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Low Town (Low Town, #1)
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Group Reads Discussions > Low Town Trilogy [Spoilers]

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message 1: by Chompa, Founding Father (new) - rated it 5 stars

Chompa | 477 comments Mod
This is for those happy folk who read the entire series instead of just the first book. Spoilers may fly fast and free.


message 2: by Chompa, Founding Father (new) - rated it 5 stars

Chompa | 477 comments Mod
It is pretty obvious this is only a trilogy isn't it?

The Warden's death didn't surprise me too much as he was expecting it, but then toward the end it seemed like maybe he'd actually get away.

Adolphus dying was a shock that made me cuss out loud.

Also - the revelation of what caused him to leave the secret police was quite interesting. He had never shown much of an interest in women through the series and can now see why.


message 3: by Mel (new) - rated it 3 stars

Mel | 88 comments The Warden's death didn't surprise me too much as he was expecting it, but then toward the end it seemed like maybe he'd actually get away.
..."


It was at 52% of the book, where the Warden was discussing how he was the only "real Low Town-er" and then the witch told him that he is never leaving either. At that point, I was convinced he would die. If we had the thread then, I would have come here to place a bet.


message 4: by Tracey the Lizard Queen, First In, Last Out (new) - rated it 4 stars

Tracey the Lizard Queen | 573 comments Mod
It would be awesome if Polansky did a book about Wren sometime in the future.


message 5: by Chompa, Founding Father (new) - rated it 5 stars

Chompa | 477 comments Mod
I agree. If the series was to continue in some manner, I think Wren is the likely way to go.


message 6: by Tracey the Lizard Queen, First In, Last Out (new) - rated it 4 stars

Tracey the Lizard Queen | 573 comments Mod
You always got the sense that the Warden would never leave Low Town, but I was a little surprised it was Guisgard. Didn't think he had the stomach for it.


message 7: by Chompa, Founding Father (new) - rated it 5 stars

Chompa | 477 comments Mod
I agree. He didn't seem to have the ambition. I guess he was just good at hiding his ambition and ruthlessness, which I guess makes him well qualified.


message 8: by Mel (new) - rated it 3 stars

Mel | 88 comments I was just pissed that they killed Adolphus. It seems as if the death was written only to hurt the Warden.


Brittany | 552 comments Mod
Yea I definitely re-read the entry to the chapter where Adolfus dies several times cussing. I knew as soon as I took a shining to the Warden he was as good as dead. he wouldn't have survived a normal life playing daddy anyways. I love to go about Wren but I won't be suprised if I never see it. They made it seem Wren was destined for a different path and the only reason he killed was for the warden and even then he was sick over it and didn't enjoy it. I thought it was fitting for it to be Guiscard in the end but I didn't see it coming. It definitely made him the perfect replacement for the old man.
Ever notice that almost everyone is depicted as straight up ugly minus Celia, Albertine, and the the officers? Usually just the gay ones come to think of it. He even makes it a point to describe their pig noses, squat bodies, beady slanty eyes, etc... Seriously everyone in low town seems hideous. Was that the point?


Brittany | 552 comments Mod
When I first started reading I commented on the urban slang cracking me up. As it progressed it sometimes felt more familiar. When Polansky wrote that a character "dipped" down an alleyway, I was immediately transported back to the 90s and no longer suprised at his age. We were practically school mates hahaha


message 11: by Chompa, Founding Father (new) - rated it 5 stars

Chompa | 477 comments Mod
Brittany, I did notice that most of the people were ugly. I also note that this was from the Warden's point of view. He seemed to see the ugly side of things quite well.


Brittany | 552 comments Mod
Chompa wrote: "Brittany, I did notice that most of the people were ugly. I also note that this was from the Warden's point of view. He seemed to see the ugly side of things quite well."

That is a really good point!


message 13: by Levi (new) - rated it 5 stars

Levi (levi66) | 44 comments Wow! I loved the mix of fantasy and hardboiled crime. The Warden is not a great man. He's been brought low by his own mistakes and addictions. He's a cynic and a misanthrope. He's self-demeaning and self-pitying. However, in each installment of this series, he acts from a deep-down desire to do some good. I like the Warden because he's a better person than he thinks he is.

The prose has a biting cleverness to it that is a combination of Joe Abercrombie and Terry Pratchett. Every description and every nuance is filtered through Warden's cynical and self-pitying point of view. As Chompa pointed out, the Warden is a broken man, and he sees everything around him as broken and ugly. I wonder if a more optimistic narrator would describe the same scenes in more pleasant or uplifting terms.


message 14: by Chompa, Founding Father (new) - rated it 5 stars

Chompa | 477 comments Mod
Levi, I think you nailed it.


message 15: by Phil (new) - rated it 4 stars

Phil A | 18 comments One thing that struck me was how Warden handled The Rhymer's betrayal. Several times the Warden let's us know that he has killed many people for menial cause. Yet, he moves himself to reason, accept and quasi-forgive Rhymer.

I know Rhymer's death is imminent anyway, but the Warden didn't act the way I expected. Now that I think of it, he did the same for Albertine. Perhaps learning to forgive is what the Warden needed to do in preparation to meet She Who Waits?


message 16: by Chompa, Founding Father (new) - rated it 5 stars

Chompa | 477 comments Mod
I think Albertine is THE exception to the rule. While he never says it, I believe he loved Albertine. He loved her enough to throw away his career and slide into a decade of drinking and drugs.

The Rhymer was probably more complicated. Yes, he was dying and he was also one the Warden's only friends, but I think there was also the fact that the Warden knew he was leaving Low Town (one way or the other). With leaving he didn't have to worry about leaving enemies/betrayers alive. He didn't have to worry about maintaining his bad-ass reputation. Those things wouldn't matter as he was shortly going to be leaving.


message 17: by Mel (last edited Dec 18, 2015 10:21AM) (new) - rated it 3 stars

Mel | 88 comments Well, I think that (following the entire noir genre thread) Warden is the archetype of the detective, who is rough and violent and deeply broken, yet he has this little circle of people that he loves deeply and he would die for them and he would forgive them anything, even if not easily. I believe that if Adolphus betrayed him, the Warden would have forgiven him. Same for Wren. Same for Rhymer. For Warden, killing a random person in the street might not cost anything, but being betrayed by one of his "core people" would be devastating. That is what happened with Albertine. As Chompa said, for some reason or another, he really loved her and when he got betrayed, he was destroyed. And yet, he was still not able to betray her back or kill her at the end. He just let her go (and with his dying breath wished that she got away).


Brittany | 552 comments Mod
Yancy only really cared about his mom and was willing to betray his mate to protect her. I think The Warden understood that, as he was doing the same at that moment to protect the ones he loved and get them out safely. As the Warden became resolved in his decision to die for his loved ones he understood why Yancy did what he did.


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