Around the Year in 52 Books discussion

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Progress Posts 2016 > 34: A book about mental illness

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message 1: by Brittany (last edited Jan 06, 2016 11:23AM) (new)

Brittany (gamerkiti) This topic is always hard to talk about...but in our group, there's nothing to it but to do it.

Suggestions:
Mental Health and Family
Books Every Psychology and/or Counseling Doctoral Student Should Read
YA involving mental health issues

For those of you reading in order, this is week: August 19-August 25. Don't forget to post in the A-Z title folders!

1: What are you reading this week?
2: Did you pick this book because of someone you know, or just to get a better understanding of the subject, or did someone recommend it to you for the challenge?
3: Do you think that more people should read about this mental illness to help shed light on the subject, or do you think all types of illness are "taboo" subjects in the world?


message 2: by Laura, Celestial Sphere Mod (new)

Laura | 3823 comments Mod
This week I'm reading Last Night I Sang to the Monster.

I'm in grad school right now, getting my master's in social work, so mental illness is a personal interest of mine. I wouldn't say that substance use disorders are of particular interest but the premise of this one grabbed my attention.

I think there is still a large amount of stigma around mental illness, more so with some of the disorders than others. This is particularly the case with substance use since many people believe it's a personal choice and have a hard time seeing it as a disorder. Our treatments have improved greatly in recent years but there is still a long way to go, both in the professional and public world.


message 3: by Megan (new)

Megan (bookworm_booklover) | 48 comments 1: What are you reading this week?

A Madness So Discreet

2: Did you pick this book because of someone you know, or just to get a better understanding of the subject, or did someone recommend it to you for the challenge?

This book fell into my plan by coincidence. I subscribed to Owl Crate and got it in the October box, it appears to be about a girl on the brink of madness (as per the cover synopsis). I immediately saved it remembering a mental illness was on the 2016 list. I'm excited to start reading it.

3: Do you think that more people should read about this mental illness to help shed light on the subject, or do you think all types of illness are "taboo" subjects in the world?

I think it's great that people are informed on all mental illnesses. However, I think people should be informed properly as to not end up with the current trend I've been seeing. I think these topics are becoming less taboo but still aren't fully understood and as a result we've rebounded to the other side of the spectrum. Just because a random Facebook article declares 'five signs you have ______' does not mean you have it, which seems to be what's happening these days. I wish everyone had to take an actual mental health class and see the facts not a summarized Facebook post.


message 4: by Wendorej (last edited Feb 20, 2016 11:14PM) (new)

Wendorej | 55 comments 1: What are you reading this week?
It's Kind of a Funny Story - Ned Vizzini
It's Kind of a Funny Story by Ned Vizzini

2: Did you pick this book because of someone you know, or just to get a better understanding of the subject, or did someone recommend it to you for the challenge?
This book was recommended to me by goodreads

3: Do you think that more people should read about this mental illness to help shed light on the subject, or do you think all types of illness are "taboo" subjects in the world?
I dont think any subject should be taboo. I thoroughly enjoyed this book because it can be realy hard to relate to a character dealing with mental issues if, as a reader you've never experienced these kinds of problems. But it was so easy to relate to the main character and understand where he was coming from. It was a good book to start discovering mental issues with. And i felt that it gave a really positive message.


message 5: by Katie (new)

Katie | 2369 comments I read I Was Here by Gayle Forman.

I picked this book because it was on a list of YA books dealing with mental illness. I was introduced to Gayle Forman last year and knew I wanted to read more from her, so I was excited that this fit easily into the challenge.

I feel like the mental illness in this book is stigmatized in our society. I thought it was addressed well in the novel, and the novel included a section at the end about how people can get help if they are dealing with this mental illness. I have people close to me who deal with this mental illness, so I was please that the book included that information.


message 6: by Brandy (new)

Brandy B (bybrandy) | 93 comments 1: What are you reading this week?
Challenger Deep by Neal Shusterman

2: Did you pick this book because of someone you know, or just to get a better understanding of the subject, or did someone recommend it to you for the challenge?

I actually picked this book for PopSugar 2016 's prompt National Book Award winner. However, it was such a very real feel to me that I wanted to use it for mental illness and I will pick another NBA winner later.

3: Do you think that more people should read about this mental illness to help shed light on the subject, or do you think all types of illness are "taboo" subjects in the world?

