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Movies,Theater, Music, & Art > Art and artists - 2016

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message 1: by Alias Reader (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) | 19167 comments

Share with us your love of art. Learn something new? Heard some art news? Anything art related, we want to hear all about it!


message 2: by Alias Reader (last edited Dec 28, 2015 06:44AM) (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) | 19167 comments RIP Ellsworth Kelly, who passed away today at 92. Ellsworth Kelly (American, 1923-2015). Spectrum V, 1969.



Ellsworth Kelly (May 31, 1923 – December 27, 2015) was an American painter, sculptor, and printmaker associated with hard-edge painting, Color Field painting and the minimalist school. His works demonstrate unassuming techniques emphasizing simplicity of form, similar to the work of John McLaughlin and Kenneth Noland. Kelly often employed bright colors. He lived and worked in Spencertown, New York.


message 3: by madrano (new)

madrano | 11912 comments Thanks for sharing the photo. I remember his vivid works. RIP.


message 4: by Alias Reader (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) | 19167 comments You're welcome :)


message 5: by Carol (last edited Dec 29, 2015 06:16PM) (new)

Carol (goodreadscomcarolann) | 830 comments A few by Ellsworth Kelly, love his art.

https://barryraphael.files.wordpress....

http://media.gettyimages.com/photos/a...
Ellsworth & the Mississippi

http://www.artribune.com/wp-content/u...
The Mississippi


message 6: by Alias Reader (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) | 19167 comments Thanks for sharing that, Carol. I wasn't familiar with his work. I saw the notice of his passing on FB and though I would share.


