'd chosen to end up moving to Canada, since there was plenty of racism and problems in Ontario, etc, as well although it's not nearly as well known.

Perhaps it might not be relevant to all, but one of the most intriguing things for me reading this was wondering how someone who grew up about 140 km from where my dad grew up ended telling this tale. While I don't think a novel is the person who wrote it (good thing, too!!!), it's always interesting to see how someone gets to the place where they tell a story.


message 42: by Julie (new)

Julie (scrapsofhistory) I have enjoyed this book just as much as I did The Kitchen House. I am curious as to why you decided Jamie was a character your wanted to write a second book about?


message 43: by Kathleen (new)

Kathleen | 39 comments Karin wrote: "When I first received the Advanced Copy of this book I hadn't realized it was a sequel, so went and read The Kitchen House right before going on with this book. I have read novels about white inden..."

Hi Karin,
I agree that Jamie was a difficult person to like, but as I came to understand him better I was more forgiving in my expectations of him.
I am often asked how it is that a girl from Saskatchewan came to Virginia to write about slavery. I always say that for me these stories are a spiritual gift. Virginia is such a special place for me and I believe that I was meant to live here so the stories could more easily come to me.
Please give my best to your father. :)


message 44: by Kathleen (new)

Kathleen | 39 comments Julie wrote: "I have enjoyed this book just as much as I did The Kitchen House. I am curious as to why you decided Jamie was a character your wanted to write a second book about?"

Julie, I don't decide who I will write about. The characters present themselves and pretty much dictate my next work.


Karin Kathleen wrote: "Karin wrote: "When I first received the Advanced Copy of this book I hadn't realized it was a sequel, so went and read The Kitchen House right before going on with this book. I have read novels abo..."

It must be harder to write about someone like Jamie than it was to write Sukey and Pan. I would think it would be difficult not to want to mould them more into what you'd like them to be.


message 46: by Kathleen (new)

Kathleen | 39 comments Karin, I found out early on that if I wanted to have the story play out I had to write it as it came to me. That included writing about characters that were less than perfect. But I guess we are all that - less than perfect - so perhaps that makes the characters all the more real?


Tiffany Proctor  | 22 comments Which authors did you read as a little kid and the ought your life? Is there someone you consider to be a mentor? If writing was not to be, what would your next career choice be?
As a side, I liked Jamie. I found him like able given the hardships he endured. I often sympathized with him. He grew up honking one thing to have it torn away so quickly. Do you have other characters you have written about that you are not always a fan of to begin with?


message 48: by Lori, Super Mod (new)

Lori (tnbbc) | 10035 comments Mod
Just a heads up, Kathleen's publisher let me know that they are hosting a goodreads giveaway of BOTH of Kathleen's novels. So if you got a digital copy and want print, or if you've only read GLORY and want KITCHEN, you should totally go and enter:

https://www.goodreads.com/giveaway/sh...

If you'd rather not enter yourself, please feel free to spread the word around social media : )


message 49: by Lori, Super Mod (new)

Lori (tnbbc) | 10035 comments Mod
Kathleen,

What was your favorite "author moment"? Did it happen at a reading event? Was it a piece of feedback or a fan interaction?


message 50: by Karin (last edited May 11, 2016 08:02AM) (new) - rated it 3 stars

Karin Kathleen wrote: "Karin, I found out early on that if I wanted to have the story play out I had to write it as it came to me. That included writing about characters that were less than perfect. But I guess we are al..."

It's interesting to read that you get your characters fully formed. I think there are different ways of developing real characters; writing, like all of the fine arts, is highly variable in the process writers and artists go through (we have professional actors, musicians writers and visual artists in the greater family mix, although no novelists so far!). Some of the great tapestry of life is woven from the different ways people work.

It's difficult for me not to draw from The Kitchen House since I read them back to back. Because a great deal of the enjoyment of a novel, for me, is how much I like the characters, I feel more attached to Belle and Lavinia than to Jamie; but there are important stories about people not as easy to like. One thing that stands out for me with Glory Over Everything that I think is important is that many people who went on to pass as white were much like Jamie and many probably never had the breakthrough he had at the end. It can be so tempting to try and mould characters from 21st century POVs, which means the POV becomes, and a better word isn't coming to mind at the moment, anachronistic.


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