I think that really depends on the book. The last two books I had where mental illness was a theme it felt to me really like the author decided to slap a diagnosis on a character without having any experience with that and that is harmful.

That is why I wasn't thrilled about having to pick another mental illness book and spend the whole time wishing it dealt with the subject better.

That said I think mental illness is a group of diseases that people have a hard time understanding if they haven't experienced it for themselves or with a loved one. And well written books about mental illness help bridge that gap.


message 7: by Lisa (new)

Lisa (lisar87) | 33 comments Late with my post! I read this for the first week.

1: What are you reading this week?
Sickened: The Memoir of a Munchausen by Proxy Childhood by Julie Gregory

2: Did you pick this book because of someone you know, or just to get a better understanding of the subject, or did someone recommend it to you for the challenge?
I chose this book because I preferred that it was a memoir rather than a fiction novel, and I had not head of the illness before so also to learn a little.

3: Do you think that more people should read about this mental illness to help shed light on the subject, or do you think all types of illness are "taboo" subjects in the world?
I believe both are true. I might suggest other types of illnesses for people to educate themselves about before I would this one, but I think it's good to learn regardless. Illness, mental illness especially, is also unfortunately a generally taboo subject, as well.


message 8: by Silvia (new)

Silvia Turcios | 1071 comments What are you reading this week?
All the Bright Places by Jennifer Niven

Did you pick this book because of someone you know, or just to get a better understanding of the subject, or did someone recommend it to you for the challenge? I didn't know the book was about mental illnes before reading, I just read it because I heard good comments about it and it won one of Goodreads choice awards last year, but actually one person I know suffer of something similar described in the book and I didn't know this could be something so serious.

Do you think that more people should read about this mental illness to help shed light on the subject, or do you think all types of illness are "taboo" subjects in the world? Everybody should read about mental illness!


message 9: by Erica (new)

Erica | 458 comments 1: What are you reading this week?
Zombie

2: Did you pick this book because of someone you know, or just to get a better understanding of the subject, or did someone recommend it to you for the challenge?
I just thought it looked interesting.

3: Do you think that more people should read about this mental illness to help shed light on the subject, or do you think all types of illness are "taboo" subjects in the world?
I think all types of mental illness are interesting to read about.


message 10: by Julia (new)

Julia (_mj_howard) Last Night I Sang to the Monster by Benjamin Alire Sáenz

I got this from the list provided for suggestions.


message 11: by Kimberly (new)

Kimberly Costa (kimcosta) 1:What are you reading this week?
Wintergirls
2: Did you pick this book because of someone you know, or just to get a better understanding of the subject, or did someone recommend it to you for the challenge?
I chose this book because of someone I know suffers from anorexia and self-harm.
3: Do you think that more people should read about this mental illness to help shed light on the subject, or do you think all types of illness are "taboo" subjects in the world?
I think it should be brought to light of how serious mental illness can affect a person in their health and social life and not be treated as a taboo


message 12: by Marta (last edited Jan 31, 2016 11:05AM) (new)

Marta (gezemice) | 784 comments I just finished The Bell Jar by Sylvia Plath. I wanted to read it for a while and it fit perfectly fir this week.

This book is a reminder how far we have come from the fifties where people got shock treaments, were locked into asylums, and were desperately hiding their mental health issues because people would avoid them like the plague.

Mental issues are still somewhat of a stigma, but our understanding and treatment options have improved by leaps and bounds. therapists, Prozac and its cousins make treatment of depression easy and available to anyone. We still have a long way to go, of course.

There are many different mental conditions and I believe we should all educate ourselves to be more accepting of people who might have trouble fitting in. There are many common conditions (not illnesses, these people are perfectly fine, just different) that affect ability to learn social rules or pick up social cues, such as ADHD, autism, depression, anxiety, and we are so quick to judgment when someone is shy, does not respond to emails, says the wrong thing, does not understand jokes, does not know small talk or reacts differently to things than us. If we accept people for who they are, we often find that their difference is exciting and delightful.

