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The Leavenworth Case
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The Leavenworth Case > The Leavenworth Case, Week 2, Book II - Henry Clevering

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message 1: by ☯Emily , The First (new) - rated it 4 stars

☯Emily  Ginder | 1164 comments Mod
Here we discuss Book 2 which has 13 chapters.


message 2: by ☯Emily , The First (new) - rated it 4 stars

☯Emily  Ginder | 1164 comments Mod
I didn't think the first book had too much Victorian superfluity of words. Then I started reading the first page of the second book and I am hit with this sentence: "Not that without some such light as had fallen upon the affair through Eleanore's own behavior, I should have selected this man as one in any way open to suspicion; the peculiarity of his manner at the inquest not being marked enough to counteract the improbability of one in his relations to the deceased finding sufficient motive for a crime so manifestly without favorable results to himself."

If anyone knows that this means, please explain!


message 3: by ☯Emily , The First (new) - rated it 4 stars

☯Emily  Ginder | 1164 comments Mod
I do like Green's conversations which make the actions flow. The narrator is wordy only when he talks and when he writes his thoughts. But he is a lawyer. My lawyer never shuts up and has long-winded sentences. So maybe this is a realistic portrayal. Anna Green's father was an attorney and she knew many in the legal profession.


message 4: by ☯Emily , The First (new) - rated it 4 stars

☯Emily  Ginder | 1164 comments Mod
Chapter 5 has the narrator looking at Harwell and was remarking upon the empliability of his figure. I do not know what empliability means and it is not in any dictionary I possess. Does anyone know what that word means?


message 5: by Kim (new) - rated it 4 stars

Kim (crossreactivity) ☯Emily wrote: "I didn't think the first book had too much Victorian superfluity of words. Then I started reading the first page of the second book and I am hit with this sentence: "Not that without some such ligh..."

Lol! Boiled down I think Raymond is saying he would not normally consider Harwell suspicious, except for the possible connection to Eleanore. At least that's what I got after reading it over at least 10 times!


message 6: by ☯Emily , The First (new) - rated it 4 stars

☯Emily  Ginder | 1164 comments Mod
Does anyone believe the story of Harwell's dream in Chapter 7? I think he is relating this horrible dream to get Everett Raymond off his back and perhaps lead him astray. What do you think?


message 7: by Kim (last edited Dec 09, 2015 07:05PM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Kim (crossreactivity) I didn't believe it when I read that either. I was sure he had made it up for a reason... (view spoiler)


message 8: by ☯Emily , The First (new) - rated it 4 stars

☯Emily  Ginder | 1164 comments Mod
After completing Book 2, I still think the murderer is (view spoiler)


Sara (phantomswife) Does anyone else think Gryce is a Victorian Columbo? I love the way he pretends to know nothing and depend upon Raymond. When he sends Raymond to seek out Hannah at the end of this section, I had to chuckle that he tells him Q would not be up to the job.

I am leaning toward Harwell at this point because I am sure it is neither Mary nor Clavering. Too much suspicion thrown in their direction.

Emily -- I think "empliable"is inflexible and simply means Harwell has a very stiff bearing.


message 10: by Kim (new) - rated it 4 stars

Kim (crossreactivity) He definitely plays dumb. He's also a lot like Poirot with Hastings in that he doesn't always share his thoughts or the purpose behind his inquiries. The only time he acknowledged that Raymond had any particular talent was when he sent him into the "gentleman's" club to meet Clavering. And even then he knew things about the man that he didn't share with Raymond.


message 11: by Anastasia Kinderman, The Only (new) - rated it 5 stars

Anastasia Kinderman | 654 comments Mod
☯Emily wrote: "Chapter 5 has the narrator looking at Harwell and was remarking upon the empliability of his figure. I do not know what empliability means and it is not in any dictionary I possess. Does anyone kno..."

Well "pliability" means one can be moved, either from their physical position or induced to give information. Harwell is definitely not pliable so I would assume that Sara is correct and it's saying he's not pliable. Not sure if that means his bearing or his refusal to answer questions.

I believed Harwell's dream. I may have seen too many ghost movies though, lol.


message 12: by Ginny (new)

Ginny (burmisgal) | 190 comments I too am leaning towards Harwell at this point. I was unable to track down the reference to "empliability". My kindle turns up nothing in a search--was this Ch. 5 in part I? But looking back at ch. 5 in part I, I was reminded of Harwell's testimony that he taught Eleanore how to use the pistol. And then we have the dream pointing the finger at Clavering. Harwell is a very strange man--staying the course with his work, wanting no supervision, implicating first one person, then another. Certainly he had the most opportunity--have we learned yet of any motive?


message 13: by ☯Emily , The First (new) - rated it 4 stars

☯Emily  Ginder | 1164 comments Mod
Harwell became suspicious when he told his bizarre dream. Parts sounded as if he had been present, which would make him a suspect. However, I haven't yet found a motive.


message 14: by Sara (last edited Dec 10, 2015 03:01PM) (new) - rated it 3 stars

Sara (phantomswife) I suspect Harwell of being in love with Mary (why not, everyone else is). The dream is indeed very suspect.


message 15: by Ginny (new)

Ginny (burmisgal) | 190 comments Just for interest--there was a movie made in 1936 and it looks like it is available on youtube. I haven't tried it yet, as I want to finish the book first.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bZcRn...


message 16: by Ginny (new)

Ginny (burmisgal) | 190 comments I'm not complaining, just pointing out that the name is Henry Clavering, also the name of a main character in the Trollope book The Claverings, published in 1867, 9 years before this book. And since Henry Clavering is English, maybe Green just used it as an obviously English name, or maybe she was suggesting he was connected to Trollope's fictional family?


message 17: by ☯Emily , The First (new) - rated it 4 stars

☯Emily  Ginder | 1164 comments Mod
Ginny wrote: "I'm not complaining, just pointing out that the name is Henry Clavering, also the name of a main character in the Trollope book The Claverings, published in 1867, 9 years before this ..."

Very interesting!


message 18: by Anastasia Kinderman, The Only (new) - rated it 5 stars

Anastasia Kinderman | 654 comments Mod
Ginny wrote: "Just for interest--there was a movie made in 1936 and it looks like it is available on youtube. I haven't tried it yet, as I want to finish the book first.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bZcRn..."

Ooooh a movie!


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