You'll love this one...!! A book club & more discussion

35 views
Challenges: Year Long Main 2021 > Dawn's Hunt for History

Comments Showing 1-24 of 24 (24 new)    post a comment »
dateDown arrow    newest »

message 1: by Dawn (last edited Dec 11, 2015 09:42AM) (new)

Dawn (caveatlector) | 1681 comments The Plan


NORTH AMERICA:
Canada:
d. Red Bay Basque Whaling Station
- read a book set in Maritime Canada (Newfoundland, Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island, New Brunswick) The Colony of Unrequited Dreams
- read a book where fishing or whaling is a large part of the story Moby-Dick; or, The Whale
- Take home item – Fiddle: Read a book that has a musical instrument in it. The Piano Man's Daughter

SOUTH AMERICA:
Peru:
a. Historic Sanctuary of Machu Picchu
- Read a book set in Peru Red April
- Read a book set in a mountainous area. Two-Gun & Sun
- Take Home Item – Ceremonial Knife: Read a book with a knife on the cover. The Hidden City

EUROPE:
Italy:
a. Venice and its Lagoon
- Read a book set in Italy The English Patient
- Read a book set in Venice The Venice Experiment: A Year of Trial and Error Living Abroad or Death at La Fenice
- Take Home Item – Gondolier’s Scarf: Read a book with a predominantly red cover (70%)

AFRICA:
Kenya:
a. Kenya Lake System in the Great Rift Valley
- Read a book set in Kenya The In-Between World of Vikram Lall
- Read a book set near a lake Late Nights on Air
- Take Home Item – Flamingo Feather: Read a book with the word flamingo in the title, a flamingo on the cover, or the cover is predominantly hot pink (70%). The Sirens of Titan

ASIA:
China:
b. The Great Wall
- Read a book set in China The Middle Kingdom
- Read a book in which there is an army
- Take Home Item – Brick: Because the Great Wall is colossal and made of bricks, read a chunkster that is more than 500 pages Swann's Way

Japan:
a. Hiroshima Peace Memorial (Genbaku Dome)
- Read a book set in Japan Across the Nightingale Floor
- Read a book set in wartime (any war)
- Take Home Item – Dove: Read a book in which a dove is on the cover, or in the title/subtitle When the Doves Disappeared

Thailand:
a. Ban Chiang Archaeological Site
- Read a book set in Thailand The Windup Girl
- Read a book in which a King is a significant character
- Take Home Item – Pottery Shard: Read a book with a bowl or cup on the cover. Wine of Violence

AUSTRALIA/SOUTH SEA ISLANDS:
New Zealand:
a. Te Wahipounamu – South West New Zealand
- Read a book set in New Zealand The Luminaries
- Read a book in the fantasy genre (sorry, can’t help but think of the Lord of the Rings movies)
- Take Home Item – Chunk of Glacier Ice: Read a book where there is snow/ice on the cover, or “snow” or “ice” is in the title. Ghost of the White Nights

Philippines:
a. Rice Terraces of the Philippine Cordilleras
- Read a book set in the Philippines Dusk
- Read a book in which agriculture is a significant theme
- Take Home Item – Grain of Rice: Read a book with the word “Rice” in the title, or the author’s name. The Warlord of Mars


message 2: by Dawn (last edited Sep 13, 2016 12:02PM) (new)

Dawn (caveatlector) | 1681 comments The First Twelve
ASIA:
Thailand:
✓ a. Ban Chiang Archaeological Site
The Windup Girl- Read a book set in Thailand
Richard II - Read a book in which a King is a significant character
Death in Ecstasy by Ngaio Marsh - Take Home Item – Pottery Shard: Read a book with a bowl or cup on the cover.

China:
✓ b. The Great Wall
The Three-Body Problem- Read a book set in China
The Sentimentalists- Read a book in which there is an army
East Lynne- Take Home Item – Brick: Because the Great Wall is colossal and made of bricks, read a chunkster that is more than 500 pages

AFRICA
South Africa:
✓ a. Vredefort Dome
The Story of an African Farm- Read a book set in South Africa
World of Trouble- Read a book in the post-apocalyptic genre
The Moon is a Harsh Mistress- Take Home Item - Piece of Meteorite: Read a book set in space

EUROPE:
Italy:
✓ a. Venice and its Lagoon
The Venus Throw- Read a book set in Italy
The Venice Experiment: A Year of Trial and Error Living Abroad- Read a book set in Venice
The King of Shanghai (Ava Lee, #7) by Ian Hamilton - Take Home Item – Gondolier’s Scarf: Read a book with a predominantly red cover (70%)


message 3: by Dawn (last edited Dec 21, 2016 04:54PM) (new)

Dawn (caveatlector) | 1681 comments The Second Twelve
NORTH AMERICA:
Canada:
✓ c. Historic District of Old Québec
Last Night in Montreal - read a book set in Quebec
Sweetness in the Belly - read about immigrants coming to the new world (could be historical fiction or nonfiction)
Of Human Bondage - Take home item - French Food: Read a book that has French food it in (bring home a taste of old France).


message 4: by Cherie (new)

Cherie (crobins0) | 19984 comments Funny, when you look at all of the tasks, it seems like too much, but when you break it down by numbers it feels so different. It hit me when I saw your last two messages.