Thankfully, treatments have come long way and kids who cannot learn social cues from observation are now explicitely taught, instead of being shunned as "weird".


message 13: by Malgorzata (new)

Malgorzata | 18 comments I used to read a lot of books revolving around mental illness and, occasionally, I still do. There's quite a few of those on my TBR list. I picked Shoot the Damn Dog: A Memoir of Depression and must say I really enjoyed it. It's honest, it doesn't romanticise depression, and it's well written.


message 14: by Kira (new)

Kira | 9 comments Speak by Laurie Halse Anderson This is the third challenge I chose to complete and for the challenge I read Speak by Laurie Halse Anderson. While this book never outright says our main character has a mental illness, anyone who has read this book can agree the presence of mental illness is obvious. I chose to read this book because it a modern classic and it feels like I am the only one who has not read it, but I am so glad I finally got around to it.


message 15: by Malgorzata (last edited Feb 08, 2016 05:34AM) (new)

Malgorzata | 18 comments Annika wrote: "Malgorzata wrote: "I used to read a lot of books revolving around mental illness and, occasionally, I still do. There's quite a few of those on my TBR list. I picked Shoot the Damn Dog: A Mem..."</i>

No worries :) Think [book:The Silver Linings Playbook
(both protagonists struggle with mental problems, but in the end, love conquers all) or books by John Green that appeal to so many impressionable teens.



message 16: by Jody (new)

Jody (jodybell) | 3469 comments Annika wrote: "There are books that romanticize depression? How? Am I stupid for never noticing? Sorry, I'm really curious! :) "

Lots of YA books tend to romanticise depression - I found it particularly bad in All the Bright Places. It's the whole romantic, tortured teen thing. As someone that suffers from quite severe depression, there is certainly nothing romantic or appealing about it. :(


message 17: by Chealsea (new)

Chealsea Reads Malgorzata

I didn't get the impression that Quick was romanticizing mental illness in Silver Linings. They did not rely on one another to fix their problems, which is most common in YA mental health fiction, both were seeking counseling if I remember correctly. At the end they still had their struggles to deal with, but they were choosing to make room for each other while continuing to work on them. Not to mention Pat Sr...he was well on in age and had mental issues of his own to deal with. Though Matthew Quick is one of my favorite authors and Silver Linings is top of the list for me, so that could be a bias cloud.


message 18: by Bec (new)

Bec | 768 comments Interesting take on romanticising depression. I didn't consider that at all when reading All the Bright places, but I guess the whole story through I was hoping that the relationship would be enough to get him through it. But I know in reality it doesn't work like this. I've had second hand experience with depression as my husband attempted suicide and you do think why wasn't I (and the kids) enough for him to live for.
That said, I did enjoy All the bright places.


message 19: by Rachel (new)

Rachel A. (abyssallibrarian) | 2633 comments 1: What are you reading this week?
I chose All the Bright Places

2: Did you pick this book because of someone you know, or just to get a better understanding of the subject, or did someone recommend it to you for the challenge?
I do have experience with a family member who suffered from severe anxiety and depression, as well as a few close friends who have mental health conditions. I also have a degree in psychology, so I've learned about many mental health disorders. However, I chose this book specifically because of how much I heard about it in the past year on GoodReads and Youtube.


3: Do you think that more people should read about this mental illness to help shed light on the subject, or do you think all types of illness are "taboo" subjects in the world?
I definitely think more people should read about mental illness in general, especially given how common it seems to be now. Even though fictional books may not be the most accurate source of information, it at least gets people thinking about mental illness and maybe to do some real research to find out the facts or opens a discussion. These kinds of conditions really should never be treated as taboo, otherwise people will be afraid to ask for help.


message 20: by Valerie (new)

Valerie | 351 comments 1: What are you reading this week?

I am reading Sanders' Starfish

2: Did you pick this book because of someone you know, or just to get a better understanding of the subject, or did someone recommend it to you for the challenge?

It was a free book from Bookbub, which I thought would be interesting. It was also getting pushed farther and farther back on my TBR list, so I decided to read it for this challenge.

3: Do you think that more people should read about this mental illness to help shed light on the subject, or do you think all types of illness are "taboo" subjects in the world?

Mental illness is a painful subject which most people would prefer to sweep under the rug. As a retired school counselor, I saw many cases of mental illness among my students and among their parents. Of course, as a school counselor, there was little I could do to help the situation, but I needed to be up-to-date on what was going on in order to help when I could. Amazingly I was the only person who diagnosed a student with paranoid schizophrenia, even though she had been under treatment for several years, but her claims of people talking behind her back were taken for normal middle-school behavior.

