Never Let Me Go Never Let Me Go discussion


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Kara Kelley For anyone who has read, or is currently reading this book - how do you feel about it? I was eager to get my hands on it after I read rave reviews... but alas, I am having such a HARD time getting into it. I find it redundant, boring, and slow paced. But I am pushing myself to finish it...


Izzy I didn't get it either. On the edition that I picked up, the blurb misled me as it suggested it was a fast pace science-fiction tragedy.
That may be the case but before you reach that point, you have to sit through roughly 200 pages of the main character talking about nothing of significance. The actual story takes place in part 3.


Karishma I found it slow too, but I thought that was a storytelling device of some sort. I felt that the slowness felt almost unreal and dreamlike, bereft of emotion to some extent.

I was glad to have powered through this though. The pace finally made sense to me when the reveal turned up.

Just my two cents.


Bulbul It is a slow book and it takes time to figure out the "science" part of it. But I liked the book and it made me cry.


Kara Kelley Izzy wrote: "I didn't get it either. On the edition that I picked up, the blurb misled me as it suggested it was a fast pace science-fiction tragedy.
That may be the case but before you reach that point, you h..."


I agree. The majority of the story was filled with useless, trivial blurbs. Curious how it received so many four star reviews?


Kara Kelley Well it has received great reviews so obviously it has a lot of appeal to a lot of readers! I just didn't connect with the voice/style or pacing.


message 7: by Ema (last edited Dec 04, 2015 05:35PM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Ema Karishma wrote: "I found it slow too, but I thought that was a storytelling device of some sort. I felt that the slowness felt almost unreal and dreamlike, bereft of emotion to some extent.

I was glad to have pow..."


I agree, I thought it worked. I didn't get any impression that the book was some flashy sci-fi action sideshow at all, though. The cover of the one I saw seemed very tranquil, and the blurb was very similar to the writing style of the book, if not an excerpt entirely. I had no idea it was sci-fi at all until somewhere in the middle, but I love how unique and unassuming the feel was, so that the twist had even more of an impact than normal. Beautiful piece of writing. I, in fact, did give it four stars.


Marcia I tried this book but just couldn't finish it. I found the same as you Kara. It was boring and very slow paced. And it kept talking about the great time at Halesham. These people are so passive.

I wasn't expecting anything flashy but a bit more interesting would have been good.


Sheila Karishma wrote: "I found it slow too, but I thought that was a storytelling device of some sort. I felt that the slowness felt almost unreal and dreamlike, bereft of emotion to some extent.

I was glad to have pow..."


I think it WAS a storytelling device. It was unreal and dreamlike because the story is narrated through characters who'd been taught all their lives that they were less than human, that they weren't "real", so they think and react accordingly.

I don't know if this should have been marketed as sci-fi at all. Maybe psychological or something (too subtle to be horror, I suppose).


William Watkins I can understand why you would feel disappointed about the story if you were misled into thinking it was a fast-paced sci-fi book.
Never Let Me Go is one of my favourite books, but I also kind of knew what I was getting into when I read it as I had read some other books by Ishiguro, and although his works seem to vary greatly in story and style he tends to look at the world in a certain way and that is always shown in his works. I love the subtleness and how the story evolves slowly. I feel that we needed to know all about the characters so that in the end we can make our decisions (SPOILER- as to whether or not they had a soul).
I think the idea he was trying to get across isn't able to be made into something flashy and fast-paced, but it needs time to cover all the areas. I can see where you are coming from, but I can't agree when you say it was boring. But I guess I am just interested in and captivated by something you're not.


message 11: by Linda (new) - rated it 1 star

Linda Kara wrote: "For anyone who has read, or is currently reading this book - how do you feel about it? I was eager to get my hands on it after I read rave reviews... but alas, I am having such a HARD time getting ..."

I gave up on it. Just wasn't my type of book. Another lesson in doing your own thing instead of buying into all the hype.


message 12: by Kara (new) - rated it 2 stars

Kara Kelley Marcia wrote: "I tried this book but just couldn't finish it. I found the same as you Kara. It was boring and very slow paced. And it kept talking about the great time at Halesham. These people are so passive.

..."


My thoughts, too :(


Glenn Goettel The first ~100 pages or so indeed are short of plot, but very atmospheric and unsettling. Til the shocking revelation in the gazebo, there is clearly something very odd about this place but unless you know what's coming, you cannot say just what. The novel's flaws are few enough, the surreal tone subsumes them. IMO, great book, well worth wading through the slow beginning.


