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Sense and Sensibility
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Sense and Sensibility > Discussion 3: Chapters 37-50

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message 1: by ☯Emily , The First (new) - rated it 4 stars

☯Emily  Ginder | 1135 comments Mod
We will discuss our thoughts about this section, as well as the book as a whole, in this thread.


message 2: by Tracey (last edited Mar 14, 2016 03:00PM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Tracey (traceyrb) Finished today. Let me first say that Jane Austen is not my favourite author simply because I am not into regency novels unless I am in a certain mood. I much prefer hardy realism found in Dickens and Gaskell and Cather. Having said that, Austen is a supreme wordsmith and I absolutely love her insight into the hypocrisies and foibles of people and so called 'society'. She had a keen intellect and never do I come away from her books without gaining.
I love Elinor Dashwood and her shy, retiring Edward but more than that I love the way Marianne learns and changes based on her sister's worthy advice. The growth of Marianne is what I adore about this book because if I am either one of the sister, than I am afraid to say, I am Marianne.


message 3: by ☯Emily , The First (new) - rated it 4 stars

☯Emily  Ginder | 1135 comments Mod
Does anyone understand what Elinor sees in Edward? He seems to me to be rather weak and wimpish.


Tracey (traceyrb) Yes, she sees the integrity and intelligence behind the shy manner. She believes that in a situation where he feels valued his manner will be less shy and these attributes will be more noticeable.


message 5: by ☯Emily , The First (new) - rated it 4 stars

☯Emily  Ginder | 1135 comments Mod
Perhaps you are right, but he wasn't honest with either Elinor or Lucy. He couldn't stand up to his mother. He is basically weak and I don't see his integrity.

I read somewhere that many consider this book a tragedy and the saddest book that Jane Austen wrote. That was my feeling when I finished reading the book.


Karlyne Landrum Edward's integrity is shown in the way that he stands firm about doing, not speaking about, what he thinks is right. He's not a talker at all, and the idea of actually speaking to others about what he thinks is just incomprehensible to him; he can't even imagine that they'd be interested. So, he sticks by Lucy, even at the risk of angering his (horrible) mother, and he won't speak to Elinor about his feelings because it wouldn't be honorable.

I think Tracey is right. When he sees that he's valued, he'll become a more articulate person.

I think that often people who are very shy or introverted or quiet are perceived as weak - and that very often the people around them are stunned when those they've perceived as weak do stand firm on matters that are important to them.


Tracey (traceyrb) I don't see him as weak, but meek. He doesn't enforce his own way on others but at the same time isn't forced into doing what goes against his conscience. Meekness is often mistaken for weakness but Edward stood up to pressure to do what in his thinking was correct; honouring his promise, his word. Whether one thinks he was right in his choice or not, he did not make it out of weakness, it took courage to remain true against that pressure. A man of his word is worth more than a man of many words of no real intent.


Karlyne Landrum Tracey wrote: "I don't see him as weak, but meek. He doesn't enforce his own way on others but at the same time isn't forced into doing what goes against his conscience. Meekness is often mistaken for weakness bu..."

Those who are weak are easily swayed by others. Those who are meek intentionally defer, not out of fear of the consequences but as a choice. So I agree with you, Tracey, as to his character - meek, but a man of his word.


Carol She's So Novel꧁꧂  | 352 comments originally this was published in 3 parts.If I could I'd rate Part 1 5* Part 2 3* & Part 3.5*. I was really quite bored in the middle, although it picked up at the end.

Marianne was a well drawn character but I found both Edward & Col Brandon colourless.

My least favourite of Austen's Big 6.


message 10: by ☯Emily , The First (last edited Apr 02, 2016 10:12AM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

☯Emily  Ginder | 1135 comments Mod
Anyone over 50 interested in a Jane Austen program with Road Scholars? Here is the information: https://www.roadscholar.org/find-an-a...

Actually any age can take the course, but Road Scholar is geared to the "older" person.


message 11: by ☯Emily , The First (new) - rated it 4 stars

☯Emily  Ginder | 1135 comments Mod
I agree with this ranking! Do you agree?

http://community.sparknotes.com/2016/...


message 12: by Anastasia Kinderman, The Only (new) - rated it 1 star

Anastasia Kinderman | 654 comments Mod
☯Emily wrote: "I agree with this ranking! Do you agree?

http://community.sparknotes.com/2016/..."


I mostly agree although I would rank Knightley higher. I have not read all of her works yet though so maybe that'll change after I do.


message 13: by ☯Emily , The First (new) - rated it 4 stars

☯Emily  Ginder | 1135 comments Mod
Anastasia wrote: "☯Emily wrote: "I agree with this ranking! Do you agree?

http://community.sparknotes.com/2016/..."

I mostly agree although I would r..."


Higher than Darcy or Wentworth?


message 14: by Anastasia Kinderman, The Only (new) - rated it 1 star

Anastasia Kinderman | 654 comments Mod
☯Emily wrote: "Anastasia wrote: "☯Emily wrote: "I agree with this ranking! Do you agree?

http://community.sparknotes.com/2016/..."

I mostly agree ..."


Definitely higher than Darcy. I have not read Persuasion.


Karlyne Landrum Wentworth and Knightley are tied in my estimation, and, then, gasp! I might put Tilney next - his sense of humor just really speaks to me!


message 16: by ☯Emily , The First (new) - rated it 4 stars

☯Emily  Ginder | 1135 comments Mod
I like Tilney also. His humor and his patience with Catherine were endearing.


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