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Off Topic > The heist of the century....a coincidence????

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message 1: by Ken B (new)

Ken B The heist of the century

http://www.cbsnews.com/news/the-heist...


So, is it just a coincidence that the reporter on a story entitled "The heist of the century" is named Moriarty?


message 2: by Mitra (new)

Mitra | 59 comments Amazing story! The significance of Moriarty in the story makes it that much more intriguing!
CBS Elementary's Sherlock has already found a priceless Van Gogh, maybe the writers of this show could find their way through this one too.


message 3: by Ken B (new)

Ken B I always feel like such a nerd when I post stuff like this. Glad someone else enjoyed the article and the silly, conspiracy theory motivation for posting.


message 4: by Mitra (new)

Mitra | 59 comments Conan Doyle had invented the name Moriarty to underline the artistic talent of his charcter', Moriarty ",as "mori" meaning "die" in Latin and "art", hence Moriarty. How a perfectly respectable reporter today on CBS would actually have that name, "die artfully" is quite extraordinary!


message 5: by Silvio111 (new)

Silvio111 | 123 comments Yes, but with that logic, it would make more sense if the reporter's name was Flambeau, G.K. Chesterton's art-loving master thief who is detected by Father Brown. In fact, the plot of that episode is so similar to the Isabella Gardiner Museum heist, if indeed, as the police detective surmised, the artwork is languishing in someone's private collection for their pleasure alone.

I remember when this heist happened, and I had been to the Gardiner some years previous to it. There is some stipulation in the rules of the bequest that nothing in the house can be changed, which I suppose is why they left empty spaces where the art used to be, even the one where the armchair is set up across from it.


message 6: by Ken B (new)

Ken B I'll bet the whole thing was a fraternal prank and the masterpieces are in the basement of some frat house thumb-tacked to the walls.


message 7: by Mitra (last edited Dec 07, 2015 02:35PM) (new)

Mitra | 59 comments Silvio111 wrote: "Yes, but with that logic, it would make more sense if the reporter's name was Flambeau, G.K. Chesterton's art-loving master thief who is detected by Father Brown. In fact, the plot of that episode ..."

But the extraordinary coincidence here is that this heiste is ACTUALLY being reported by a real person, not a fictitious one, whose real name is Moriarty. All the more intriguing, since the Moriarty of CBS's Elementary is an artist who restores paintings of, precisely this period AND has quite a few of them in her studio,namely a Brugle which Sherlock, "artfully" recognizes as a stolen one from a museum, at this point, Sherlock doesn't even realise that Moriarty is actually a woman. The other coincidence in this heiste of the century reported by a CBS reporter, is that the reporter's name being Moriarty, gives us a story within a story, as though we were completely in a Conan Doyle zone!
In another one of CBS's Elementary episodes, Sherlock manages to retrace a stolen Van Gogh, a Monet and many other art pieces in the home of a philanthropist, whose cuflinks Sherlock recognizes in a photo which will, subsequently, lead him to the stolen paintings. Just to say that it seems quite extraordinary that there should be a real CBS Moriarty reporting today the heiste of the century which only a genius such as Doyle's Moriarty and Elementary's Moriarty could have committed. An uttetly fascinating story worthy of a Sherlok Holmes case from the canon! Maybe the clever writers of Elementary could give the FBI some tips. Thanks you Ken for posting the link for this article. It has completely nourished my imagination!


message 8: by Mitra (new)

Mitra | 59 comments Ken wrote: "I'll bet the whole thing was a fraternal prank and the masterpieces are in the basement of some frat house thumb-tacked to the walls."

A perfect crime, all the same. The thieves/thief will not be prosecuted and will have a 5million dollar reward as well. One of these days, it will be announced that someone bought these paintings in a flee market and delivered them to the police. That someone may even be the CBS reporter, Ms. Moriarty


message 9: by Ken B (new)

Ken B Mitra wrote: "Ken wrote: "I'll bet the whole thing was a fraternal prank and the masterpieces are in the basement of some frat house thumb-tacked to the walls."

A perfect crime, all the same. The thieves/thief ..."


When found, they are going to have been glued to the back of a circa 1990 Vanilla Ice concert poster that someone is buying for the frame.


message 10: by Silvio111 (new)

Silvio111 | 123 comments Oh, I'm sorry, I missed the part about Elementary since I have never really watched it. ( I watched 10 minutes of the first episode and decided it was not my cup of tea.)

