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II. Publishing & Marketing Tips > Author or a Salesman

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message 1: by Vipin (new)

Vipin Goyal (vipingoyal) | 11 comments An author is walking on the edge of a sword maintaining a delicate balance between writing a book and promoting his work. Read here

http://vipinbeharigoyal.blogspot.in/2...


message 2: by Vasudha (new)

Vasudha Uttam (vasudhauttam) | 34 comments Hi I really liked your Blog.
Very inspiring for Newbie self published writers like me :)

Thanks!


message 3: by Vipin (new)

Vipin Goyal (vipingoyal) | 11 comments Vasudha wrote: "Hi I really liked your Blog.
Very inspiring for Newbie self published writers like me :)

Thanks!"


Thanks for liking my blog.
God bless you !!!


message 4: by Alexandre (new)

Alexandre A. Loch | 10 comments Vipin wrote: "An author is walking on the edge of a sword maintaining a delicate balance between writing a book and promoting his work. Read here

http://vipinbeharigoyal.blogspot.in/2......"


Well, I feel the same way. Though I have a book published by means of traditional publishing, I'm also a newbie, and don't think it's much different than from self-publishing.

Nice blog, congrats!


message 5: by Doug (new)

Doug Oudin | 168 comments Vipin, you nailed it! The sword you refer to sliced the soles off my shoes after I completed my first manuscript. My toes were bleeding by the time my second book was finished.
I have spent the next couple of years trying to hone the edge of my marketing skills, but the blade just keeps getting duller.
This author is certainly not a swordsman.


message 6: by J.S. (new)

J.S. Frankel | 60 comments As a traditionally published author, I still have to do all the marketing self-pubbers have to. There are so many new authors out there, that unless you're good and lucky enough to work with a Big Six publisher, you'll end up doing most of the selling (or shilling, take your pick) on your own.

It is a fine line between writing and pushing your work, no doubt. You join groups, connect, advertise, engage...and hope it all works out.


message 7: by Zippergirl (new)

Zippergirl I read a book about a decade ago about self-publishing and what I took away from it was: write what and WHERE you know. So I took everything I'd learned for my own edification about New England gravestones and put together a very local guidebook to cemeteries in the town I lived in. I was really astounded when the little weekly newspaper put me on the front page, and people even months later remembered me when seeing me at the post office or at the library. So instead of starting out in a crowd, I was competing with no one, and by doing small fairs and meeting/greeting sold a thousand self published copies. I wrote a couple more for surrounding towns and had some fun with it. Never did reprint them.

If you have a talent for writing, it never hurts to make it local if your story lends itself to a place in particular.


message 8: by Justin (new)

Justin (justinbienvenue) | 2165 comments The minute an author's book is published they forever become a salesman. The problem of course is balancing them to which some of us struggle to do.


message 9: by Alexandre (new)

Alexandre A. Loch | 10 comments Justin wrote: "The minute an author's book is published they forever become a salesman. The problem of course is balancing them to which some of us struggle to do."

What about the old school writers, odd and secluded persons who spent most of their time isolated from others? (hire an agent... lol)


message 10: by Jim (last edited Mar 10, 2016 08:43AM) (new)

Jim Vuksic | 1049 comments I am far too brusque and opinionated to be an effective sales person. That is left to the publisher's marketing and PR people. My personal contribution is limited to following their advice and staying out of their way. Any interference on my part would probably cause more harm than good.


message 11: by Christine (new)

Christine Hayton (ccmhayton) | 324 comments Jim wrote: "I am far too brusque and opinionated to be an effective sales person. That is left to publisher's marketing and PR people. My personal contribution is limited to following their advice and staying ..."

I have to agree with Jim. My publisher does the marketing and I do the writing - that is what I do well. Not every publisher requires their writers to be salesman.


message 12: by Grace (new)

Grace Crandall | 108 comments I'm self-published and probably always will be, so there's little choice about it for me. Still, I kinda love being a salesperson and marketer. It takes some getting used to, but so far all I've had to do is talk to people online (much easier than talking to people face-to-face, in my opinion) and keep writing. I think author marketing (when done well) has a vastly different flavor than publisher marketing--a lot friendlier, and not quite so loud. (Plus it can be pretty fun)
But, that's more opinion than experience, so who knows :)


message 13: by Amber (new)

