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Seasonal Author > Seasonal Authors 2016

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message 1: by Jenny (new)

Jenny (jeoblivion) | 4869 comments Here's our list for seasonal authors in 2016:

January - March: Fyodor Dostoyevsky
April - June: Sarah Waters
July - September: Haruki Murakami
October - December: H.G. Wells


message 2: by [deleted user] (new)

Thanks Jenny. I think this is a good selection with lots of interesting works to explore


message 3: by Chris (new)

Chris (cdavies1951) | 80 comments Looks good!


message 4: by Leslie (new)

Leslie | 15985 comments I may try to tackle The Idiot for Fyodor Dostoyevsky. He is an author I struggle with so I'm not sure about this...

For Sarah Waters, I am thinking about Fingersmith or maybe The Night Watch.

For Murakami, I'd like to read Norwegian Wood.

Either Tono Bungay or The History of Mr. Polly for Wells. I may revisit one of his more famous books via audiobook as well...


message 5: by Sam (new)

Sam (aramsamsam) | 71 comments I read Dostoyevsky's Gambler in November, so I'll pass that.
But I own Fingersmith, What I talk about when I talk about Running, and a short story collection, the latter two by Murakami.
I don't know what I might read by Wells yet.


message 6: by dely (new)

dely | 5214 comments Leslie wrote: "I may try to tackle The Idiot for Fyodor Dostoyevsky. He is an author I struggle with so I'm not sure about this...

For Sarah Waters, I am thinking about [book:Finger..."


It's my favorite by Dostoyevsky and my all time favorite book!

Though I liked Norwegian Wood, I think that the other books like Kafka on the Shore or 1Q84 are better. I like the magic realism of these books.


message 7: by Tracey (new)

Tracey (traceypb) | 1192 comments Norwegian wood was the one I liked least too, for me it wasn't how Murakami shines brightest..


message 8: by Leslie (new)

Leslie | 15985 comments dely wrote: "Leslie wrote: "I may try to tackle The Idiot for Fyodor Dostoyevsky. He is an author I struggle with so I'm not sure about this...

For Sarah Waters, I am thinking abo..."


Glad to hear such a positive statement about The Idiot!

I selected Norwegian Wood because it is on the Guardian's list. I have only read one other Murakami, The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle, which I was luke-warm about. It was very odd & I didn't feel like I ever really got what the point was.


message 9: by LauraT (new)

LauraT (laurata) | 13139 comments Mod
Leslie wrote: "I may try to tackle The Idiot for Fyodor Dostoyevsky. He is an author I struggle with so I'm not sure about this...

For Sarah Waters, I am thinking about [book:Finger..."


That's the most difficoult by Dosto. The Karamazov or Crime and punishment are more "easy" - if easy can be said of him.
I still have to consider my titles


message 10: by Chrissie (new)

Chrissie I have said it before and I will say it again. I love how Dostoyevsky writes. My favorites are The Idiot and Crime and Punishment.


message 11: by dely (new)

dely | 5214 comments LauraT wrote: "That's the most difficoult by Dosto. The Karamazov or Crime and punishment are more "easy" - if easy can be said of him.
I still have to consider my titles "


Interesting to see that for you it was the most difficult. Can I ask why? For me it was just flowing but I must admit that I totally could relate to Prince Myshkin.
For me the most difficult has been Demons because of all the philosophical part.


In my opinion The Brothers Karamazov is a summit of the previous three masterpieces: The Idiot, Crime&Punishment, Demons because the three brothers recall the main characters of the other books but Dostoyevsky has a deeper insight in their psychology. Dimitry Karamazov is like Raskolnikov of Crime&Punishment, Ivan reminds Stavrogin of Demons and Alesha recalls Prince Myshkin of The Idiot.

Just my two cents, I wouldn't read The Brothers Karamazov without have read something else by Dostyevsky. I will see if I can join reading some books by him I still haven't read as for example his first works, his shorter novels.


message 12: by Marina (new)

Marina (sonnenbarke) Chrissie wrote: "I have said it before and I will say it again. I love how Dostoyevsky writes. My favorites are The Idiot and Crime and Punishment."

