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Internal conflict

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message 1: by Vincenzo (new) - added it

Vincenzo Spiniello Towards the end of the book, Ponyboy was sick and had a concussion, and one of the Soc. Randy came to visit him. During this visit Ponyboy was saying how Johnny didn't kill Bob but he did. You know this is not true, so I looked at this more carefully. In my perspective on the situation, I decided that Ponyboy must be going through an internal conflict. Internal conflict is a problem going through a characters head. His internal conflict is dealing with the fact Johnny is dead and he actually killed Bob, not himself. From a readers perspective, you can see why he might want to take the fall for his friend. Comment below.


message 2: by Josh (new) - added it

Josh Fader Yes I think that the grief of Johnny's death is the internal conflict that Ponyboy is dealing with and it was to much for him that he didn't want to believe it. This lead to him trying to believe that he was the one who did it because it was hard for Ponyboy to process this information.


Liam An example of an external conflict is between Darry and Ponyboy


Divson 25 Liam wrote: "An example of an external conflict is between Darry and Ponyboy"

True, especially when they fight


message 5: by BiGBEN (new)

BiGBEN Yes. I think it's interesting how even though they fight a lot it is only because Darry loves Ponyboy.


Divson 25 BiGBEN wrote: "Yes. I think it's interesting how even though they fight a lot it is only because Darry loves Ponyboy."

It is weird isn't it


Darren Judge The conflict between Darry and Pony is very interesting.


CleaPatra Liam wrote: "An example of an external conflict is between Darry and Ponyboy"

True, although I feel that there was also internal conflict with them. This is shown at the beginning of the book, when Ponyboy didn't know if Darry loved him. He also wasn't sure whether to care. To some extent, Darry was also conflicted. It was made clear he was conflicted whether Ponyboy would come back or not.


Liam It said in the book that Darry loved Ponyboy a lot and that he fought with Ponyboy to show that he cares. Underneath it all, he is extremely caring of Ponyboy.


message 10: by Liam (new) - rated it 5 stars

Liam PLZ stop copying my text thing


message 11: by Liam (new) - rated it 5 stars

Liam There is another external conflict and this conflict is between the two groups, the Socs and the greasers. These groups are polar opposites with the greasers being people with long, greasy hair with dirty and ripped shirts and with the Socs being rich people with lots of fancy clothes, short hair, and cool cars like mustangs.


message 12: by Vincenzo (new) - added it

Vincenzo Spiniello That is a good example of external conflict Liam I like it.


David Hay I completely agree with liam and Cenz but I have to say, they aren't necessarily POLAR opposites,they are just basically unknown what they areally are inside. For example; Randy turns out to be a good person and says that Socs have problems as well and that they are real people as well. Next, there is Cherry who even said to Pony that Bob was a good person, a leader, but he got carried away sometimes and that Pony just didn't know the other side of him. Lastly, wealth doesn't really make a difference to the greasers and the Socs and they like most of the same things they just don't necessarily get along because they don't know each other as much as it is needed.


Tyler Griff I think an internal conflict is near the end of the book for Dally. Because when Johnny died, Dally felt like the only thing he could do was get himself killed


David Hay I agree with Tyler, this is very true including the events leading up to this phenomenon. Plus, Dally always is caring for Johnny whenever he needs it (besides at the movie theater) I also think that this is great because of the struggles that they have to go through together and that Dally went into a burning building to save Johnny, and he wouldn't have gone in if he needed to save those 10 or so kids.


message 16: by Vincenzo (new) - added it

Vincenzo Spiniello I didn't mean to say that Socs and greasers are polar opposites. I just wanted to agree with Liam, that they're are very different from each other. In the text S.E. Hinton gives a lot of examples in the book of how these two groups are different in the story. So I agree with both of you. Thanks for the feedback.


message 17: by Liam (new) - rated it 5 stars

Liam Yay someone agreed with me!!!!!!


message 18: by Liam (new) - rated it 5 stars

Liam David wrote: "I completely agree with liam and Cenz but I have to say, they aren't necessarily POLAR opposites,they are just basically unknown what they areally are inside. For example; Randy turns out to be a g..."
My name is uppercased David!!!


David Hay I dont care
Sorry xD


message 20: by Josh (new)

Josh Wise Another Internal conflict would be that Johnny is not sure whether to kill himself or not.


message 21: by Jack (new) - rated it 5 stars

Jack Yeah, he was constantly deciding on whether to kill himself or not. It was so sad when he died!!! :(


message 22: by Vincenzo (new) - added it

Vincenzo Spiniello Thank you Liam for agreeing because we are totally right. David we meant to say that they are very different from each other. They also live very different lifestyles. Which doesn't mean that they are polar opposites. They are very different from each other. Any other comments.


message 23: by Josh (new) - added it

Josh Fader When josh said "Another Internal conflict would be that Johnny is not sure whether to kill himself or not." I agree with you because Johnny's home life is terrible and abusive and he is always nervous out on the streets. But at the same time, he has the gang to live for which is practically family so that must tear him apart.


message 24: by Jack (new) - rated it 5 stars

Jack I agree with Josh, Johnny's home life offered no future for him so he had to turn to the gang for help and to offer a future for him. He was always afraid to walk around town because at any moment a Soc could pop out at him and jump him.


message 25: by Josh (new)

Josh Wise How about now we talk about climaxes and resolutions?