message 7: by Alias Reader (last edited Jan 14, 2016 06:50PM) (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) | 19167 comments In honor of John Singer Sargent's birth on this date in 1856, a portrait image from the Frick Art Reference Library photoarchives, his 1905 oil portrait of Mrs. Joseph Pulitzer (Kate Davis) from a private collection.



~~~
The Frick Collection


message 8: by Madrano (last edited Jan 15, 2016 08:05AM) (new)

Madrano (madran) | 3732 comments Nice. I was lucky enough to visit the Frick in NYC with Alias Reader in 2010. For that reason alone the museum is special to me. The building is lovely, as is the art.


message 9: by Alias Reader (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) | 19167 comments :)

I thought of you when I posted, deb.


message 10: by Carol (new)

Carol (goodreadscomcarolann) | 830 comments Madrano wrote: "Nice. I was lucky enough to visit the Frick in NYC with Alias Reader in 2010. For that reason alone the museum is special to me. The building is lovely, as is the art."

I just love the Frick in NYC!!!


message 11: by Madrano (new)

Madrano (madran) | 3732 comments Nice to know we aren't alone in fondly remembering that day. I also think of you when thinking of the Brooklyn Museum. That is another good museum which i could visit again and again.


message 12: by Alias Reader (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) | 19167 comments I haven't been there in awhile. I need to go there one day and visit the three that are next to each other. Brooklyn museum, Botanical garden and Prospect Park. Maybe in the Spring.


message 13: by Carol (new)

Carol (goodreadscomcarolann) | 830 comments Madrano wrote: "Nice to know we aren't alone in fondly remembering that day. I also think of you when thinking of the Brooklyn Museum. That is another good museum which i could visit again and again."

I went with the other docents (Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art in Hartford, CT) and got the opportunity to see the Brooklyn Museum. It is a very large museum. Two things I remember: The Dinner Party by Judy Chicago, and two very large paintings of Russian soldiers, lying dead in the deep snow. (That one stayed with me.)


message 14: by Alias Reader (last edited Jan 17, 2016 01:35PM) (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) | 19167 comments Carol, Deb and I saw The Dinner Party. In the bookstore they sell a printout of all the various women in the exhibit. It would be a terrific resource for someone wanted to do research in that area.

Some of the statues are amazing.

You can see their collection online. Just click on Collection at this link to see more.

Here is one statue in particular that I love.
https://www.brooklynmuseum.org/openco...


message 15: by Madrano (new)

Madrano (madran) | 3732 comments It was a dream come true to see the Judy Chicago piece. I'd read and seen photos since the '70s but in person it is a fascination. And the history!

One thing i treasure about that museum is that topics seem in hand there. Seeing their Egyptian collection made me feel i could understand it, whereas seeing the Met's massive collection mostly overwhelmed me. It seemed as though there was too much to ever understand.


message 16: by Carol (last edited Jan 19, 2016 05:16PM) (new)

Carol (goodreadscomcarolann) | 830 comments I agree Madrano, it is huge building. I took my time to check out every piece, so happy to finally see all of it.

I really do miss being a docent, unfortunately it takes a lot of time for prepping, giving tours, and driving into the city (no parking when there is snow). They have a new director/CEO. I'm glad to be inside today. I get to avoid the snow, and writing at home.


message 17: by Madrano (new)

Madrano (madran) | 3732 comments The amount of time docents spend on learning about the museum they serve must be tremendous, as they usually can answer the oddest of questions. I think it would be a pleasure but also challenging. I certainly appreciate them.


message 18: by Alias Reader (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) | 19167 comments Happy Birthday to Ansel Adams! Born today in 1902, the nature photographer and environmentalist was famous for his crisp black and white landscapes of the American West.



Ansel Adams: 400 Photographs by Ansel Adams

Ansel Adams: An Autobiography

Ansel Adams at 100 by John Szarkowski

Ansel Adams: A Biography by Mary Street Alinder


message 19: by madrano (new)

madrano | 11912 comments The crispness is awesome. He is my favorite photographer of nature.


message 20: by [deleted user] (last edited Mar 03, 2016 02:52PM) (new)

What is art but its setting. "Pearls before swine".

I hardly ever get art, but children's books with their illustrations nearly always delight me. When I became a man, I became a bigger child. Neil Gaiman has found the most fantastic collaborators to work with. The Tragical Comedy or Comical Tragedy of Mr. Punch is a case in point and newly rereleased. It came to my local library only this year. I snapped it up first. Bugger the teeny boppers.


message 21: by Madrano (new)

Madrano (madran) | 3732 comments We can't let them have all the fun art, right?


message 22: by Larry (new)

Larry | 488 comments A great article about Picasso's art. So what did Picasso leave behind? 45,000 works and five surviving heirs, some of whom really don't like each other.

"Now 80 years old, she lives in Paris, has three children, and is one of Picasso’s five surviving heirs, all of whom have become multi-millionaires. The other heirs are Claude Picasso and his sister, Paloma, the children of Pablo and his mistress Françoise Gilot, the only woman who ever left him; and Marina and Bernard Picasso, the children of Paulo, who died in 1975. Since one of Picasso’s paintings, Les Femmes d’Alger (Version O) (Maya had watched him paint it), set a record last year for a work sold at auction ($179.4 million), the five Picasso heirs—who control the art world’s richest dynasty—are likely to become even richer."

http://www.vanityfair.com/culture/201...


