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message 1: by J.D. (new)

J.D. Dudycha | 39 comments Hey everyone, I was wondering if any of you have used advertising on Twitter. After every follow, of course I get a private message that says, "If you'd like to advertise on my site, click here."

I am wondering if any of you have actually advertised with a site, and if you had any luck.


message 2: by J.J. (new)

J.J. Mainor No, but every now and then, I'll reply to the advertised tweets to spam it with my own ad. Strangely enough people do read the replies, so I end up with the advertising without paying for it.


message 3: by [deleted user] (new)

I haven't but once I get a little more popular i was thinking about creating a Twitter. Right now I'm just using a Wordpress Blog and Facebook Page to get my name out there.


message 4: by Wisteria (new)

Wisteria Kitsune (wisteriakitsune) it's just another advertising venue. i've been on it for a few weeks now to see how authors use it. i think that the authors that use it successfully are the ones that build a brand--not just talk about whatever suits their fancy, but about their genre (for example, sci fi)--and stick to it.

although spamming about your book--or paying for that service--does work to some extent, i don't like it and i've un-followed those people.

I've mentioned my wattpad experiment maybe 3 or 4 times when I've updated it. i did an experiment last week and mentioned an update only on twitter w/a link to only the 3rd part (which was by accident) in my wattpad short and saw a few more reads in that 3rd part only.


message 5: by Christina (new)

Christina McMullen (cmcmullen) Most of the services that send yoy the auto-DMs, especially those that followed you first, are padding their numbers with authors as followers. Some are free and sure, it may look as though there's no harm in adding your book to their site, but be mindful of their practices. Several of these sites will use the @ spam tactic of tweeting to individuals. This is a good way to anger your potential audience. I and many others will block and report these services for direct spamming.

If you are expected to pay, forget it, you're just paying someone to spam on your behalf.


message 6: by [deleted user] (new)

Good to know...


message 7: by Justin (new)

Justin (justinbienvenue) | 787 comments Seeing as Twitter works differently than Facebook I would assume that their ad's are also different. Lately I've really been grasping the concept of Twitter and the whole hashtag thing but I'm not sure I'd try the ads. I'd have to see it in action and I'm sure I have and haven't even noticed.


message 8: by Ken (new)

Ken Doggett (kendoggett) I just experienced something new on Twitter--at least it's new to me, and something I do not advise any author to do. Another author attached a question to one of my book tweets, and then came back with "OMG! I just realized I'm talking to THE Ken Doggett! What an honor!" Since I'm not Stephen King, my immediate thought was sounds fishy. Eventually he spammed me by direct message about his book, and that's when I blocked him. Doing something like that is not only un-cool, but to me it's a sign of desperation.


message 9: by T.L. (new)

T.L. Clark (tlcauthor) | 727 comments My Twitter ad campaign is the only one so far which has generated sales for me (and not many).

But yes, you do have to back your ads up with sociable posts, and interacting with others. Nobody wants to be on there and only sold to.

Sadly, my newsfeed is increasingly getting bombarded with ads though :-/

fb has been a great way for me to find other authors and join support groups (as has GR). It's really nice to see others are going through the same thing, and makes me feel less lonely/isolated.


message 10: by Angel (last edited Dec 23, 2015 08:21AM) (new)

Angel | 216 comments I advised against it. I learned quickly on Twitter that's a quick way to lose followers. I have learned from Amanda Hocking's advice, it's best to share mutual interests, instead of promoting your book. Twitter followers respond better to that. I found it to be true. I've gained a lot more followers and retweets that way.


message 11: by Ken (last edited Dec 23, 2015 08:57AM) (new)

Ken Doggett (kendoggett) I don't mind promos on the news feed; if you follow authors, or anyone else with a product to sell, you have to expect that. I do mind when they send it by direct message.


message 12: by Shari (new)

Shari Sakurai (shari_sakurai) | 64 comments Ken wrote: "I don't mind promos on the news feed; if you follow authors, or anyone else with a product to sell, you have to expect that. I do mind when they send it by direct message."