I CAN stay in Australia and do all of the tasks. That is only 24 books. 1/8th of what I read this year already.


message 5: by Dawn (new)

Dawn (caveatlector) | 1681 comments It's true, it's not that many when it comes down to it. I'm going to attempt to do every continent with books that are already on the TBR.


message 6: by Cherie (new)

Cherie (crobins0) | 19984 comments It is all I can do not to add books to my TBR!

I was at my daughter's tonight and we were trading book titles back and forth and talking about the tasks. She had four books with rice the titles (from some food related challenge) and all I had was The Complete Vampire Chronicles by Anne Rice because I bought at a library sale. She started laughing at me because I never read them. Never was interested in vampires and zombies and all those types.


message 7: by Sarah, Moderator (new)

Sarah | 18188 comments I loved The Windup Girl - the perfect book for Thailand!


message 8: by Dawn (new)

Dawn (caveatlector) | 1681 comments I was pretty happy when I realized that I could use it for Thailand, I've been meaning to read it for 3 years now.


message 9: by Sarah, Moderator (new)

Sarah | 18188 comments I hope you enjoy it.


message 10: by Cherie (new)

Cherie (crobins0) | 19984 comments Does Aboriginal people = Indigenous people?


message 11: by Rusalka, Moderator (new)

Rusalka (rusalkii) | 17065 comments Technically, yes. In Australia we just never thought of another name for Aborigines than what they were, aboriginal to the land. So I can see what Dawn's thinking.

But I think you're right Cherie, that Janice is more thinking of the Indigenous peoples of Australia with that task, than any Indigenous populations. Happy to stand corrected though.


message 12: by Janice, Moderator (new)

Janice (jamasc) | 48750 comments Yes, I was thinking of the indigenous peoples of Australia for that task. Sorry for not being politically correct. But when I have ever been political?


message 13: by Dawn (new)

Dawn (caveatlector) | 1681 comments Hmmm, I did not even think of Australia when it said Aboriginal....back to the drawing board then.


message 14: by Janice, Moderator (new)

Janice (jamasc) | 48750 comments Sorry Dawn. To my way of understanding, "Aboriginal" means Australian indigenous peoples which is why I used that term.


message 15: by Dawn (new)

Dawn (caveatlector) | 1681 comments No worries. I'll just have to find something else.


message 16: by Rusalka, Moderator (new)

Rusalka (rusalkii) | 17065 comments Language and culture are a minefield! I was looking at the Canada tasks and thought they were about Australian Aborigines initially.


message 17: by Dawn (new)

Dawn (caveatlector) | 1681 comments It's just natural to think of what you know I guess. :)

That and I have some Canadian Lit books I want to read and it seemed a perfect task for it. *sigh*


message 18: by Cherie (new)

Cherie (crobins0) | 19984 comments Sorry, Dawn, I wasn't trying to get your book shot down. I actually like the sound of it. Maybe it can go somewhere else. Do the Canadians call the Indiginous population Indians, like we do in the US? I don't know much about their history in Canada.


message 19: by Janice, Moderator (new)

Janice (jamasc) | 48750 comments Cherie wrote: "Sorry, Dawn, I wasn't trying to get your book shot down. I actually like the sound of it. Maybe it can go somewhere else. Do the Canadians call the Indiginous population Indians, like we do in the ..."

The politically correct term now is First Nations Peoples.


message 20: by Dawn (new)

Dawn (caveatlector) | 1681 comments The term I hear most is Native. I'm pretty sure it got shortened from Native Indian which was used to differentiate from East Indian (which is also a passe term, it's now South Asian or Indo-Canadian). Indian by itself is definitely out of use, it's considered very politically incorrect.

Though Aboriginal is a term that is used, it and Indigenous tend to refer to First Nations, Inuit and the Metis as a whole rather than one or the other.


message 21: by Janice, Moderator (new)

Janice (jamasc) | 48750 comments Dawn wrote: "Though Aboriginal is a term that is used, it and Indigenous tend to refer to First Nations, Inuit and the Metis as a whole rather than one or the other. "

I was going to say that I'd never heard "aboriginal" used in reference to our indigenous peoples and then remembered that APTN (television network) stands for Aboriginal Peoples Television Network. And then I googled the Friendship Centre (a local organization) to see how they describe their services, and it reads "aboriginal peoples". I must have my head in the sand.


message 22: by Dawn (new)

Dawn (caveatlector) | 1681 comments I might hear it more often because I work in government, so it's a term that gets used in official documents. Not always but sometimes.
We work with the three bands closest to us whenever there is a development, and one of them just moved their office into town so I worked with them for that renovation.

I don't think it's that common a phrase in normal usage.


message 23: by Cherie (new)

Cherie (crobins0) | 19984 comments I think we are still using American Indian for our official title. What started me thinking about the whole thing was because I was trying to search for books for the Grand Canyon Task. I completely overlooked that Janice wrote "First Nation". I picked up on "where arrows were used". I wanted to find books about Indians. I have a book with an arrow head on the cover, but I was thinking about a book that I have had forever called House of Rain: Tracking a Vanished Civilization Across the American Southwest. I guess I will have to read it and see if they used arrows. I know that the Plains Indians all used bows and arrows, but I do not know if the tribes along the Columbia River and those in Canada did.


message 24: by Dawn (new)

Dawn (caveatlector) | 1681 comments I rather assumed everyone used bows and arrows, definitely do around here anyway, as that's part of what they're always looking for in the archaeology excavations.

Death at Rainy Mountain or The Blessing Way might work too. I'm not positive about any arrows though, it's been awhile since I read them both.


back to top