message 23: by Alias Reader (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) | 19167 comments Larry wrote: "A great article about Picasso's art. So what did Picasso leave behind? 45,000 works and five surviving heirs, some of whom really don't like each other.

"Now 80 years old, she lives in Paris, has ..."


Thanks for posting this. I will pass this on to an artist friend of mine. I know she will enjoy the article.


message 24: by madrano (new)

madrano | 11912 comments We visited a Barcelona, Spain, museum about Picasso, particularly his early years. It exhibited thousands of items. They were pretty honest about stating that toward the end his signature was what sold a piece. Indeed, years ago i read that toward the end of his life he paid bills by check because many people wouldn't cash them. As DH said, it must have played havoc with his checking accounting.


message 25: by Alias Reader (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) | 19167 comments In remembrance of Vincent van Gogh on his 163rd birthday
(March 30, 1853 – July 29, 1890, aged 37).

don mclean - vincent
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4wrNF...








message 26: by Alias Reader (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) | 19167 comments Vincent Van Gogh, born on this date in 1853




message 27: by madrano (new)

madrano | 11912 comments If we didn't like his art, on the board, we at least love his philosophy. Thanks for the quote, Alias.


message 28: by Shomeret (new)

Shomeret | 227 comments Alias Reader wrote: "In remembrance of Vincent van Gogh on his 163rd birthday
(March 30, 1853 – July 29, 1890, aged 37).

don mclean - vincent
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4wrNF...

"


Don McLean's song Vincent still gives me chills and makes me cry.


message 29: by Alias Reader (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) | 19167 comments I agree, Shomeret. It's a very poignant tribute.


message 30: by Alias Reader (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) | 19167 comments Leonardo da Vinci was born 564 years ago today.




Wiki--
Leonardo di ser Piero da Vinci, more commonly Leonardo da Vinci or simply Leonardo ; 15 April 1452 – 2 May 1519), was an Italian polymath whose areas of interest included invention, painting, sculpting, architecture, science, music, mathematics, engineering, literature, anatomy, geology, astronomy, botany, writing, history, and cartography. He has been variously called the father of paleontology, ichnology, and architecture, and is widely considered one of the greatest painters of all time. Sometimes credited with the inventions of the parachute, helicopter and tank, his genius epitomized the Renaissance humanist ideal.


message 31: by Ashley Marie (new)

Ashley Marie Last night's final Jeopardy question dealt with the American Gothic painting, probably one of the easiest final Jeopardy's I've ever seen :)


message 32: by Alias Reader (last edited May 12, 2016 04:25PM) (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) | 19167 comments Ashley *Hufflepuff Kitten* wrote: "Last night's final Jeopardy question dealt with the American Gothic painting, probably one of the easiest final Jeopardy's I've ever seen :)"

I DVR Jeopardy. I probably watch it tonight. I love skipping by the commercials.

When it's a special week, the questions are easier.
(teachers, celebrities, etc.)


message 33: by madrano (new)

madrano | 11912 comments We used to be faithful watchers of "Jeopardy". Then we got cable & it just seemed there was so much more "out there." Alias, good idea to dvr it.


message 34: by Alias Reader (last edited Jun 13, 2016 08:20AM) (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) | 19167 comments Deb, I DVR everything. I seldom watch a show when it is on as I hate commercials. It also allows me to skip parts of shows I don't have interest in.


message 35: by madrano (new)

madrano | 11912 comments How i miss our DVR!


message 36: by Alias Reader (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) | 19167 comments A loving remembrance of astrophysicist Vera Rubin, who confirmed the existence of dark matter, paved the way for women in science, and died without the Nobel Prize she so clearly deserves.
https://www.brainpickings.org/2016/12...

This original piece of art by Debbie Millman celebrates some of Rubin's final words in felt letters against a painted background featuring the hand-lettered abstract of Rubin's groundbreaking paper on galaxy rotation. The piece is available as a print, with all proceeds benefitting the Association for Women in Science:




message 37: by Alias Reader (last edited Dec 28, 2016 09:20PM) (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) | 19167 comments A friend of mine is reading and enjoying this book on Monet. I thought I would share the title with you.

Mad Enchantment Claude Monet and the Painting of the Water Lilies by Ross King Mad Enchantment: Claude Monet and the Painting of the Water Lilies~~~Ross King

From bestselling author Ross King, a brilliant portrait of legendary artist Claude Monet and the story of his most memorable achievement, the water lilies.

Claude Monet is perhaps the world’s most beloved artist, and among all his creations, the paintings of the water lilies in his garden at Giverny are most famous. Seeing them in museums around the world, viewers are transported by the power of Monet’s brush into a peaceful world of harmonious nature. Monet himself intended them to provide “an asylum of peaceful meditation.” Yet, as Ross King reveals in his magisterial chronicle of both artist and masterpiece, these beautiful canvases belie the intense frustration Monet experienced at the difficulties of capturing the fugitive effects of light, water, and color. They also reflect the terrible personal torments Monet suffered in the last dozen years of his life.