Yeah same here. I do tend to unfollow users who DM me with promo posts.

With marketing on Twitter I've used the paid advertising a few times. I get a couple of sales and some new followers each time but like with most advertising I haven't had huge amounts of sales.


message 13: by William (new)

William Morgenstein (httpswwwthecrazylifeofbillcom) I can understand the objection to advertising sent by direct message but on the other hand what is an author to do? For the limited royalties paying for the cost of advertising in the 'Social' media is unprofitable. What I usually do is mention that I have written an auto-bio, which mentioning the title. If the recipient is interested they will ask for the name or go into my bio to research it. Or, I might say something like "I knew so and so who is one of your friends and have written about him in my book".


message 14: by Alicia (new)

Alicia Hooper | 2 comments I don't recommend it. My Twitter is in it's infant stages, but I think people receive you better if you Tweet about your interests/life outside of your books. Twitter has resulted in exactly 0 book sales for me (I don't blame people for not buying it, I hate ads too). Additionally, people are more interested in conversation, not marketing stuff.

Users who clog my feed with book marketing posts get unfollowed. Worst of all, spam posts attract spam followers and ain't nobody got time for dat...


message 15: by Bekka (new)

Bekka Samantha wrote: "I haven't but once I get a little more popular i was thinking about creating a Twitter. Right now I'm just using a Wordpress Blog and Facebook Page to get my name out there."

Twitter's like anything else - it takes time to build a following. So, might be worth starting a Twitter account now and posting to build a following over time. Then, you'll have a name when you want it.....


message 16: by M.A. (last edited May 17, 2016 12:36AM) (new)

M.A. Corliss | 11 comments Twitter ads have been very useful to me about as useful as Facebook ads. They not only generated the majority of my book sales but also have allowed me to obtain more and more followers with each ad that I put out. I would recommend them to anyone.

My only beef with Twitter ads is that you have to go through a couple hoops to get to the ad page, unlike facebook, who has an App. A minor complaint, it would just be a lot better if Twitter also had an app for their Ads


message 17: by Ken (last edited May 17, 2016 06:17AM) (new)

Ken (kendoyle) | 364 comments M.A. wrote: "Twitter ads have been very useful to me about as useful as Facebook ads...."

I haven't tried either, but I've been considering FB ads. I do find both of them mildly annoying, as a user, so that may be why I've been reluctant to use them as an advertiser.

Have your Twitter ads returned a profit--i.e., have you made more in sales than you've spent on advertising?


message 18: by Owen (new)

Owen O'Neill (owen_r_oneill) | 1509 comments We never tried twitter ads per se, but we did try a book promo service that would send out tweets on our behalf (Ask David) that claimed around 40,000 followers at the time. We used this service for about 6 months. The results were zero.

Other people have tweeted about our books and this appears to have gotten results, in at least a few cases. However, our conclusion is that our readership does not look to twitter to find new books.

Our rule on considering any advertising is that if we find it annoying -- or ignore it -- so will our readers.


message 19: by Segilola (new)

Segilola Salami (segilolasalami) | 108 comments people forget that social media is there for you to be social not for you to sell.

the other day, someone reached out to me on twitter asking if I had plans for another book. that is what social media is there for in my opinion. I find that Twitter and Facebook (to a lesser extent) send a great deal of traffic to my website via my blog. This increases the chances of people actually buying my book.

For now my thoughts are that ads are there to make the providers money and not necessarily the vendor.


message 20: by Segilola (new)

Segilola Salami (segilolasalami) | 108 comments on this post http://www.segilolasalami.co.uk/incre... I share the analytics of one of my tweets. I think you would find it interesting


message 21: by C.B. (new)

C.B. Matson | 143 comments Ken wrote ...then came back with "OMG! I just realized I'm talking to THE Ken Doggett! What an honor!"

I can just imagine your first rush... then: "WTH?" And finally: "Crap! I've just been had."

Hate those flang-dang scammers, but who knows, some day... some day? Maybe prophetic...


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