What's the Name of That Book??? discussion

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Suggest books for me > Holocaust Fiction About Non-Jewish Victims

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message 1: by [deleted user] (last edited Feb 24, 2016 09:50AM) (new)

I think books should always exist about the Jews who died in the Holocaust. We need to remember the horrors of it all.

However, I'd like to find some fiction about the other victims--disabled people, gays, etc. I feel like they're underrepresented in literature.

I'd prefer for it to be YA or at least appropriate for teens.


message 2: by Samantha (last edited Feb 24, 2016 09:57AM) (new)

Samantha | 70 comments Try Witnesses to War by Michael Leapman it shows all viewpoints. It's non-fiction, but I liked it when I was in school.


message 3: by [deleted user] (new)

Thanks, I'll check it out. :)


message 4: by Joseph (new)

Joseph  (bluemanticore) | 441 comments I think Between Shades of Gray by Ruta Sepetys is the sort of book you are looking for. A Coming Evil by Vivian Vande Velde might work for you, also, as well as The Woman Who Heard Color by Kelly Jones.


message 5: by Mandiann (new)

Mandiann (goodreadscommandiann) | 22 comments Rose Under Fire
And I second Between Shades of Gray.


message 6: by Jenna (new)

Jenna | 595 comments I posted a similar query not that long ago:

https://www.goodreads.com/topic/show/...

(the title is a bit misleading)


message 7: by Jenna (new)

Jenna | 595 comments Also, not particulalry related to the Holocaust or extermination of non-Jews is The Undertaking which is about a German soldier and his marriage of convenience to a German woman (to escape getting sent to the Eastern front)


message 8: by C. (last edited Feb 25, 2016 06:40AM) (new)

C. | 219 comments The Theory and Practice of Hell The German Concentration Camps and the System Behind Them by Eugen Kogon



Classics on Nazi Germany
https://www.goodreads.com/list/show/3...


Well-Written Holocaust Books
https://www.goodreads.com/list/show/1...


message 10: by Tytti (last edited Feb 25, 2016 10:07AM) (new)

Tytti | 190 comments Joseph wrote: "I think Between Shades of Gray by Ruta Sepetys is the sort of book you are looking for."

I wouldn't call that Holocaust fiction as it has little to do with Germany, and the Holocaust these days refers almost exclusively to the crimes of Nazi Germany. Stalin's terror is a whole different matter and his purges and deportations lasted over 20 years, WWII was only a part of it. Actually most of the mass executions probably happened even before that, between 1936 and 1938 and the mass deportations to forced labour camps had started in 1929 at the latest. At least we never refer to Stalin's tens of thousands of Finnish victims (Soviet citizens but ethnic Finns in the USSR) as victims of the Holocaust. (It would actually mean that Germany helped to save an entire country from the Holocaust... So yeah, there is a difference.)

Also I really don't see what books wouldn't be appropriate for teenagers. They are either accurate or they are not, though I wouldn't give a memoir about Gulag for a young child. The descriptions can be quite brutal.


message 11: by Lobstergirl, au gratin (new)

Lobstergirl | 37760 comments Mod
Well, there is actually a large number of YA books having to do with the Holocaust, so authors are finding a way to do it for readers who are not yet adults. Doubtless the brutality is being glossed over.


message 12: by Lobstergirl, au gratin (new)

Lobstergirl | 37760 comments Mod
Train


message 13: by Tytti (new)

Tytti | 190 comments "Not yet adults" doesn't mean that they couldn't read normal books about the subject, about any subject. I think we covered this at school when we were about 13 or 14 and I doubt that kids much younger than that are interested about it, nor should they be really. (Well I was but it wasn't common.)


message 14: by Jenna (new)

Jenna | 595 comments Possibly My Enemy's Cradle?


message 15: by Jenna (new)

Jenna | 595 comments Also possibly Someone Named Eva...more YA


message 16: by Ket (last edited Mar 15, 2016 04:50PM) (new)

Ket | 164 comments Lobstergirl wrote: "Well, there is actually a large number of YA books having to do with the Holocaust, so authors are finding a way to do it for readers who are not yet adults. Doubtless the brutality is being glosse..."

I'm listening to one of these on audio CD at the moment, Anna and the Swallow Man, which fits this bill since the protagonist's father is taken away because he's an intellectual and a scholar, not because he is Jewish. The story follows his daughter on the run. I also read The Book Thief very recently on others' suggestions and I can confirm your suspicion. Although death is present in these books, and there are bodies and the characters are faced with death, a very controlled distant perspective sanitizes the images to simply "the bodies" or "the dead." There is very little description of these scenes beyond what the live characters are doing - "she touched his face and wept," but no mention of insects, of the smell, of soiled garments, of rot or carrion birds or rubbery cold skin. It's been a little surreal to go from reading books about the Holocaust written for adult readers by survivors or soldiers to these gentle and clean depictions specifically for younger readers.


message 17: by Jenna (new)

Jenna | 595 comments Possibly:
Just ran across The Girl With No Name and The Runaway Family which might fit


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