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A Christmas Carol
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DEC 15: a christmas carol > A Christmas Carol discussion SPOILERS!

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Salli Thompson (sallift) | 72 comments Mod
Have a mug of egg nog and settle into a cozy chair by the fire. Let's read this classic Christmas ghost story! I feel like we can discuss all the chapters here because it's not like anyone hasn't either heard, read or seen the ending. Merry Christmas and happy reading!!!


Tracey Lundell | 24 comments I had seen the movie many times but never read the book. I'm glad we chose this book because it made me add it to my book collection. It's one of those I never go to the bookstore for because I already know the story. Now I am quite please I bought it and have it as part of my collection. Easy read for a hectic month! Thank you.


message 3: by Sandra (new)

Sandra | 9 comments I finally picked up my copy of the book from the library and I have never read it. I think I got the child's version since it is fully illustrated.

Can't wait to start reading it. Since we are reading in this, I am also curious what is your favourite movie adaptation? Mine is the Muppets Christmas Carol.


Tracey Lundell | 24 comments Yes, I actually had Gonzo's voice in my head! love the Muppet version.


message 5: by Jeniffer (new) - added it

Jeniffer Katona | 4 comments Oh the Disney one, Scoorge McDuck.


message 6: by Nicole (new)

Nicole Spada-allgood | 12 comments I watch Muppet Christmas Carol every year - I think it's probably my favorite adaptation. However, I also love the 1951 film adaptation.


message 7: by Jennifer (new)

Jennifer Vandenberg | 3 comments Jeniffer wrote: "Oh the Disney one, Scoorge McDuck."

This is my favorite one too. I like Goofy as Marley.


Karina I read this book last Christmas or earlier this year, I can't remember but I enjoyed it more than I thought I would. I have read quite a bit of Dickens, some of his I enjoy more than others but thankfully it was a better read than Nicholas Nickleby (which wasn't bad, but just soooooooooo long). I have always seen the films, my favorites being the Disney version and the Muppets (obviously) so I definitely used their voices in my head and visualized Michael Caine in every scene because I love Michael Caine!


message 9: by Tiffany (new)

Tiffany (tiffsquatch) When do we need to be finished?


Hannah | 21 comments I just saw this play at our community theater and am so excited that it's our book! Looking forward to discussing it.


Hannah | 21 comments I'm reading the kindle version on an iPhone, and scattered throughout are little philosophical tidbits. It seems like most or maybe all of them are related to the text- in the printed version are they like a sidebar or illustrations or something? Anyway some of them really speak to me. The would make good notes to leave for myself, or meditation points, or something.


message 12: by Salli (new) - added it

Salli Thompson (sallift) | 72 comments Mod
My favorite film adaptation is called 'Scrooge' starring Albert Finney. It's a musical and I love the music written for it. I love singing "I Hate People" when I'm in traffic.
You know who would make an epic Ebenezer? The actor who plays Filtch. We could have a Harry Potter mash up with Filtch as Scrooge, Nearly-Headless Nick as the ghost of Christmas Past, Hagrid as the Ghost of Christmas Present and a Dementor as the Ghost of Christmas Future. Dumbledore as Jacob Marley?


Hannah | 21 comments Awesome! I can see it :)


Hannah | 21 comments Awesome! I can see it :)


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Salli Thompson (sallift) | 72 comments Mod
Snape would be hilarious as the ghost of Christmas future.


Hannah | 21 comments So I see in the introduction that the little tidbits have been added by the editors? "Sprinkled with timeless wisdom." The fact that they apparently aren't part of the original makes me feel less warm about them and actually kind of annoyed that they interrupt the text.


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Beth Dougherty | 1 comments Hello all! I am reading the free version from project gutenberg, so no commentary or illustrations. however, there is a sound cloud recording the New York Public Library uploaded of Neil Gaiman reading the entirety of it, using Dickens' own annotations for his public performance. And it's free! I have been reading it aloud to my four month old, but found that listening to it after I read is a really cool option.


Hannah | 21 comments Nice! I love that you're reading it to your baby.

Instead of the usual imagery I get while reading, I totally read this with the image of Dickens reading it to an audience (pulled directly from the Doctor Who Unquiet Dead episode). I look forward to listening to that soundcloud recording.