I totally agree with you, Chrissie. I would just add White Nights to my favorites.


message 13: by dely (new)

dely | 5214 comments There is also another short story by him that I really love but I can never remind the English title! I hope Italian members can help me: in Italian it's La padrona.
I've found it in a collection of short stories so I don't think it has been published on its own because it's pretty short.
To people who have never read something by Dostoyevsky, I would also recommend a collection with his short stories.


message 14: by Marina (new)

Marina (sonnenbarke) You are right, dely, his short stories are really good. Unfortunately I never heard of the one you're talking about...


message 15: by LauraT (new)

LauraT (laurata) | 13139 comments Mod
dely wrote: "LauraT wrote: "That's the most difficoult by Dosto. The Karamazov or Crime and punishment are more "easy" - if easy can be said of him.
I still have to consider my titles "

Interesting to see that..."


Probably it was my first Dosto; I had a lot of difficoulties in tracing the chatacters, who kept changing their names!!!


message 16: by Chrissie (last edited Dec 09, 2015 02:03AM) (new)

Chrissie Marina wrote: "Chrissie wrote: "I have said it before and I will say it again. I love how Dostoyevsky writes. My favorites are The Idiot and Crime and Punishment."

I totally agree with y..."


Could you tell me what is so special about White Nights, other than it being written by D? I have added it to my wish list, from which I buy books, even though I prefer long over short, always. Please tell me more.


message 17: by Marina (new)

Marina (sonnenbarke) Chrissie, I read White Nights long ago, but what I remember is a feeling of an accomplished story, even though it was so short. I quite like short stories, but I too prefer novels. This one, however, is a magical story, with a lot of feeling and romanticism in it. I should actually re-read it, if I manage to find my book. I moved too many times and I never can find old books.


message 18: by Chrissie (new)

Chrissie Marina wrote: "Chrissie, I read White Nights long ago, but what I remember is a feeling of an accomplished story, even though it was so short. I quite like short stories, but I too prefer novels. This one, howeve..."

I can never find my books either. Often just the one I am looking for is in another country. Audiobooks are easy to find b/c they are in my computer in alphabetical order. I will try it, Marina. Thank you for explaining. It is good to know that you too prefer long over short. IF you are enjoying it you certainly don't want it to end quickly.


message 19: by [deleted user] (new)

I think I will attempt Crime and Punishment. I've never read any Dosto but I've wanted to for a while and that seems as good a place as any!

For Sarah Waters I will chose any of her books except The Paying Guests. I will see what takes me fancy or whatever other members are reading. I am feeling the same about Murakami

for HG Wells I will plan The War of the Worlds


message 20: by dely (new)

dely | 5214 comments Marina wrote: "You are right, dely, his short stories are really good. Unfortunately I never heard of the one you're talking about..."

I found it. It's The Landlady!


message 21: by dely (new)

dely | 5214 comments Chrissie wrote: "Could you tell me what is so special about White Nights, other than it being written by D? I have added it to my wish list, from which I buy books, even though I prefer long over short, always. Please tell me more. "

It's also sad and depressing but in my opinion it's so real! This is what I liked the most, how real the story is.


message 22: by Linda (new)

Linda Klinedinst (linda_klinedinst) | 69 comments Here are the books by the Authors that I will be reading for the Seasonal Authors 2016:

I hope that I am able to accomplish this goal for this next new year.

Crime and Punishment - January - March

The Night Watch - April - June

Norwegian Wood - July - September

The Island of Dr. Moreau - Oct - December


Happy Reading


message 23: by Chrissie (new)

Chrissie dely wrote: "Chrissie wrote: "Could you tell me what is so special about White Nights, other than it being written by D? I have added it to my wish list, from which I buy books, even though I prefer long over s..."

Sad and depressing is fine by me.... Yeah, D never simplifies his characters. That is what makes them so real.


message 24: by B the BookAddict (new)

B the BookAddict (bthebookaddict) | 8315 comments Can't wait for April when I'll get to re-read all Sarah Waters novels.


message 25: by dely (last edited Dec 09, 2015 12:27PM) (new)

dely | 5214 comments B the BookAddict wrote: "Can't wait for April when I'll get to re-read all Sarah Waters novels."