Lizze Delgado We covered this book in one of my lit classes because my, frankly, brilliant professor was gaga over it. It is literary sci-fi. The WHOLE significance of the story occurs to the reader in their mind rather than on the page. On its face there's really nothing much there in terms of plot, but that is because the author was going for a hyper-realistic point of view and tone. He wants the reader to be fully immersed in the POV character, so that you can understand the true implications of her circumstances only by examining her simple inner life and her natural reactions to her story. He doesn't tell you the story, he forces you to find it out for yourself. The devil is seriously in the details with this one and I honestly didn't enjoy it either. It's like a quiet, dreary philosophical argument. In many ways though, I've got to admit that it is exceptionally well written.


Giulia I guess it is the kind of book you really get just at the end. I understand it might sound slow paced but I think it's really worth the effort. The slowness is a sortytelling device, I mean, there's no much happening in fact. And that's the entire point of the book, you hold on to the moments in your life (alias details in the book). By me, since I got to finish it, it holds a place in my heart.


message 16: by CC (new) - rated it 5 stars

CC I loved the story and I really enjoyed how the story was told...The pace, the writing....
One of my favourite books, but in the end... it's just a matter of taste...


message 17: by Anne (new) - rated it 5 stars

Anne I also loved it, one of my favourites because it leaves you with shivers. Ishiguro is always unexpected.


message 18: by Kim (new) - rated it 2 stars

Kim One of my abandoned reads. I have often wondered how people stay awake while reading something so boring.


Dylan I think the mistake people make with this book is assuming it is a sci fi book. It really isn't. The science is sketchy at best. I think it is more an avatar or reflection on life in general. I found it increasingly sad and affecting as the the book progressed, but I am glad I read it, as I am with most Ishiguro books, even the impenetrable The Unconsoled.


message 20: by [deleted user] (new)

I can imagine that anyone reading this on the basis that it's a fast-paced sci-fi book, would be disappointed. I thought this was a great book - but while it has some sci-fi elements, it certainly isn't primarily a sci-fi book, and by no stretch of the imagination is it fast-paced!


message 21: by Jen (new) - rated it 5 stars

Jen St This is one of the few books, in my entire life, where I skipped ahead to find out the answer. I literally could not read fast enough to satisfy my curiosity, and practical things like "enough sleep for work," forced me to read ahead (and then back track).

When I learned of the secret, I almost felt my heart stop. I am not a reader of science fiction, but Ishiguro stole a piece of my heart that day.

I also read the Buried Giant, which I almost quit, but once I started to understand that book, it re-affirmed my deep respect for the author. I literally couldn't stop talking about either book.


Glenn Goettel Jen wrote: "This is one of the few books, in my entire life, where I skipped ahead to find out the answer. I literally could not read fast enough to satisfy my curiosity, and practical things like "enough slee..."

Indeed. I grew up on a lot of Victorian and Nineteenth Century American fiction, because that was what was taught back then. And the mid 20th Century was not so information-rich as now. I was much more patient with gaslight reading, and took seriously the childhood injunction that skipping ahead is cheating. So I got the full intended effect of the revelation in the Gazebo. It knocked me out of my seat.


message 23: by Jen (new) - rated it 5 stars

Jen St I'm not familiar with that book, The Gazebo.


Glenn Goettel Jen wrote: "I'm not familiar with that book, The Gazebo."

Very cute. I mean, the revelation in the Gazebo in the novel "Never Let Me Go".


message 25: by Jen (new) - rated it 5 stars

Jen St Oh Glenn, I admit that I was so blown away by the revelation that I entirely forgot it took place in a gazebo. I read the book two or three years ago, and I just remember the stunning blow of finding out the truth. I didn't remember the exact setting.

Of course, then there was the movie, which undoubtedly confused everything after reading the book.


message 26: by Glenn (last edited Nov 03, 2017 08:22PM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Glenn Goettel Hey listen, Jenn, I know. "Never Let Me Go" is the second-scariest horror novel of the last millenium. My poison is depression, and she sent me into quite a spin. I've edited this to, science fiction horror, as opposed to generic horror, where the former would be more my own kind of thing.


message 27: by Luis (last edited Nov 26, 2017 10:01PM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Luis A. Boolite wrote: "I think the mistake people make with this book is assuming it is a sci fi book. It really isn't. The science is sketchy at best. I think it is more an avatar or reflection on life in general. I fou..."

I'm 100% with you. If you are reading the book expecting to place it in a well defined genre box, you will be disappointed as your mindset will be too rigidly primed.

Never Let Me Go is one of my favorite books of all time. I saw a reflection of life in it. How we are all going inexorably to the same place, to the same end, and we make things in the meantime to keep busy (like crafts or high finance or politics), and then when confronted with the inevitable, we hope that love will give us an out, that there may be a way out, but there isn't. We will all "complete" in the end.


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