Mrs. Schuet's AP Literature Class of '16 discussion

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A Raisin In the Sun by Lorraine Hansberry

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message 1: by Rick (new)

Rick Franc | 4 comments a. I chose this book because Essam recommended it to me as "it is very interesting" and "the characters are very nice" and "it's a great book".

b. I am currently on page 35.There book begins with 5 characters in an apartment in Chicago. Ruth is married to Walter and their son is Travis. The builds up anger over relatively non-important issues. The book is interesting so far and I am excited to learn how this family develops throughout the play as it seems that they have several issues both between the family and struggling to fit in society financially and the fact that they are black in a racist time.


message 2: by Essam (new)

Essam Rao | 2 comments I read this book for my last OR log, and I really enjoyed it. I especially liked some of the dialogue between the characters - it made the book really entertaining, almost like a TV show. This book also does a nice job of showcasing the struggles of both African-Americans and woman during the 1950's.


message 3: by Nick (new)

Nick Mak (kynmak) | 4 comments I know that this book relates to "Harlem" by Langston Hughes, so I am wondering if there has been any connection with a dream being deferred in the book yet. Are there any deeper meanings other than blatant racism and isolation? What kind of dreams does this family have and how are they deferred?


message 4: by Chau (new)

Chau Nguyen (jajajajajaja) | 8 comments I was thinking the same thing with Nick. There's some obvious themes within the book like racism, discrimination and other systematic problems in society. But do you think there is any significance to them building up "anger over relatively non-important issue"?


message 5: by Rick (new)

Rick Franc | 4 comments Exciting update to myself part 2: I have reached the end of the first scene of act one. Apparently the characters I mentioned earlier are fighting over what they should do with a $10,000 check from Big Walter(Walter's Dad) who passed away. This check seems to represent hope and opportunity of achieving the American Dream, especially for those who are struggling greatly. Using it correctly will let the family live well forever while a mistake may result in the loss of the only chance they ever had. Clearly this causes a lot of stress among the family and it will be interesting to see whether the stress will eventually lead to the doom of the family or if they will work hard and reach the American Dream.


message 6: by Katie (new)

Katie (ktwingrove) | 5 comments Nick wrote: "I know that this book relates to "Harlem" by Langston Hughes, so I am wondering if there has been any connection with a dream being deferred in the book yet. Are there any deeper meanings other tha..."
I read this book a few years ago and I remember a specific character in the play named Beneatha who had big dreams of being successful as a doctor. I definitely think that the poem can directly connect to her struggle with finding her identity and achieving her goals in her society. To connect it back to Othello, I do believe that she is a "divided self" because she struggles between achieving her dream and achieving others/society's expectations for her. I don't remember if her dream was deferred, but again, I know that the poem can apply to her situation.


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