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SF&F Awards > 2016 Ditmar Award Winner Announced

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message 1: by [deleted user] (new)

The nominees for the 2016 Ditmar Award were announced. The Ditmar Award is presented annually by Australia's Nation Convention to the best SF&F works in the previous year (2015) by Australian authors and fans.

Nominees for Best Novel of 2015:
The Dagger's Path (The Forsaken Lands, #2) by Glenda Larke The Dagger's Path by Glenda Larke

Day Boy by Trent Jamieson Day Boy by Trent Jamieson

Graced by Amanda Pillar Graced by Amanda Pillar

Lament for the Afterlife by Lisa L. Hannett Lament for the Afterlife by Lisa L. Hannett

Zeroes (Zeroes, #1) by Scott Westerfeld Zeroes by Scott Westerfeld, Margo Lanagan & Deborah Biancotti

You can see the full list of nominees in other categories at SFsite's Ditmar announcement

(cf Aurealis Award for Australian authors.)


message 2: by [deleted user] (last edited Mar 22, 2016 11:32AM) (new)

It's confusing having two books titled "Zeroes" released in 2015. At least to me. :)

Overlap with the other Australian SF&F award, the Aurealis, include The Dagger's Path & Day Boy.

Westerfeld isn't Australian, but his two co-authors are.


message 3: by Classic SF Fan (new)

Classic SF Fan I wasnt aware of the Ditmar award. I recognise the Aurealis award from Worlds Without End, Sadly very few of these books are available from the public library here in
UK,which ,apart from the miraculous Internet Archive/Open Library is my main source for SF reads.
Just as well,I have enough effort working my way through the Hugos ,Nebulas,and Locus without adding yet another list to my TBR! lol


message 4: by [deleted user] (last edited Mar 22, 2016 12:55PM) (new)

Classic SF Fan wrote: "I wasnt aware of the Ditmar award. I recognise the Aurealis award from Worlds Without End, Sadly very few of these books are available from the public library here in UK, which , apart from the..."

The Ditmar is actually the older of the Australian awards, and is fan run; the Aurealis is only two decades old and is run by its namesake magazine (which makes it similar to Locus's awards, except Locus doesn't restrict itself to one country of origin.)

Based on reading over the last few years, I think the Aurealis deals with books I'm more likely to enjoy. (The last 3 years, The Rook (of which we had a group discussion), Lexicon & Peacemaker; though how they categorized any of those as science-fiction baffles me. :) Whereas, I haven't really enjoyed any of the Ditmar winners lately.

There are lots of other relatively obscure SF&F awards.


message 5: by Classic SF Fan (new)

Classic SF Fan Thanks for the info G33z3r,and the comparison with the Locus Award,very illuminating. I gave up long ago trying to puzzle out what is SF and what isnt,its become a real puzzle.
Personally I like the Locus awards quite a lot,they are often much more accessible reads than other awards in that the books are more accessible in libraries. Similar with the much despised NPR list,which the purists tend to denigrate,but at least,as a former SF reader who left the genre for decades, the NPR list is very much available in various formats So between the library and Open Libray I was able to locate no less than 99 of the books on the NPR for free..whereas quite a large number of Hugos etc are only available for money - and sometimes quite a lot of money!
I love the old books but as an old pensioner with many grandchildren,buying books is out of the question,and I sometimes go to those less prestigious but more populist lists when choosing books. After decades out of the genre I need to read an awful lot of books to catch up. Buying them would be prohibitive! :0)


message 6: by [deleted user] (last edited Mar 22, 2016 01:18PM) (new)

Classic SF Fan wrote: " I gave up long ago trying to puzzle out what is SF and what isnt,its become a real puzzle...."

I wouldn't try to split the genre except Aurealis gives separate awards for science fiction and fantasy, so it's a head scratcher when 3 sci-fi winners in a row are urban fantasy. (Though in the case of Peacemaker you can make an argument, since it's a near-future urban fantasy; in 2050 we have both flying cars and vampires. :)


Classic SF Fan wrote: "Personally I like the Locus awards quite a lot,they are often much more accessible reads than other awards in that the books are more accessible in libraries. Similar with the much despised NPR list..."

I'm fine with both the Locus Best SF List and the NPR top SF&F Lists. They are little different in that the Locus is selected by a specific and relatively knowledgeable set of fans, many of whom work in the genre, while the NPR list was assembled by open Internet voting. As I mentioned in the NPR Top SF Topic, I think that NPR list has a bit of a bias towards the more recent and towards media-related books, But it still seems to have found a lot of great material (though I can also complain about some omissions. :)


message 7: by [deleted user] (new)

Not to be outdone by the Aurealis Award announcement a couple of days ago, the Australian National Science Fiction Convention has announce the winner of its 2015 Ditmar Award:

Best Australian SF/F Novel of 2015:

Lament for the Afterlife by Lisa L. Hannett Lament for the Afterlife by Lisa L. Hannett


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