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Group Reads > The Talisman Ring Group Read March 2016 Chapter 7-13

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message 1: by Carol She's So Novel꧁꧂ , Madam Mod (new)

Carol She's So Novel꧁꧂  | 4120 comments Mod
Not many chapters but this is quite a short book. How are youfinding it so far?


message 2: by Amy (new)

Amy (aggieamy) | 422 comments The one thing that I really dislike about this book is how the Bow Street Runners are treated. They aren't incompetent. They aren't bullying anybody. They are just doing their job looking for a suspected murderer and I think it's unfair that GH has so many awful things happen to them. It really bothers me.

Otherwise ... loving the book.

I can picture Miss Thane and Sir Tristram growing old together and being remarkable parents. Their children won't be able to fool them over anything. I can just picture their reactions is a son is sent down from Oxford for mischief - Sir Tristram would be very severe and unable to look at his wife the entire time he is scolding the boy because she would be laughing to herself.


message 3: by Abigail (new)

Abigail Bok (regency_reader) | 1275 comments I’m not sure the Bow Street Runners could be considered a really professional investigative team in 1793, when this story is set. The organization was relatively new, and its employees were more skilled at working in the urban environment of London. The whole notion of professional policing was in its infancy at the time.


message 4: by Vasoula (new)

Vasoula | 43 comments I love this book! Every character is delightful in his or her own way. You feel that no character was created to serve the plot or compliment another one. And the story in itself has one funny episode following the other. How I would have loved it if it were made into a film , like Northanger Abbey by Jane Austen. Even though the book is not one her best, the tv series/film was very nice. As far as the way the runners are treated, I don't have an issue with . I found it harder to accept the way the moneylender in The Grand Sophy is presented.


message 5: by Louise (last edited Mar 02, 2016 10:42AM) (new)

Louise Culmer Amy wrote: "The one thing that I really dislike about this book is how the Bow Street Runners are treated. They aren't incompetent. They aren't bullying anybody. They are just doing their job looking for a sus..."

I like to think that maybe Sir Tristram went to see the Bow street runners afterwards and told them they were right about Ludovic being disguised as the abigail - maybe he gave them some compensation for their trouble.

The scene where they bring in Miss Thane thinking she is Ludovic is excruciatingly funny.


message 6: by HJ (new)

HJ | 948 comments I don't think the Runners suffer any lasting harm. Sir Hugh is persuaded not to complain about them to their boss, and when everything is resolved (avoiding spoilers here) they will be vindicated, I'm sure.


message 7: by Amy (new)

Amy (aggieamy) | 422 comments Vasoula wrote: I found it harder to accept the way the moneylender in The Grand Sophy is presented.

I'm trying to remember if the book came out and said he was Jewish or if it was implied. When I read it I didn't realize that the money lending thing was a Jewish stereotype because I was unfamiliar with it. (I grew up with little to no TV so my pop culture IQ is pretty low.) That didn't bother me as much because I felt like he was just a bad guy and was written to be a bad guy while the Bow Street Runners seemed to just be average policeman trying to do their jobs.

I'll be rereading The Grand Sophy soon and it'll be interesting to see how it affects me now that I know the stereotype is there.

Louise wrote: I like to think that maybe Sir Tristram went to see the Bow street runners afterwards and told them they were right about Ludovic being disguised as the abigail - maybe he gave them some compensation for their trouble.

That does make me feel better. :)


message 8: by Leslie (last edited Mar 02, 2016 05:17PM) (new)

Leslie Amy wrote: "When I read it I didn't realize that the money lending thing was a Jewish stereotype because I was unfamiliar with it. (I grew up with little to no TV so my pop culture IQ is pretty low.) .."

?? This stereotype predates TV by several hundred years!! It is based on the fact that in the early Middle Ages the Catholic Church forbade Christians from usury (charging interest on a loan). Thus money lenders in England and Europe were almost all Jews and led to their being the founders of modern banking. It was a less enviable position than it might appear because high-born men could (and occasionally did) default on their loans and the Jews didn't have a lot of recourse.

Some other literary works containing this stereotype include Ivanhoe by Sir Walter Scott and The Merchant of Venice by William Shakespeare.


message 9: by Amy (new)

Amy (aggieamy) | 422 comments Leslie wrote: ?? This stereotype predates TV by several hundred years!! It is based on the fact that in the early Middle Ages the Catholic Church forbade Christians from usury (charging interest on a loan). Thus money lenders in England and Europe were almost all Jews and led to their being the founders of modern banking. It was a less enviable position than it might appear because high-born men could (and occasionally did) default on their loans and the Jews didn't have a lot of recourse.

Some other literary works containing this stereotype include Ivanhoe by Sir Walter Scott and The Merchant of Venice by William Shakespeare.