Certainly light should be shed on the subject, as more people would be in treatment were this to happen. Their lives would be more productive and happier. However, family secrets continue to dominate the world in which we live.


message 21: by Monique (new)

Monique | 66 comments What are you reading this week?
My Heart and Other Black Holes by Jasmine Warga
My Heart and Other Black Holes
Did you pick this book because of someone you know, or just to get a better understanding of the subject, or did someone recommend it to you for the challenge?
This book was added to my TBR list last year after someone I knew read it during mental illness awareness week and I bought this over the new year holiday break to read.
Do you think that more people should read about this mental illness to help shed light on the subject, or do you think all types of illness are "taboo" subjects in the world?
I definitely think more people should read about mental illnesses especially from the perspective of someone with a mental illness.


message 22: by Aline (new)

Aline (thousanduniverses) | 201 comments 1. I'm reading Your Voice Is All I Hear

2. I've picked it because I know someone who has schizophrenia, like the boy in this book. Also I have friends who are suffering from Depression and Panic Attacks. And I myself have an anxiety disorder. So I'm interested in the whole topic of mental illness.

3. I like that the topic surrounding mental illness got less of a taboo over the past years. But I think we still have a really long way to go. Especially with the acceptance in every day life and prejudices. People should get more educated about different mental illnesses, would be a good idea to talk about it in school since that isn't a topic in lessons at all.


message 23: by Pauline (new)

Pauline C | 71 comments 1. This week I'm reading 600 Hours of Edward

2. I picked this book because it has been on my Kindle a while and seems to fit the subject. I'm interpreting this theme quite broadly, as it is about mental conditions ... Aspergers and OCD ... which I'm not sure whether you would exactly class as mental illness, but I thought it was close enough to use for the challenge. Reading the blurb I'm hoping it might be similar toe of novel to The Rosie Project which I really enjoyed.

3. No I don't think it should be taboo so long as sensitively handled.


message 24: by Katy (new)

Katy  (kittybimble) 1: What are you reading this week?
The Perks of Being a Wallflower by Stephen Chbosky
The Perks of Being a Wallflower by Stephen Chbosky
2: Did you pick this book because of someone you know, or just to get a better understanding of the subject, or did someone recommend it to you for the challenge?
This book was on one of the lists provided for this category.
3: Do you think that more people should read about this mental illness to help shed light on the subject, or do you think all types of illness are "taboo" subjects in the world?
I don't think any kind of mental illness should be a taboo, if anything there needs to be more books exploring mental health issues.


message 25: by Beth (new)

Beth | 126 comments 1: What are you reading this week?
I am reading Furiously Happy: A Funny Book About Horrible Things by Jenny Lawson

2: Did you pick this book because of someone you know, or just to get a better understanding of the subject, or did someone recommend it to you for the challenge?
I wanted to read this book anyway (I mean it has a taxidermied raccoon on the cover. Who wouldn't want to read this?!) I love books that mix humor and absurdity with the dark and serious. And this book did that very well.

3: Do you think that more people should read about this mental illness to help shed light on the subject, or do you think all types of illness are "taboo" subjects in the world?
I definitely think that people should read this book. It gives the reader an inside look at what it is like to live with mental illness. And it's funny. Seriously, the epilogue of this book is beautiful. A work of art.

Mental illness is something we definitely don't talk about enough (in the U.S. at least, probably other places too.) My best friend's son is living with mental illness and his journey over the last few years has really opened my eyes. Not talking about mental illness leads to it continuing to be stigmatized and criminalized, and keeps mental health care underfunded. Let's keep reading, writing, and talking about it!


message 26: by Libscigrl (new)

Libscigrl (animlgrl) | 39 comments For this week, I attempted to read The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat and Other Clinical Tales by Oliver Sacks.

It sounded good and is on several 'must read' lists, but it was too clinical for me. I stopped reading after about three chapters.


message 27: by Aine (new)

Aine | 173 comments What are you reading this week?
The View on the Way Down by Rebecca Wait

Did you pick this book because of someone you know, or just to get a better understanding of the subject, or did someone recommend it to you for the challenge?
Not really, I was intrigued by the premise. A young man leaves home on the day of his brother's funeral. Never to return, never to be spoken of by his family. I didn't seek out a book on depression, but I regularly happen upon them because they make interesting reading. It's good that depression is written about as a normal part of peoples' lives and portrayed as a part of our reality.