Well, I have to say, judging from, for instance, a show like Person of Interest, which seems to tear its plots from the news before it happens, there is probably a mole in this Moriarty reporter's news organization (perhaps M herself) who is feeding the info to the Elementary writers.

Although life being a crazy thing, Ken's frat boy prank seems more likely.


message 11: by Warren (new)

Warren Nast | 1 comments love elementary. I like when Sherlock shows up in unexpected places.


message 12: by Mitra (last edited Dec 08, 2015 06:38AM) (new)

Mitra | 59 comments Silvio111 wrote: "Oh, I'm sorry, I missed the part about Elementary since I have never really watched it. ( I watched 10 minutes of the first episode and decided it was not my cup of tea.)

Well, I have to say, judg..."


It is actually quite uncanny how many times there have been episodes in Elementary which have predicted the news by at least a few weeks. But in Elementary there are, above all, pieces of information which are not readily available for the general public.Such as mosquito spy drones that look and sound just like mosquitoes and can also poison and kill, the cloning of extinct species via their nearest relative, the subject of Dead Clade Walking which actually National Geographics took on too, or the injection of a drug that does Time Dialation which can reduce the experience of 10 years into a few days. Later,I found an article in a British newspaper that wrote about this drug and apparently, this may be used for prison sentences in future. Elementary has , actually, been very avant-garde about this kind of information which probably makes it closer to the spirit of Conan Doyle and the Victorian era, when there were all kinds of new discoveries. I find this show very interesting and inventive,I particularly like its ethics. More satisfying intellectually than Person of Interest,quite different from all other procedurals.
By the way, it was in the Elementary episode with the Van Gogh painting that Sherlock broke the glass of the poster frame and found the original Van Gogh behind the poster reproduction of the same painting.
Being an art historian myself, I really appreciate how often art works and artists come into plots in this show. Recently with a rare Picasso too. Elementary's Fascination with art maybe rooted in that its Moriarty is a painter and an art restorer. It's just so riveting all these coincidences, the name Moriarty, Elementary's plots and this Heiste‼️⁉️


message 13: by Silvio111 (new)

Silvio111 | 123 comments Mitra,

I am gratified to see you so happy.

Having said that, let me repeat...Mole.

I myself work as a transcriptionist for meetings of diverse organizations, many of them government (USDA, CDC, and others.) Often I will hear something that happened yesterday and then tomorrow or next week it will be reported in the news on NPR. I, of course, am sworn to secrecy. :)

But were I more enterprising, I could probably be a mole too.


message 14: by Mitra (new)

Mitra | 59 comments Then I suggest let's all of us put our heads together and invent a story that would surpass even Moriarty


message 15: by T.D. (new)

T.D. Mckinney (tdmckinney) | 8 comments Mitra wrote: "Conan Doyle had invented the name Moriarty to underline the artistic talent of his charcter', Moriarty ",as "mori" meaning "die" in Latin and "art", hence Moriarty. How a perfectly respectable repo..."

Moriarty is an Irish surname common in County Kerry. It's the Anglicized version of Ó Muircheartaigh. There are lots of people with the name. I've run into several over the years, including one named James. He, nor his parents, had ever read Doyle.


message 16: by Mitra (new)

Mitra | 59 comments T.D. wrote: "Mitra wrote: "Conan Doyle had invented the name Moriarty to underline the artistic talent of his charcter', Moriarty ",as "mori" meaning "die" in Latin and "art", hence Moriarty. How a perfectly re..."

Thank you for the information, very interesting. But it's true, all the same that Doyle gave Moriarty that name because of its meaning in Latin. I wonder if you might tell us what Muirecheartaigh means in Gaelic.


message 17: by T.D. (new)

T.D. Mckinney (tdmckinney) | 8 comments Sure - Muirecheartaigh means "Navigator" or "Seaworthy." Muir = Sea and Cheart = correct. It's also sometimes spelled Murtagh or Murtag because Gaelic translated to English...Yeah.


message 18: by Mitra (new)

Mitra | 59 comments Thank you so much! I always wondered if the name Muir was Scottish or Irish. I suppose, both countries would have it from Gaelic.
Thank you again.


message 19: by Mitra (new)

Mitra | 59 comments I, for one would feel, somewhat uneasy around a Moriarty! I would rather call them Muir! That's how much Conan Doyle's Moriarty has penetrated my imagination.


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