I'm sorry. I didn't mean to imply that it was a stereotype created for TV, I just meant I hadn't heard of that stereotype so it didn't register when I had read it. My reference to watching TV was just that I don't have much experience with a lot of pop culture references and can be pretty naive about things that others seem to take for granted.


message 10: by Tadiana ✩Night Owl☽ (last edited Mar 02, 2016 07:36PM) (new)

Tadiana ✩Night Owl☽ | 361 comments Amy wrote: "I'm trying to remember if the book came out and said he was Jewish or if it was implied. When I..."

It's the description of his "Semitic nose" and his name, Mr Goldhanger, that make it clear he's Jewish (I just read Sophy a few months ago and spent some time struggling with this issue).

I don't feel nearly as badly about our Bow Street Runners here, although I'm just getting to the part where (view spoiler).


message 11: by Leslie (new)

Leslie Amy, no apologies are necessary. I was just taken aback by the idea that you thought this stereotype was from pop culture.


message 12: by MaryC (new)

MaryC Clawsey | 479 comments Louise wrote: "The scene where they [Bow Street Runners]bring in Miss Thane thinking she is Ludovic is excruciatingly funny."

Especially when she tells them why she went out!


message 13: by Amy (new)

Amy (aggieamy) | 422 comments MaryC wrote: Especially when she tells them why she went out!"

I loved that part. It was a sweet scene between Tristram and Sarah and one of the first times I got a hint of a romance between them. Hugh's reaction to the scene was wonderful also.


message 14: by Louise (new)

Louise Culmer MaryC wrote: "Louise wrote: "The scene where they [Bow Street Runners]bring in Miss Thane thinking she is Ludovic is excruciatingly funny."

Especially when she tells them why she went out!"


Yes, that's wonderful, when Sir Tristram plays up to her - so funny.


message 15: by Susan in NC (last edited Mar 04, 2016 09:20PM) (new)

Susan in NC (susanncreader) | 3335 comments I'm in the middle of chapter 8 and enjoying it after what felt like a bit of a slow start - love the interplay and sparks flying between Tristram and Sarah, and Eustacie and Ludovic are cute, but verrrry young! The Beau is delightfully oily and sneaky, basically everyone fits their role to perfection and I'm finding this a fun romp - not quite comedy of manners, not quite romance or mystery or adventure, kind of a light-hearted mashup of all of those genres; overall, a quick, well-paced easy read.


message 16: by Critterbee❇ (new)

Critterbee❇ (critterbee) | 2572 comments Mod
Yes! I love when Tristam does not hesitate to enter fully into Sarah's story! I began to fall for him a little at that moment.


message 17: by Susan in NC (new)

Susan in NC (susanncreader) | 3335 comments Exactly - and I love Sarah and the way she talks to Tristram - I can hear the wall he's built around himself crumbling, bit by bit...


message 18: by Cascades (new)

Cascades | 40 comments I didn't love the first half of the book all that much, but the second half made up for it. Loved the scene where Sarah tells the runners why she went out - hilarious!

I thought it is interesting that the secondary character gets to be the "deadly shot" and not the hero (although his "right" is famous!)


message 19: by Tadiana ✩Night Owl☽ (last edited Mar 09, 2016 08:50AM) (new)

Tadiana ✩Night Owl☽ | 361 comments Susan wrote: "Exactly - and I love Sarah and the way she talks to Tristram - I can hear the wall he's built around himself crumbling, bit by bit..."

Yes, Tristram's sense of humor has, I think, been MIA for several years, along with his ability to feel love and respect for a woman, but Sarah gently teases him out of being cold and stuffy. I went back and reread several of Tristram and Sarah's scenes yesterday because the two of them are so hilarious. They were definitely my favorite part of this book!


message 20: by Susan in NC (new)

Susan in NC (susanncreader) | 3335 comments Me too - along with Sir Hugh, I love how he manages to pick up on just enough of the situation to throw his weight around as needed, but not enough to make him in any way inconvenienced...


message 21: by Carol She's So Novel꧁꧂ , Madam Mod (new)

Carol She's So Novel꧁꧂  | 4120 comments Mod
Hi I'm back & I've just corrected the number of chapters. Sorry about that.


message 22: by QNPoohBear (new)

QNPoohBear | 1235 comments Ludovic does something completely stupid. (view spoiler)

I liked the scenes with the runners.The Runners sent after Ludovic are not the best and brightest of the lot. That was mentioned by Tristram, I think, that Bow Street didn't send their best lot. It was meant to be funny and I liked the way Sarah and Eustacie conspire. I like Sarah's sense of humor though sometimes she goes a bit too far and she put herself in danger.

Sir Hugh cracks me up. He's so absentminded and oblivious to everything except his own comforts and the fine contents of the cellar.


message 23: by Critterbee❇ (new)

Critterbee❇ (critterbee) | 2572 comments Mod
True, the runners were in trouble for making prior mistakes, to the point of being a bit in disgrace. Compared to other runners in Heyer books, they are clearly not the normal quality.


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