David Hay I agree as well because of his rough homelife mostly. For example; his parents beat him, hurt him, ignored him, and did some things that are inappropriate for parents to do while they have their kids around. But, he also had a different force. The gang was basically his non-default family which loved him and took care of him in need. It even says in the book that he was the gang's pet, everyone's kid brother. In conclusion I totally agree :D


message 27: by Jack (new) - rated it 5 stars

Jack Ok, I feel like the climax of the story was when the church was burning and Ponyboy and Johnny ran in to save those kids. It really revealed character and helped to add to the claim that Johnny and Ponyboy are both dynamic characters.


message 28: by Cole (new)

Cole M. The climax in this book is definitely when johny and dally are dying and then finally when they do die, it is resolved


message 29: by Josh (last edited Dec 14, 2015 10:19AM) (new) - added it

Josh Fader I don't think that is exactly true that the resolution is Johnny and Dally dying because the gang still has to deal with all the grief of losing both of them. It is even worse because both of them died in one night. They resolution is when all of the problems are solved and saying once Dally and Johnny finally die, the problem is gone. That is saying that Dally and Johnny are the actual problem. The true resolution is when Ponyboy writes the Outsiders as the theme for his project because he is finally ready to be open about what happened and the grief has washed over.


message 30: by Josh (new)

Josh Wise I think that the climax starts when the church gets on fire, and Ponyboy, Johnny, and Darry all jump in to save the kids. Then, that leads too Johnny getting hurt, and then adventually his death. Also, the death slows down the book a little, so that is part of the resolution. Although, another part of the resolution is when Dally kills himself.


David Hay I agree with Josh because he does have a point. I think the theme for the project was the Outsiders is the climax because it is that final moment when you think, wow, this is what actually happened the whole time. Also, it basically sums up both of those situations.


message 32: by Cole (new)

Cole M. maybe the first part of what you said is true but i don't think that it is all the way at the end i think that the place where at least Ponyboy got some consolation is when he found the book gone with the wind with the letter inside from johnny which was sort of a death note saying that he didnt want ponyboy to stress about his death.


message 33: by Jack (new) - rated it 5 stars

Jack I disagree, I feel that Johnny's death was apart of the falling action because that is when everything started to lower and fade away and all of the greasers realized the connections that they had with Johnny. The resolution was when Ponyboy was asked to write the journal entry on something important to him and he realized that he would write it on the whole greaser story (the outsiders) because that is when the book came to a close.


message 34: by Josh (new)

Josh Wise I believe this all. Also, I am starting to think the whole book, and the world they live in is the climax or conflict, but it gets resolved when Johnny, and Dally die, but also when Ponyboy gets the note from Johnny in Gone With The Wind


David Hay I think the answer is an agreement between Josh's and Jack's theories on the climax. I think it could be both because they both have the frightening effect of "is this all a story by Pony?!?!" Then, it comes to you that this is what you have been waiting for, the surprise of the whole story, that last detail you were craving.


message 36: by Josh (new)

Josh Wise Yes David! I agree!


message 37: by Josh (new)

Josh Wise Check out my discussion on everything for Fortunately the Milk!


David Hay Ok, I will


message 39: by Liam (new) - rated it 5 stars

Liam Ok. Hello and Goodbye


message 40: by Liam (new) - rated it 5 stars

Liam Pony is weird. He does not like baloney


message 41: by Josh (new) - added it

Josh Fader I think that the reason Ponyboy does not like baloney is because that was the only thing that was available at the church after Johnny got it a a market. The baloney represented the isolation and the plain and boring time spent at the church. After this event Ponyboy does not want to eat baloney because it reminds him of the event plus, Johnny was almost killed and severely injured at the church. So because of the time spent at the church eating baloney, it represents a symbol of isolation and the boring time there and therefore Ponyboy does not eat it.


Tyler Griff I agree with Josh


message 43: by Josh (new)

Josh Wise yes, but also no. If he just didn't like it because he was at the church he probably would've eaten it, but he didn't eat eat so he probably just doesn't like baloney in general.


Tyler Griff I feel like the climax starts when Johnny kills Bob because then everything becomes very hectic and serious.


Tyler Griff And that's when Johnny and Ponyboy go to Windrixville so the fuzz won't find them.


message 46: by Jack (new) - rated it 5 stars

Jack Do you think that Ponyboy liked his overall experience at the church besides the fact that it burned down? I think he did


David Hay I half agree. I think this does have to do with the climax, but it is the main piece of evidence in the rising action of this story. For example; this killing leads into Johnny and Pony running away. And them running away, basically results in the whole entire rest of the story, So I think this is just a major part of the rising action.


message 48: by Cole (new)

Cole M. Me too. Except that in the story when dally was giving them supplies , he said for them to get supplies imediettly and to get bologna. So even though what you said was true, he was not forced to get it but was told to get it, and as we already know, johnny and dally have a half secret relationship. So this was a choice.


message 49: by Josh (new) - added it

Josh Fader I disagree, I think the climax is when Johnny is hit by the wooden beam in the fire because all the other events is the rising action building up to that very single action. Although it does seem logical that the climax would be when Johnny kills Bob, everything after that would be the falling action, but after that event in the church, the action seems to fall until the resolution.


message 50: by Jack (new) - rated it 5 stars

Jack I agree, when Johnny went into the church, that is when everything started to change physically (the rumble) and emotionally (everyone realized their connection with Johnny). And then apart of the falling action is the rumble because that is when everything settles down and resolves itself.


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