Do you think that more people should read about this mental illness to help shed light on the subject, or do you think all types of illness are "taboo" subjects in the world?
I think one of the greatest ways in which we can empathise we others is to read their stories. Depression isn't something that can be explained logically so it really lends itself to expression in other ways. Fiction is a powerful way to tell the stories of both those who live with depression, and those who witness it in the people they love.


message 28: by Michelle (new)

Michelle (girlvsbook) | 1176 comments 1. What are you reading this week? I read What Lies Between Us by Nayomi Munaweera

2. Did you pick this book because of someone you know, or just to get a better understanding of the subject, or did someone recommend it to you for the challenge? I actually planned to read this for a different challenge (PopSugar - A Book Set on an Island) but, after reading it, it seemed like a better fit here. I originally picked it up, like so many books, because the cover was gorgeous.

3. Do you think that more people should read about this mental illness to help shed light on the subject, or do you think all types of illness are "taboo" subjects in the world? The mental illnesses that the main character in this book faces are never named. She has the unfortunate experience of being molested as a child and deals with the emotional wounds of that as she grows up and into her adult years. There may also be some postpartum depression but, again, it's never formally named. I'm not sure that this book is the kind of book one would read to gain insight into a particular mental illness. It's not a hopeful story.


message 29: by Manda (new)

Manda (bookwenchmanda) | 1094 comments What are you reading this week?
The Shock of the Fall, also known as Where the Moon Isn't

The Shock of the Fall by Nathan Filer or Where the Moon Isn't by Nathan Filer

Did you pick this book because of someone you know, or just to get a better understanding of the subject, or did someone recommend it to you for the challenge? I picked it because I have an educational and career background in psychology. I've read a lot of educational literature about mental health issues. Some times reading fictional stuff can be overly draining for me, depending on how things are at work, but this seemed to be really interesting and worth the read.

Do you think that more people should read about this mental illness to help shed light on the subject, or do you think all types of illness are "taboo" subjects in the world?
While I will always encourage people to read about mental health, especially nonfiction, I think people should read what they are comfortable with. Nothing should be taboo, but pushing certain topics on people could trigger things for them that you did not know about, and they were not prepared for.


message 30: by Night Owl (new)

Night Owl Reader (allnightreading) 1: What are you reading this week?
Finding Audrey by Sophie Kinsella
I don't actually know if this counts, but the main character did mention one time that she knows her illness is illogical, but her brain still reacts to it.

2: Did you pick this book because of someone you know, or just to get a better understanding of the subject, or did someone recommend it to you for the challenge?
I picked this up because I heard BookTubers talking about it, and it sounded really really good. I am now reading The Chinese Version of it, and I am really liking it.

3: Do you think that more people should read about this mental illness to help shed light on the subject, or do you think all types of illness are "taboo" subjects in the world?
I'm not sure, I think people should read this book because it is a good heartwarming story that is also well-written. I don't think Illnesses are a taboo subject, they're just a more serious topic that should be handled well and truthfully.


message 31: by Pam (new)

Pam (bluegrasspam) | 2524 comments Brandy wrote: "1: What are you reading this week?
Challenger Deep by Neal Shusterman

2: Did you pick this book because of someone you know, or just to get a better understanding of the subject, or did someone re..."


I absolutley loved this book! Instead of describing mental illness, you experience it.


message 32: by Pam (new)

Pam (bluegrasspam) | 2524 comments 1. I am reading Andy Warhol was a Hoarder: Inside the Minds of History's Great Personalities Andy Warhol was a Hoarder Inside the Minds of History's Great Personalities by Claudia Kalb .

2. I picked this book up because I saw it on the new non-fiction shelf at the library and I thought, "What in the world?!" Between the cover and the title, I was intrigued. I didn't realize it was about celebrities with mental health issues, until I started reading it.

