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Buddy Reads > Wuthering Heights Buddy Read

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message 1: by Emma (new)

Emma Flanagan (emma89) This is the discussion thread for our buddy read of Wuthering Heights by Emily Brontë


message 2: by Trelawn (new)

Trelawn I have my copy on standby. Will probably start in the next few days. Just psyching myself up : )


message 3: by Emma (new)

Emma Flanagan (emma89) I'm going to take a read it along with other books approach. My aim over the weekend will be to at least start into it.


message 4: by Sara (new)

Sara | 2357 comments Mod
Looking forward to this buddy read!


message 5: by Margo (new)

Margo I really didn't enjoy enjoy this one when i read it many years ago, but I'd like to keep an eye on this in case you guys have any new interesting insighs. Any to see if Emma's opinion of Cathy changes any on reflection!


message 6: by Kevin (new)

Kevin Awh lads, is this part of some penitential rite during lent or something? :P


message 7: by Paul (new)

Paul I can't wait to see Trelawn throw the book at the wall


message 8: by Margo (new)

Margo Ha! I'd keep out of firing range til she's done ;0


message 9: by SherryRose (new)

SherryRose | 0 comments I love Wuthering Heights. It's been a while since I read it but I love it. It's easy to find too since it's a classic.


message 10: by Emma (new)

Emma Flanagan (emma89) Well I've made it to the end of the first section (Cathy and Heathcliffs childhood) without wanting to kill them, admittedly this is the section when both are the most sympathetic. I'd forgotten just how young Cathy is when Linton proposes and she tells Nelly of her feelings...only 15. I'd also forgotten just how much the Lintons annoy me. Cathy and Heathcliff may be head wrecking but the Lintons are just so insipid and whingy.


message 11: by SherryRose (last edited Feb 28, 2016 12:33PM) (new)

SherryRose | 0 comments SPOILER!!! (I can't get symbols to work)

The Lintons are snobs. Heathcliff started out as a sympathetic character. Cathy was too but shades of snobbery showed up early in some ways. I wonder why Cathy's dad brought home a street urchin and favored him? Maybe he was trying for Christian charity.


message 12: by Cathleen (new)

Cathleen | 2409 comments Margo wrote: "I really didn't enjoy enjoy this one when i read it many years ago, but I'd like to keep an eye on this in case you guys have any new interesting insighs. Any to see if Emma's opinion of Cathy chan..."

I'm with Margo on this one. I'd like to keep an eye on your buddy read--if not to find out something new, then to read about how many times the novel gets hurled across the room :). I remember Cathy as being an over-the-top, drama queen, manipulative and self-centered--and Heathcliff a head case. But it's been years and years since I've read it.


message 13: by SherryRose (new)

SherryRose | 0 comments Yes they were both egocentric spoiled brats and Heathcliff was psychopathic, or sociopathic at least. In fact he was one of the cruelest fictional characters of all time in my opinion. I never thought of W.H. as a love story. But I still love the book. It's so well written. I wonder how many mentally ill people the Brontes knew. They seem to have a handle on it.


message 14: by Emma (new)

Emma Flanagan (emma89) Well I finished this today and without throwing the book at the wall once. While certainly not likeable characters Cathy and Heathcliff didn't annoy me quite as much....that honour lies with Linton who hasn't a single redeemable feature. I'll never like Wuthering Heights but I can see the appeal to those that do between the original anti hero and heroine, and the passionate love declarations.

What do people think of Nelly? As the storyteller she often gets overlooked in the whole Cathy-Heathcliff saga, yet she often plays a role in the story.


message 15: by Kevin (new)

Kevin Nelly is probably the most likeable character since she is closest thing to motherly, but is an incredibly biased and unreliable narrator at the same time.


message 16: by SherryRose (new)

SherryRose | 0 comments Nelly goes back and forth where Heathcliff is concerned. At first he was like a dirty stray dog, then she thought he was manipulative, then she felt sorry for him. She mostly didn't like him. I think she was more inclined to spoil the others. The only one who didn't make Heathcliff feel subhuman was the father. But he saw Heathcliff as a project so maybe he did too.

So, back to Nelly, She wasn't neutral. I'd say she's unreliable. I agree with you Kevin. She always saw Heathcliff as the street urchin. The color of his skin didn't help to change that attitude.


message 17: by Trelawn (new)

Trelawn I am about a quarter into it and my main observations so far are that I don't loathe Heathcliff as much. I feel sort of sorry for him, he was broken from the start and both Mr Earnshaw and Cathy used him for their own reasons. I love Nelly, unreliable or not. Cathy still irritates me. She is afforded numerous opportunities to be a better person but chooses to be a cow every time. I have no definite feelings on Linton one way or the other yet.


message 18: by SherryRose (new)

SherryRose | 0 comments I never saw any maturity in Cathy or in Heathcliff. He's fueled by hatred and she's forever spoiled and completely selfish. Linton is a snob but he's not as bad as them.


message 19: by Emma (last edited Mar 04, 2016 01:43PM) (new)

Emma Flanagan (emma89) I don't know. To a certain extent both Cathleen and Heathcliff can be said to be a product of their rather neglectful upbringing. Linton has no such justification. He arrives a spoilt and selfish child and grows increasingly so while at the heights. Yet while Heathcliff treatment of him is far from kind and most certainly neglectful, there is nothing to suggest it is as cruel as that inflicted on either Heathcliff or Hareton. Linton and Hareton are actually an interesting study in nature vs nurture. Which has a greater impact? A person's basic nature or the treatment they receive as they develop.


message 20: by Kevin (new)

Kevin While doing further research a came across a paper that claimed Heathcliff can be read as a metaphor for Ireland. Being taken in by the civilised English and taught manners etc. etc. I think it's a fairly weak link but interesting thought.