Is this the author you are liking so much in this period?

edit: no, it's Sara Donati. Sorry!


message 26: by B the BookAddict (new)

B the BookAddict (bthebookaddict) | 8315 comments @dely I do like two authors with Sarah/Sara as their Christian name; Water and Donati. I have previously read all Sarah Waters novel and am currently reading my way thru a Sara Donati series. :)


message 27: by Chrissie (new)

Chrissie I will read :

The Eternal Husband
White Nights
The Double

by Dostoyevsky.


message 28: by Marina (new)

Marina (sonnenbarke) Chrissie wrote: "I will read :

The Eternal Husband
White Nights
The Double

by Dostoyevsky."


I've read The Eternal Husband some days ago and it was really good, although not one of the best by Dostoyevsky.


message 29: by Chrissie (new)

Chrissie Marina, good to know that you prefer White Nights. I really have a hard time imagining that I will prefer any of these to Crime and Punishment or The Idiot.


message 31: by dely (new)

dely | 5214 comments Chrissie wrote: "Marina, good to know that you prefer White Nights. I really have a hard time imagining that I will prefer any of these to Crime and Punishment or The Idiot."

It's my same worry: can the minor works satisfy me as his masterpieces? Is it worth to read them now?

Perhaps I will pick up The Eternal Husband or Poor Folk or something else. I will also see what I can find in the secondhand bookshop.

Chrissie, have you already read Demons?


message 32: by Chrissie (last edited Dec 11, 2015 01:19AM) (new)

Chrissie dely, yes, but it was not one of my favorites. It also goes by the title Devils. I agree with your thinking/question. I tend to demand more of a writer that you know can write great stuff.

ETA, also the focus on religion and nihilism didn't work for me.


message 33: by dely (new)

dely | 5214 comments Chrissie wrote: "dely, yes, but it was not one of my favorites. It also goes by the title Devils. I agree with your thinking/question. I tend to demand more of a writer that you know can write great ..."

It was a very difficult book for me. Though I liked it, it isn't among my favorites either. But I will never ever forget the chapter with Stavrogin's confession to Tichon. It was so deep, realistic and I'm still able to imagine that little girl showing her fist to Stavrogin. It was so hard to stomach.


message 34: by Chrissie (new)

Chrissie dely, I didn't finish the book. D's characters are always realistic, always flawed but not someone you despise.


message 35: by dely (new)

dely | 5214 comments Chrissie wrote: "dely, I didn't finish the book. D's characters are always realistic, always flawed but not someone you despise."

What a pity! That chapter had been censored and now publishers add it always at the end of the book, not in its original position (don't know why).


message 36: by Chrissie (last edited Dec 11, 2015 06:03AM) (new)

Chrissie dely wrote: "Chrissie wrote: "dely, I didn't finish the book. D's characters are always realistic, always flawed but not someone you despise."

What a pity! That chapter had been censored and now publishers add..."


Wait a minute, I remember a discussion of where to put the chapter and that in my version it was put back in its original place. I think; not 100% sure though. I read a very large portion of the book.


message 37: by B the BookAddict (last edited Dec 11, 2015 03:35PM) (new)

B the BookAddict (bthebookaddict) | 8315 comments Re: Censored chapter (from Wiki)

"The editor of The Russian Messenger, Mikhail Katkov, refused to publish the chapter "At Tikhon's". Dostoyevsky considered the chapter to be essential to an understanding of the psychology of Stavrogin, and he tried desperately but unsuccessfully to save it through revisions and concessions to Katkov. He was eventually forced to drop it and rewrite parts of the novel that dealt with its subject matter. The chapter concerns Stavrogin's visit to the monk Tikhon at the local monastery, during which (view spoiler) Dostoyevsky himself never included the chapter in subsequent publications of the novel, but it is generally included in modern editions as an appendix. It has also been published separately, translated from Russian to English by S. S. Koteliansky and Virginia Woolf, with an essay on Dostoyevsky by Sigmund Freud."

cited from Joseph Frank (2010). Dostoevsky: A Writer in His Time. pp. 622–4.