3. This book delves into numerous mental health issues by examining one famous person who suffered from each illness/syndrome and providing history about the person's struggle and how it is treated currently. It is fascinating and I think people should read the book. Everyone knows someone, if not themselves, who has struggled with something - depression, anxiety, hoarding, eating disorder, etc. It is easier to help yourself or someone else, if you understand the struggle and the available treatments. I don't think that any illness should be considered taboo.


message 33: by Debra (new)

Debra | 374 comments 1: What are you reading this week?
I read The Virgin Suicides by Jeffrey Eugenides

2: Did you pick this book because of someone you know, or just to get a better understanding of the subject, or did someone recommend it to you for the challenge?
I chose this book because I enjoyed another of Eugenides' books - Middlesex

3: Do you think that more people should read about this mental illness to help shed light on the subject, or do you think all types of illness are "taboo" subjects in the world?
People should read a lot of different things to shed light on many subjects.


message 34: by Kelly (new)

Kelly Brown | 379 comments 1: What are you reading this week? Where We Belong

2: Did you pick this book because of someone you know, or just to get a better understanding of the subject, or did someone recommend it to you for the challenge? I randomly picked to read the summary of this book and liked it. It was one of many choices for my Prime free reads. I saw that it would fit in the challenge- bonus!

3: Do you think that more people should read about this mental illness to help shed light on the subject, or do you think all types of illness are "taboo" subjects in the world? This book had a character with Autism. I found it enlightening to see how a sibling reacts to the world having a sister with Autism. Knowledge is power. The more people that know about any mental illness- the better. Then it wouldn't feel taboo. My daughter has ADHD and other parents have mixed reactions when they find out. I just tell her that her brain works differently and excessive energy is her superpower.


message 35: by Anastasia (new)

Anastasia (anastasiaharris) | 1305 comments 1: What are you reading this week?
Until Tuesday: A Wounded Warrior and the Golden Retriever Who Saved Him

2: Did you pick this book because of someone you know, or just to get a better understanding of the subject, or did someone recommend it to you for the challenge?
There are so many reasons why I picked this book. PTSD is not an illness that is spoken of. Many different types of people suffer from it not just soldiers; firemen, first responders, policemen, paramedics, bystanders.
It first came to my attention many years ago when "Saving Private Ryan" was in theatres. Veterans were having difficulties watching the movie due to the realism of the beach landings and it made the news. Recently the Marvel movies have been bringing it back to mainstream cinema with Ironman's obvious problems.
This book was also intersting because my dog and I volunteer as a Therapy Dog team at our local retirement/nursing home. We go in on a weekly basis to visit with the residents hoping to bring some sunshine into their lives. On a personal level I have seen how a dog, even one with little training, can bring a some relief to people who are hurting. We do not come even close to what Tuesday does for Luis. It is amazing what he does.

3: Do you think that more people should read about this mental illness to help shed light on the subject, or do you think all types of illness are "taboo" subjects in the world?

All illnesses are difficult. How does a healthy person interact with someone dealing with such deep problems without sounding condensending. Books, magazine articles, newspaper stories, movies, tv shows, all of these things bring those of us who are not experiencing or have not experienced what others are closer to understanding and hopefully empathy.


message 36: by Helin (new)

Helin Puksand | 43 comments 1: What are you reading this week?
Before I Go to Sleep by S.J. Watson
2: Did you pick this book because of someone you know, or just to get a better understanding of the subject, or did someone recommend it to you for the challenge?
I knew this book is about amnesia.
3: Do you think that more people should read about this mental illness to help shed light on the subject, or do you think all types of illness are "taboo" subjects in the world?
Of course people shoud read about amnesia or any other mental illness. This book was very interesting and obsessive.


message 37: by Miki Mackennedy (new)

Miki Mackennedy Brain on Fire: My Month of Madness

2. This was recommended to me. I found it very very interesting.
3. I certainly don't think the subject is taboo. the more we learn, the more we are able to heal, cope and adapt.


message 38: by Lieke (new)

Lieke | 709 comments 1: What are you reading this week?
I read Paaz by Myrthe van der Meer

2: Did you pick this book because of someone you know, or just to get a better understanding of the subject, or did someone recommend it to you for the challenge?
I read this book because my sister has been admitted to a PAAZ (not sure what that is in English).

3: Do you think that more people should read about this mental illness to help shed light on the subject, or do you think all types of illness are "taboo" subjects in the world?
People could read more about illnesses to get a better understanding of other people.


message 39: by Andrea (last edited Jun 16, 2016 09:21PM) (new)

Andrea | 379 comments 1: What are you reading this week?
The Psychopath Test A Journey Through the Madness Industry by Jon Ronson
The Psychopath Test: A Journey Through the Madness Industry by Jon Ronson

2: Did you pick this book because of someone you know, or just to get a better understanding of the subject, or did someone recommend it to you for the challenge?
I chose this title to learn more about the topic.