Amber Foxx (amberfoxx) | 246 comments In Chuck Sambuchino's book Create Your Writer Platform: The Key to Building an Audience, Selling More Books, and Finding Success as an Author, he contends that all authors in all genres have some marketing responsibilities unless they are the top sellers with the biggest publishers. (He's with Writer's Digest, and his area of specialty is finding a literary agent, but he's also a humor author.) As a reviewer, I've noticed the difference between direct, friendly communication with small press and self-pubbed authors, and the official letter from a large press publicist who pretty much assumed that I would do her bidding. (The author who had this publicist was really nice, by the way, wonderful to interview, just as pleasant as the less famous. She just didn't have to do her own marketing at all.) I've had small press authors contact me about my New Mexico Mystery review series and do all the legwork themselves.
I'm indie so I have be DIY for marketing. It's challenging. I'm not brusque and opinionated but I'm not great at chatting on FB or thinking of stuff to tweet, either. I'm not sure how much social media sells books, but I suspect I ought to be better at it. I aspire to Grace's enjoyment of selling. I'm an extravert who is much happier talking to people in person, and so much of this process is online.


message 14: by Vipin (new)

Vipin Goyal (vipingoyal) | 11 comments If you are an extrovert as well as an author, it is possible for you to make publicity of your book and promote it tactfully on social media where most of the group moderators/admins threaten that any post of self promotion would be deleted. I mean this whole gambit has a great bearing on your self esteem.


message 15: by Amber (new)

Amber Foxx (amberfoxx) | 246 comments Vipin wrote: "If you are an extrovert as well as an author, it is possible for you to make publicity of your book and promote it tactfully on social media where most of the group moderators/admins threaten that ..."
Not sure what you mean about self-esteem or promoting where promotions are threatened with deletion. Mine and any author's self-esteem can be healthy independent of book sales or lack thereof, and I prefer not to promote anywhere that it is unwelcome. Social media is social, not commercial. Did you mean to suggest tactfully promoting in groups where the moderators don't want promotion? That was confusing. There are threads within certain GR groups that invite authors to promote, and that seems to me to be the best place to do it on this site, though it's of limited marketing value even there. I've found that a paid ad with a newsletter that goes to people who subscribed for the purpose of discovering new books is the most effective marketing.


message 16: by Alexandre (new)

Alexandre A. Loch | 10 comments Well, I see that most of us play the introverted style, like me. What about agents? Anyone here can tell us about any experience with marketing agents?


message 17: by Grace (new)

Grace Crandall | 108 comments I think it's perfectly possible to be an introvert and promote yourself. Marketing is about having something to offer, and knowing when and how to offer it--and it's a bit of a slow process, building up a following and all that, but far from impossible or even all that complicated. It's not really centered on being a people person--I'm sure that would help, but I don't think it's a prerequisite.


message 18: by Christopher (new)

Christopher Taylor (christophertaylor) | 71 comments It feels wrong and unfair that you have to be a self promoting marketer if you're an author, but that's part of the job. Its like being an athlete, you aren't just good at the sport, but you have to be good at dealing with the press and fans, as well. The job isn't just the fun of playing sports or the skill, you have to have other skills as well.

As an author, you have to have the skill of selling as well as writing books.


message 19: by Vipin (new)

Vipin Goyal (vipingoyal) | 11 comments Salesmanship and Writing both are skills manifested as Art. All skills can be used for inter disciplinary advantage. If you have so much energy you can do both. I use one on the cost of other, and writing is my preference.


message 20: by Alicia (new)

Alicia Ehrhardt (aliciabutcherehrhardt) Grace wrote: "I think it's perfectly possible to be an introvert and promote yourself. Marketing is about having something to offer, and knowing when and how to offer it--and it's a bit of a slow process, buildi..."

Lovely description.

I think introverts, if left to their own devices, market differently. When I see all the screaming, "Buy my book, whoever you are!" ads, I think I can't do something that gauche. But personal - such as recommending MY book when someone seems to like similar books - that I can handle fine.

It's a slow process, since I have little energy, and prefer to write, but the connections are wonderful when someone mails me back, "I don't usually read this kind of book, but I loved it."


message 21: by Alexandre (new)

Alexandre A. Loch | 10 comments Alicia wrote: "It's a slow process, since I have little energy, and prefer to write, but the connections are wonderful when someone mails me back, "I don't usually read this kind of book, but I loved it.""

Indeed this is one of the best things of being a writer. I prefer to make 10 true connections rather than 100 people that will add me and forget my book in a couple of days.


message 22: by Alicia (new)

Alicia Ehrhardt (aliciabutcherehrhardt) Alexandre wrote: "Indeed this is one of the best things of being a writer. I prefer to make 10 true connections rather than 100 people that will add me and forget my book in a couple of days."

Now, if those lovely readers would recommend me...