I'd really like to hear from someone who thoroughly enjoys this novel, and there seem to be plenty around.


message 21: by SherryRose (new)

SherryRose | 0 comments I was getting Edgar and Linton mixed up. I felt sorry for Linton. Heathcliff was horribly cruel to him.


message 22: by SherryRose (last edited Mar 04, 2016 02:49PM) (new)

SherryRose | 0 comments Emma wrote: "I don't know. To a certain extent both Cathleen and Heathcliff can be said to be a product of their rather neglectful upbringing. Linton has no such justification. He arrives a spoilt and selfish c..."

That's a difficult question to answer isn't it? There are people who grow up in horrible circumstances and they rise above it and become strong and good people. Others are very damaged and act like Heathcliff. Although, most of Heathcliffs problem is unforgiveness and vengeance. Also his obsession with Cathy was way out of control and threw him off balance.


message 23: by Emma (new)

Emma Flanagan (emma89) I've heard that one before Kevin. The book was published around the time of the famine and the Brontes had Irish connections. There is no strong evidence to support it though. The details about given about Heathcliff's description are vague and insufficient to identify a race. All we know is he is "dark" and often described as a gypsy suggesting he is probably sallow with dark hair. Given the time the book is published he could be from anywhere in central or southern Europe. He could also be a "black" Irish. It seems unlikely though.


message 24: by Emma (new)

Emma Flanagan (emma89) Sherry wrote: "Emma wrote: "I don't know. To a certain extent both Cathleen and Heathcliff can be said to be a product of their rather neglectful upbringing. Linton has no such justification. He arrives a spoilt ..."

It certainly can't be answered definitively within the real world. I suspect for Emily Bronte the answer was nature. Nature in the physical sense, and of her characters, seems very important to her.


message 25: by Trelawn (new)

Trelawn Starting to lose patience with Cathy again. Starving herself, locking herself in her room. This is a married woman , not her in her teens. And the doctor giving out about Edgar for provoking her, knowing her disposition!!! She is the reason women were called hysterical. Give me Jane Eyre any day.


message 26: by SherryRose (last edited Mar 06, 2016 01:23PM) (new)

SherryRose | 0 comments Jane was a much stronger woman. She had character. Cathy was a spoiled manipulative brat. You would think that Heathcliff could have found someone else when he was away. Of course the story is all about his twisted obsession and her spoiled rotten indifference. Unless of course she was feeling the need for attention.

I loved the book in spite of them Lol! Never a dull moment.


message 27: by Margo (new)

Margo Trelawn wrote: "Starting to lose patience with Cathy again. Starving herself, locking herself in her room. This is a married woman , not her in her teens. And the doctor giving out about Edgar for provoking her, k..."

Thanks Trelawn for remindingme why I disliked this book so much!! Reading the comments of the others I was starting to wonder should I give it another go. Noooooo ;-P


message 28: by SherryRose (new)

SherryRose | 0 comments Haha! Don't ask why but I loved it. I read Wh in a weekend because I couldn't put it down. Before that, I'd seen the old movie with Lawrence Olivier. It was only half of the story and made Heathcliff and Catherine look like lovesick sweethearts. This is no love story by any means! It's a study of mental illness and narcissism. Maybe that's why it's interesting.


message 29: by Trelawn (new)

Trelawn I have a better appreciation of the story this time round and I am enjoying the narration by Nelly. But Cathy and Hindley are driving me to distraction. I know Hindley lost his wife but it is absurd that Nelly has to hide his son in a cupboard to avoid physical violence. The Earnshaws are beyond screwed up. Heathcliff had a bad start in life but Mr Earnshaw would have done him a favour by leaving him in Liverpool


message 30: by Serf (new)

Serf So not related to this book but radio 4 have interesting book discussions. Found this on on Jane eyre for all you classic fans
http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b05y11v8


message 31: by SherryRose (new)

SherryRose | 0 comments The old movie was just on. It's so unlike Wuthering Heights it should have a different title.


message 32: by Emma (new)

Emma Flanagan (emma89) I was watching a thing on BBC 2 about the Brontes and once commentator, in relation to why Anne often gets overlooked, quipped she was quite then Charlotte and not as weird as Emily. I had to laugh at it. Weird does seem to sum up Emily.


message 33: by SherryRose (new)

SherryRose | 0 comments I don't know much about Emily but Heathcliff is weird. Lol


message 34: by SherryRose (new)

SherryRose | 0 comments Although you could write about a weird person without actually being weird. Otherwise all those murder mystery writers would be scary.


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Wuthering Heights (other topics)

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Emily Brontë (other topics)