Mrs. Schuet's AP Literature Class of '16 discussion

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Crime and Punishment by Fyodor Dostoevsky

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message 1: by Elizabeth (new)

Elizabeth | 4 comments I chose this book because of a recommendation from my dad, who said I would enjoy the drama and the plot. Currently I am on page 20 and have just met Raskolnikov. I am intrigued by the stream of consciousness style the book uses sometimes, despite it being written from a third person point of view.


message 2: by Daniel (new)

Daniel | 11 comments Elizabeth wrote: "I chose this book because of a recommendation from my dad, who said I would enjoy the drama and the plot. Currently I am on page 20 and have just met Raskolnikov. I am intrigued by the stream of co..."

What do you mean by a stream of consciousness? How does Dostoyevsky describe Raskolnikov's consciousness through a third person point of view?


message 3: by Manasa (new)

Manasa Susarla | 8 comments Garima wrote: "I chose this book because of the somber cover and politically related title. They intrigued me as I wanted to know what the author might reveal about human nature/how society functions.

I am on pa..."


Based on what has been said about the novel, the novel seems really interesting. Why do you think the character might follow an impoverished man?


message 4: by Jessica (last edited Dec 07, 2015 09:49PM) (new)

Jessica Yu | 5 comments I chose this book because I heard it was a mystery about a murder. I have also heard that most of the book takes place within the protagonist's own mind which I find intriguing.
I just finished reading chapter 1. I have learned that the main character's name is Raskolnikov. He has just left his boardinghouse and walked to the apartment of Alyona Ivanovna. She runs a small pawnshop to which Raskolnikov takes detailed notes on as he sells her a watch.
So far Raskolnikov seems like a very interesting character. I think I will enjoy trying to figure him out.


message 5: by Elizabeth (new)

Elizabeth | 4 comments Daniel wrote: "Elizabeth wrote: "I chose this book because of a recommendation from my dad, who said I would enjoy the drama and the plot. Currently I am on page 20 and have just met Raskolnikov. I am intrigued b..."

Dostoyevsky, or whoever the narrator is, seems to be all-knowing and is able to describe what's going on in Raskolnikov's mind by putting his thoughts in quotations. The way Raskolnikov's thoughts are written make it seem as if he is having a conversation with himself, or maybe the reader, thus "stream of conciousness".


message 6: by Leilani (last edited Dec 10, 2015 09:11PM) (new)

Leilani (leilaniloo) | 7 comments Jessica wrote: "I chose this book because I heard it was a mystery about a murder. I have also heard that most of the book takes place within the protagonist's own mind which I find intriguing.
I just finished re..."


I thought it was interesting that, unlike the others who are reading your book, you included a few details about Raskolnikov's experience at the pawnshop in your summary. Does Raskolnikov literally take notes on the pawnshop? Why do you think he does this and what do you think the importance of his encounter with this woman is? I'm assuming the woman has some significance since her name full name is given.


message 7: by Jessica (new)

Jessica Yu | 5 comments Leilani wrote: "Jessica wrote: "I chose this book because I heard it was a mystery about a murder. I have also heard that most of the book takes place within the protagonist's own mind which I find intriguing.
I ..."

The third person narrator describes how Raskolnikov takes notes on the layout of the pawnshop in his head. He notices certain pathways he flags as possible escape routes or hiding places. Throughout the first chapter, Raskolnikov seems to be deeply troubled about a certain plan he wants to carry out. This plan is left very vague, but by the way Raskolnikov refers to it, I am guessing it involves something dark such as murder. Analyzing Raskolnikov's actions, I think that it is very possible that his decision to sell his watch to this woman was more of a cover up than anything else. It allowed him to scope out the layout of where I am assuming he will later commit a crime. I think the woman, Alyona Ivanovna, will act as the victim of Raskolnikov's plan.


message 8: by Jessica (new)

Jessica Yu | 5 comments Garima wrote: "I chose this book because of the somber cover and politically related title. They intrigued me as I wanted to know what the author might reveal about human nature/how society functions.

I am on pa..."


What do you think the significance of the speaker is? Why does Dostroevsky choose to have a third person narrator instead of just having the protagonist narrate?


message 9: by Jessica (new)

Jessica Yu | 5 comments Reading a few more pages, I have met a new character by the name of Marmeladov. Raskolnikov meets him at a tavern. Marmeladov is a heavy drinker and explains why with his sad life story. He tells Raskolnikov that he drinks "for I wish doubtly to suffer" (16). This shows how Marmeladov in a way feels guilty and wants to be punished for his past actions. This is interesting to me as usually people drink to forget things, not to punish themselves. I am curious about what role this Marmeladov character will play throughout the rest of the book.


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