Devin Waddell Babcock | 115 comments Mod
Hi everyone! The book that I picked up from the library looks like a children's picture book- I just wanted to verify that this is the right story?


message 20: by Nicole (new)

Nicole Spada-allgood | 12 comments Salli, I think my class watched that version when I was in 5th grade - I remember laughing so hard at that song. I need to rewatch it!


message 21: by Salli (new) - added it

Salli Thompson (sallift) | 72 comments Mod
Devin, it's a novel, a short one, but a novel. The first line is "Marley was dead, to begin with."
I am finally actually read the first section. I am pleasantly surprised at how witty and light (even humorous) Dickens' writing style is. I love the line about his house having played hide-and-seek with the other houses when it was young and forgotten it's way out. That was so lovely. I am enjoying it even more than expected!


Hannah | 21 comments Same here Salli. The humor took me by surprise because the way the story made it into general consciousness is always the spirits, and especially the grim aspects of them. Also the extreme joy Scrooge experienced watching his younger self's Christmas's.


message 23: by Salli (new) - added it

Salli Thompson (sallift) | 72 comments Mod
Okay, I managed to read the First Spirit chapter tonight. I'm really motivated to finish so I can start my Christmas present books :D
The description of the spirit was so strange and abstract. I didn't care for it and I'm glad no one has tried to depict that (even possible??) in a movie. So strange.


Melinda | 21 comments I finished it, and I am glad that I read it, but this is no where near my favorite. I am very glad that we do not still speak like the way Dickens writes. It did not flow well for me. I am curious to know if there is the same style in his other books. Can any of you comment to that?
As for the story, I have always enjoyed the adaptations on tv. However I always thought that there was something missing that maybe was in the book. Now that I have read it, it turns out that it's just missing. I don't think that in any other book I have more wanted a bigger backstory. How long was Ebenezer and his girl together before she left? I want the story of how he became so miserable and grumpy. He was happy at Fezziwigs... What happened?


message 25: by Nicole (new)

Nicole Spada-allgood | 12 comments Salli, I actually thought that Muppet Christmas Carol did a pretty good job at depicting it. Ancient, yet young, petite, with a shining light to it.

Melinda, Dickens writes in a "stream of consciousness" style, but this novel has less of that and more direct writing. It was written with recitation in mind, and, indeed was often read to audiences by Dickens himself. I'm actually not the greatest fan of Dickens, in general, but I do love A Christmas Carol.

I do see what you mean about it missing something - Scrooge seems to come around a bit too quickly. This is in part because it was never really Scrooge's story that Dickens wished to emphasize. He wrote the book specifically to show the plight of the impoverished and poor. Scrooge was simply a symbol for the elite and privileged of society, and a lesson for what will happen if those able to do not help those that are less fortunate.


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Salli Thompson (sallift) | 72 comments Mod
Nicole, I thought the Muppet's version did the closest depiction too. But there was the "one minute it has one leg and the next it had 4" that was abstract to me. I'm excited to finish.


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Salli Thompson (sallift) | 72 comments Mod
20 more pages to go! I was super confused in the part where the poorer people were carrying their dinners somewhere. I feel like I need Dr. Who to take me there and show me what's going on.


Amanda Fragale Just finished. Last time I read the book was in middle school English Lit. I am not a huge fan of Dickens but I've always enjoyed this story and the Muppet version as well. There were quite a few passages I don't remember from my original reading. Dickens descriptions of the joy and happiness of Christmas amongst the different groups past and present resonated more with me this time around. Perhaps because I'm older and have my own family now Mrs. Cratchit's preparations for their meager dinner and worries about too much flour in the pudding cracked me up. Times change and society grows, but mom will always worry if her celebration dinner is up to snuff, right? Haha onto Bradbury!


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Salli Thompson (sallift) | 72 comments Mod
Finished last night! I liked it but didn't love it. I'm glad it was a short one. I did feel inspired by it though. It's funny how as I read it I always heard Scrooge's voice as Albert Finney's.


Melinda | 21 comments Nicole's comment that the purpose of the story was to highlight poverty and not the character of Scrooge really struck a note with me. I definitely read for characters. It is why I only read one book at a time. But looking at the story from this perspective makes me much less annoyed with missing more of Scrooge's story. Thanks for the insight Nicole!


Melinda | 21 comments Nicole's comment that the purpose of the story was to highlight poverty and not the character of Scrooge really struck a note with me. I definitely read for characters. It is why I only read one book at a time. But looking at the story from this perspective makes me much less annoyed with missing more of Scrooge's story. Thanks for the insight Nicole!


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