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Where Late the Sweet Birds Sang
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Where Late the Sweet Birds Sang > Where Late the Sweet Birds Sang: Finished (Spoilers)

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Adelaide Blair | 995 comments Mod
This topic is for those who have finished the book. Feel free to spoil away!


message 2: by Adelaide (last edited Dec 04, 2015 01:38PM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Adelaide Blair | 995 comments Mod
I thought this was a good book, although I found the old-style humans much creepier than the clones. Due to (insert fictional science here) the nature of the clones changes over time, and (view spoiler) They tend to favor themselves over the humans, but that makes sense considering they are (view spoiler) They are just following their nature. The humans on the other hand are repulsed by the differences in clones, even though they knew from experimentation with animals that they would not be quite the same. (Although you cannot really predict human behavior from animals. Nonetheless, they should have been prepared for that.)

David and his obsession with his cousin is echoed in the behavior of the clones later on. It's interesting to speculate on whether that is a genetic trait passed down or a simple response to sex and procreation being somewhat separate.


Cheryl | 886 comments Adelaide wrote:
"David and his obsession with his cousin is echoed in the behavior of the clones later on. It's interesting to speculate on whether that is a genetic trait passed down or a simple response to sex and procreation being somewhat separate."

Great observation!


Cheryl | 886 comments Did you still see the clones as being human, or were they becoming another species?


Adelaide Blair | 995 comments Mod
I still saw them as human, but that can mean a lot of things. Genetically they were human. Behaviorally, maybe not. But human behavior has changed over time as well.


Cheryl | 886 comments Adelaide wrote: "I still saw them as human, but that can mean a lot of things. Genetically they were human. Behaviorally, maybe not. But human behavior has changed over time as well."

I saw them as evolving into another species.

The author showed them as not being able to adapt to new situations, because of the lack of individuality and the inability to think diffrently from the "hive-mind". Did you think that was a logical progression for the clones, or was the author mainly trying to prove a point ("individuals are good, group-think is bad")?


Adelaide Blair | 995 comments Mod
I dunno. Evolution sometimes takes species to dead ends, so that's possible. Although the "individual" humans in the end are just another offshoot of the clones, so it may have been likely that the clones social policies of killing off or segregating anomolies contributed to their mental decline. I don't doubt Wilhelm had some underlying political purpose behind this; it was the 70s after all.


Cheryl | 886 comments Adelaide wrote: "I don't doubt Wilhelm had some underlying political purpose behind this; it was the 70s after all."

Yes, back then "the individual versus the Establishment" was a big topic. I kind of had that in the back of my mind when reading this book.


Cheryl | 886 comments Your mention of "the clones social policies of killing off or segregating anomolies" also made me think of the Establishment suppressing new ideas from individuals. I think the author wanted to show how this would lead to the eventual decline of humanity, and used the hive-mind clone story as a kind of parable. That's my opinion, anyway.


Adelaide Blair | 995 comments Mod
Sounds legit to me!


Sarah (sarahmott) | 342 comments Reminds me of a book I once read called Earth Abides. The story was interesting, but it felt a little emotionally detached, despite the emotional content. I felt like it might be a statement about how we value artistry and creative intellectualism, and why these things are ultimately valuable.


Cheryl | 886 comments Sarah wrote:"The story was interesting, but it felt a little emotionally detached, despite the emotional content."

Yes, I agree. I liked it, but the Message was what the author thought most important in the book.


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