Someone made the comment that introverts are far less likely to recommend, and I'm pretty sure I have a preponderance of introverts (from the readers I've corresponded with), so it may be slow.

Isn't that practically the definition of 'organic' when applied to finding the readers for your books?


message 23: by [deleted user] (new)

I don't really mind book promotion but I do get tired sometimes. It's a lot of work to even get a few reviews. And, I do wonder how good I am at it. My fear is that I don't know a ton about marketing so I feel like I'm constantly winging it. But, I learn as I go, as do we all. :) Forgive my bad grammar - I am very tired as I type.


message 24: by J.S. (new)

J.S. Frankel | 60 comments Alicia wrote: "Alexandre wrote: "Indeed this is one of the best things of being a writer. I prefer to make 10 true connections rather than 100 people that will add me and forget my book in a couple of days."

Now..."

---

"Organic"...sorta like mushrooms growing wild in the forest. I don't know if I'd like to be compared to fungus, although I'm sure a few people have compared me to that--or worse. ;)

But yes, seriously, I agree with this sentiment. Thing is, there are so many new authors, published traditionally as well as self-published, it's hard to get anyone to notice you. So in some cases, you have to scream for attention--which I don't like to do, I prefer to write and submit my books and all that--and in other cases, you have to adopt a more laid-back approach. It's a fine line.

The readers who've bought my books and liked them, I can only hope they recommend them to their friends, but that's asking for an awful lot. The only thing to do is to keep writing, promote wherever and whenever possible, and see where it all leads.


message 25: by Steve (new)

Steve Kemp | 4 comments I love writing, and don't mind talking to people, but the idea of marketing is something that feels cumbersome. In reading about James Mitchner, he talked of both enjoying and loathing the process. Meeting people who like your book can be rewarding. He was on the other end though, where his marketing was to increase sales. I'm on the end where I need to market to get some sales.
I envy the concept of the lonely writer such as a Hemingway or Kerouac. But my reality is that of a father of 2, husband to one working at least 2 jobs while writing on the side. I write because its fun. Marketing seems like another job I don't need.


message 26: by Justin (new)

Justin (justinbienvenue) | 2165 comments The key is balancing both and not stopping on one to work on the other. Every author can be a salesman but not every salesman is an author.


message 27: by Jim (last edited Jun 11, 2016 10:17AM) (new)

Jim Vuksic | 1049 comments For those who prefer not to personally become involved in sales and marketing outside of self-promoting within the appropriate threads of literary website discussion groups, there are two effective promotional and sales tools that require no active participation by the author: variety (options) and availability.

Variety (Options)
Personal tastes vary among avid book aficionados. Some read traditional print books -hard cover and paperback - exclusively. Others prefer e-books. Still others enjoy listening to audio books. Having a work available in all three formats provides opportunities for readers with differing preferences to buy the book.

Availability
Some readers prefer to shop in brick-and mortar book stores only. Others shop exclusively on line, but limit their searches to just one or two websites. Some shop on-line and in traditional book stores.
The more commercial vendors that carry a specific work, the more likely a potential consumer will discover and purchase it.


message 28: by Marie Silk (new)

Marie Silk | 192 comments Zippergirl wrote: "I read a book about a decade ago about self-publishing and what I took away from it was: write what and WHERE you know. So I took everything I'd learned for my own edification about New England gra..."

Wonderful story! Certainly a case of "write what you know" being a success :).


Tara Woods Turner Supposedly it should be 70% writing and 30% promotion. Looking at my sales it is clear that I much prefer writing lol.


Tara Woods Turner Another gr thread about shy book promoters: https://www.goodreads.com/topic/show/...


Fire and Ice Book Promos Blog (fireandicebooktours) | 504 comments From what we've seen, many times a writer has to be both!


message 32: by Vipin (new)

Vipin Goyal (vipingoyal) | 11 comments Whenever I promote my book I feel less like an author.


message 33: by Annie (new)

Annie Arcane (anniearcane) | 59 comments Vipin wrote: "Whenever I promote my book I feel less like an author."

Hmm. That's interesting. Methinks I'm the exact opposite.

When I write, I just feel like a writer. When I interact with readers, I feel like a legit author. Might be (read: definitely am) a complete weirdo, though ^_^

Hugs,
Ann


message 34: by Mary (new)

Mary Buras-Conway (maryeconway) | 176 comments Annie wrote: "Vipin wrote: "Whenever I promote my book I feel less like an author."

Hmm. That's interesting. Methinks I'm the exact opposite.

When I write, I just feel like a writer. When I interact with read..."

I agree Annie. Vipin, marketing is not fun.


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