Mad Enchantment tells the full story behind the creation of the Water Lilies, as the horrors of World War I came ever closer to Paris and Giverny, and a new generation of younger artists, led by Henri Matisse and Pablo Picasso, were challenging the achievements of Impressionism. By early 1914, French newspapers were reporting that Monet, by then 73 and one of the world’s wealthiest, most celebrated painters, had retired his brushes. He had lost his beloved wife, Alice, and his eldest son, Jean. His famously acute vision--what Paul Cezanne called "the most prodigious eye in the history of painting"--was threatened by cataracts. And yet, despite ill health, self-doubt, and advancing age, Monet began painting again on a more ambitious scale than ever before. Linking great artistic achievement to the personal and historical dramas unfolding around it, Ross King presents the most intimate and revealing portrait of an iconic figure in world culture--from his lavish lifestyle and tempestuous personality to his close friendship with the fiery war leader Georges Clemenceau, who regarded the Water Lilies as one of the highest expressions of the human spirit.

Hardcover: 416 pages
Publisher: Bloomsbury USA; First Edition edition (September 6, 2016)


message 38: by Larry (new)

Larry | 488 comments The best art book that I bought this year was easily Florence: The Paintings and Frescoes in the City that Invented Art, 1250-1743. The only thing I don't like about the book is that it's so inclusive that it's so heavy that if you drop it on your foot, you'll probably break it ... your foot, that is.

This book follows the two similar books devoted to all the paintings in the Louvre and all the paintings in the Vatican. Here's the blurb from Amazon.com for this newer book:

"This is the most comprehensive book on the paintings and frescoes of Florence ever undertaken, with nearly 2,000 beautifully reproduced artworks from the city's great museums and churches-produced in the same manner as BD&L's The Louvre and The Vatican. ... Every painted work that is on display in the Uffizi Gallery, The Pitti Palace, the Accademia, and the Duomo is included in the book, plus many or most of the works from 28 of the city's other magnificent museums and churches."


message 39: by Alias Reader (last edited Dec 29, 2016 07:40AM) (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) | 19167 comments Larry wrote: "The best art book that I bought this year was easily Florence: The Paintings and Frescoes in the City that Invented Art, 1250-1743. The only thing I don't like about the book is tha..."

Thanks, Larry. My friend and neighbor is an artist. I'll pass along the title to her.

EDIT--- Yikes! I see the book is a $51- $75 on Amazon. Unfortunately, my library doesn't carry it. I am sure it's beautiful but that would be out of her budget. :( I'll keep an eye out for it though when I go to used book sales. You never know. :)

I lucked out once and found a Annie Leibovitz book of her work in pristine condition for $1.


message 40: by madrano (new)

madrano | 11912 comments Great Rubin quote & work of art. I'm glad you shared both, Alias.

Larry, that book sounds like a dream. There is so much art in Florence alone, let alone any other city in Italy, one could retire there & never see it all. Well, maybe you could but by then i would want to start all over. When we were there we only went to the Uffizi but so many of those works are still fresh in my mind. We missed much there. Thanks for the title. Hope my library has it.

Alias, thanks for the review & title of King's latest. I've read two by him--The Judgment of Paris: The Revolutionary Decade That Gave the World Impressionism and Brunelleschi's Dome. Both were terrific, full of material from which i took a number of notes. Good writer.


message 41: by Larry (new)

Larry | 488 comments Alias Reader wrote: "Larry wrote: "The best art book that I bought this year was easily Florence: The Paintings and Frescoes in the City that Invented Art, 1250-1743. The only thing I don't like about t..."

Don't know if it helps but COSTCO sometimes has the three art books, and when they have them they're only about $45. We bought the earlier, Vatican: All the Paintings: The Complete Collection of Old Masters, Plus More than 300 Sculptures, Maps, Tapestries, and other Artifacts and Louvre: All the Paintings a few weeks ago for my sister-in-law for Christmas ... one for this year and one for next year.


message 42: by Alias Reader (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) | 19167 comments Good to know. I don't belong to COSTCO but she may know someone who does. Thanks !


message 43: by madrano (new)

madrano | 11912 comments I've only glanced at the books at Costco so didn't realize they had nice ones on art. Usually what i see are thee latest popular books and children's books.


message 44: by Alias Reader (last edited Dec 30, 2016 07:52AM) (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) | 19167 comments madrano wrote: "I've only glanced at the books at Costco so didn't realize they had nice ones on art. Usually what i see are thee latest popular books and children's books."

My niece belongs and that is all I've seen, too. Though I've only been there a handful of times with her. Since she is not a book person so I usually try not to linger at the books too long.


message 45: by madrano (new)

madrano | 11912 comments We belonged for a year but didn't buy enough to make it worth the investment. Living on the road does that. :-)


message 46: by Alias Reader (last edited Dec 30, 2016 07:58AM) (new)

Alias Reader (aliasreader) | 19167 comments madrano wrote: " Living on the road does that. :-)"

Deb, I think of you and your DH when I see the current TV commercial that has Willy Nelson in it and he's in a car as the music plays his song, On The Road Again.

I liked it so much I downloaded it to my iPod. So now I play it as I walk on the treadmill at the gym. :)


Willie Nelson "On the Road Again" 2017 Volkswagen Passat TV Commercial
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zMsG4...


message 47: by madrano (new)

madrano | 11912 comments LOL--we sing that song (well, a bar or two) many times as we leave a town after an overnight visit. It's freedom moving us along.


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