Frank has written eight books on Dostoevsky.


message 38: by dely (new)

dely | 5214 comments Bette, add the spoiler tags for people who haven't read it yet! At least the part talking about the the girl.

And, yes, I agree thet that chapter is important to understand Stavrogin.


message 39: by B the BookAddict (last edited Dec 11, 2015 12:23PM) (new)

B the BookAddict (bthebookaddict) | 8315 comments @dely Thanks, is that better?


message 40: by dely (new)

dely | 5214 comments B the BookAddict wrote: "@dely Thanks, is that better?"

Yes, much better. Perhaps it would be also better to add in the spoiler also the part where he explains about his marriage. These are very important points in the story and knowing them already before starting the book is very bad.
In fact, having read this chapter at the end of the book, changed totally my thoughts about Stavrogin. It's an essential chapter of Demons.
Thanks :-)


message 41: by Pink (new)

Pink I have no idea where to start with Dostoevsky. Any suggestions? I'm thinking of Notes from Underground as it's fairly short and it's free on Amazon.


message 42: by B the BookAddict (new)

B the BookAddict (bthebookaddict) | 8315 comments I started with Crime and Punishment at school but haven't read anything else. I got a copy of The Brothers Karamazov fom the library last year but the print was too small for me to read:(


message 43: by Leslie (last edited Dec 11, 2015 05:23PM) (new)

Leslie | 20 comments I love these author picks!!! I will start with The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoyevsky The Brothers Karamazov as I tried to start it already for another group, but it's been a really busy few weeks.

And will just go from there.....


message 44: by Leslie (new)

Leslie | 15985 comments Welcome Leslie, from another Leslie :)

No rush to start with Dostoyevsky as these are plans for next year. Also, could you please include the title in your future posts as the covers can be hard to identify (especially on the app)? Thanks!


message 45: by Leslie (new)

Leslie | 20 comments No problem. I actually don't like it when people post just the cover because it's hard to see quickly. Anyway, no worries about Dostoevsky. I'm backed up right now. That was my point. :-)

I'm unfamiliar with the middle two authors. Any recommendations? But, like you said, there's no hurry.


message 46: by Marina (new)

Marina (sonnenbarke) Pink wrote: "I have no idea where to start with Dostoevsky. Any suggestions? I'm thinking of Notes from Underground as it's fairly short and it's free on Amazon."

Pink, I started with Crime and Punishment and The Idiot, I can't remember which of those came first. They are also his best novels, in my opinion (at least among the ones I've read so far). Notes from Underground is also a very good book.


message 47: by Chrissie (new)

Chrissie I agree with Marina. Just do not start with The Brothers Karamazov. It is heavier than the others; he sort of had to have his opinions stated loud and clear....his last chance. Just how I saw it.


message 48: by dely (new)

dely | 5214 comments Pink wrote: "I have no idea where to start with Dostoevsky. Any suggestions? I'm thinking of Notes from Underground as it's fairly short and it's free on Amazon."

It's short but not at all easy. It's an important book to understand many of his characters and his points of view.

I liked it (well, there is nothing I didn't like by Dostoyevsky!) and it could be a good book to start with though it's very intense, be prepared.


message 49: by B the BookAddict (last edited Dec 12, 2015 09:08AM) (new)

B the BookAddict (bthebookaddict) | 8315 comments Leslie wrote: "No problem. I actually don't like it when people post just the cover because it's hard to see quickly. Anyway, no worries about Dostoevsky. I'm backed up right now. That was my point. :-)

I'm unfa..."


Welcome, Leslie. Nice to see you over here:)

I'd recommend Sarah Waters' The Paying Guests. Here's my review in which I do not give too much of the plot away: https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/2...

or Fingersmith, no review, I'm sorry.


message 50: by Leslie (new)

Leslie | 20 comments Thank you BookAddict. :-) I marked both of those and The Night Watch.


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