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Proofreading!

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message 1: by Alicia (new)

Alicia Ehrhardt (aliciabutcherehrhardt) You probably want to fix the typo in your last line if you're offering to proofread.


message 2: by Alicia (new)

Alicia Ehrhardt (aliciabutcherehrhardt) Anglina wrote: "Alicia wrote: "You probably want to fix the typo in your last line if you're offering to proofread."

Thank you, for pointing it out. That just goes to show everyone needs a proofreader :)"


You're quite welcome - I'm one of those people who do it compulsively on ANY written material.

I'd rephrase that as 'everyone needs to be proofread.' Some people can do their own, others can't. It's a separate mental function and needs to be treated as such.

I had a proofreader lined up for my debut novel who had personal problems and couldn't take the job on when the time came. I haven't had any typos reported to me yet (and I know where one is, and it isn't in the story). It helped a lot that I had spent a long time away from the book when I proofed it, doing the cover and formatting.


message 3: by Anglina (new)

Anglina Argabright | 2 comments Alicia wrote: "Anglina wrote: "Alicia wrote: "You probably want to fix the typo in your last line if you're offering to proofread."

Thank you, for pointing it out. That just goes to show everyone needs a proofre..."


I believe everyone can benefit from someone going through their work. We like to put blinders on for the things we do. Now, that is not to say that you can't do much of the editing yourself, but more that we have other flaws which proofreaders look for and find.

One of the things they do is looking at the consistency of a story, or finding and pointing out 'fillers'. Often times a proofreader will let you know when a sentence is very long and could easily be broken down. Not that long sentences can't be in a book. I mean you shouldn't have several next to each other or maybe the long sentence is a run-on.

Recent studies show that the average adult reads at a 7th-grade reading level. If you are using a large vocabulary, not many people will be able to read or understand your story. This means that your sales can potentially be affected. Sometimes what an author needs is to be reminded (or learn) that often the simplest of words can be stronger than long difficult ones.

To me, all of these things are what a proofreader does. They need to make sure that your grammar is correct, but also that your story isn't filled with gobbledygook and that your intended readers will be able to understand it. What good is a book with perfect grammar if it is too long and no one has the energy to read it? You won't sell it nearly as well as you could be selling it. Sure, that is something an author can be aware of as they are writing, but the author knows what the long words mean, and knows what we are intending to say. However, an outside person may not know and can help point out those things that aren't as clear.

So, I do not think I need to amend my first statement saying 'everyone needs a proofreader." As an author, (I too am an author) I have learned that you can do much of the editing yourself, but that will always be helpful to have a second set of eyes.


message 4: by Alicia (last edited Mar 01, 2016 05:04PM) (new)

Alicia Ehrhardt (aliciabutcherehrhardt) Anglina wrote: "Thank you, for pointing it out. That just goes to show everyone ..."

Thanks for being receptive - sorry for what seems like a snippy tone. Nuance is lost when you have only text to go by.

Proofing, beta readers, professionals - whatever you need to put out work with as few errors as possible. But it is now the author's responsibility in the self-publishing industry, and it needs to be done.

It used to be an author could blame the publisher - and publishers sometimes messed up quite a bit - even though readers have ALWAYS blamed the author.

If you write with that layer removed, you have to be conscientious - or have someone point out your mistakes after publication.

Whatever it takes - but your name on the book really means something now.


message 5: by Anglina (new)

Anglina Argabright | 2 comments Alicia wrote: "Anglina wrote: "Thank you, for pointing it out. That just goes to show everyone ..."

Thanks for being receptive - sorry for what seems like a snippy tone. Nuance is lost when you have only text to..."


True :)


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