3: Do you think that more people should read about this mental illness to help shed light on the subject, or do you think all types of illness are "taboo" subjects in the world?
It would benefit society to know details about this condition.


message 40: by J (new)

J Austill | 673 comments 1: What are you reading this week?

One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest by Ken Kesey

2: Did you pick this book because of someone you know, or just to get a better understanding of the subject, or did someone recommend it to you for the challenge?

I chose this book because I loved the film and I know that books are often better than their film counterparts.

3: Do you think that more people should read about this mental illness to help shed light on the subject, or do you think all types of illness are "taboo" subjects in the world?

This book is more about the system which classifies people as mentally ill and how it does or does not try to treat the illness. This is definitely a topic that everyone should know about and be concerned about as any of use could have a loved one end up in an institution. It should be a primary concern of a society to help its mentally ill and to correctly identify people as such.


message 41: by Joy (new)

Joy | 106 comments 1. What are you reading this week?
Saving CeeCee Honeycutt by Beth Hoffman
2: Did you pick this book because of someone you know, or just to get a better understanding of the subject, or did someone recommend it to you for the challenge?
Actually, I read it because it was recommended by a member of my book club, and I didn't know that it was about mental illness until after I started it.
3: Do you think that more people should read about this mental illness to help shed light on the subject, or do you think all types of illness are "taboo" subjects in the world?
I think there is a taboo about mental illness in American culture, but it is also very generation-specific. We seem to have trends of labels and treatments.


message 42: by Kirsten (new)

Kirsten  (kmcripn) What did you read?
Deadly Messengers by Susan May

Did you pick this book because of someone you know, or just to get a better understanding of the subject, or did someone recommend it to you for the challenge?
No, I read it for another book group. Just happenstance it highlighted depression.

Do you think that more people should read about this mental illness to help shed light on the subject, or do you think all types of illness are "taboo" subjects in the world?
Yes. If more people were aware of mental illness, maybe there would be better care available. Many insurance companies don't even treat it like the rest of health care. Also, many people that are mentally ill don't get the care they need, yet they are more than able to buy a gun. Priorities, people!


message 43: by Angela (new)

Angela | 397 comments 1: What are you reading this week?
Running with Scissors, by Augusten Burroughs
Running with Scissors by Augusten Burroughs

2: Did you pick this book because of someone you know, or just to get a better understanding of the subject, or did someone recommend it to you for the challenge?
I just came across it in the recommended reading lists for this topic. I had heard positive reviews about it previously, and thought I'd give it a go.

3: Do you think that more people should read about this mental illness to help shed light on the subject, or do you think all types of illness are "taboo" subjects in the world?
Definitely, the more we read and learn about mental health conditions and issues, the greater understanding and empathy we have about them, and the less people will have to suffer in silence and isolation.


message 44: by Samantha (new)

Samantha | 906 comments 1: What are you reading this week? The Kind Worth Killing
2: Did you pick this book because of someone you know, or just to get a better understanding of the subject, or did someone recommend it to you for the challenge? I am not sure I picked in the spirt the topic was intended. I feel like I deal with to much real mental illness to read any serious on the subject. So instead I choose a suspense novel I had been wanting to read that involves sociopaths.
3: Do you think that more people should read about this mental illness to help shed light on the subject, or do you think all types of illness are "taboo" subjects in the world? I think Mental Illness is something that people should have an awareness of and it should not be considered a taboo subject. That being said I think that it can be a difficult subject and may not be something everyone want to read about.


message 45: by Therese (last edited Jul 28, 2016 12:52PM) (new)

Therese  I just finished The Vegetarian by Han Kang.

I picked this book up because it was about a vegetarian and was compared to The Yellow Wallpaper and Other Stories by Charlotte Perkins Gilman. I also have seen a number of South Korean tv shows and was struck by the importance of meat in some of the shows.

This book is interesting in how it approaches mental illness and delves into the cultural component of mental illness. I am not sure I would recommend this book unless I knew the person would be interested in reading about culture's influence on mental illness.


message 46: by Kathy (new)

Kathy | 2199 comments 1: What are you reading this week?

Brain on Fire: My Month of Madness

2: Did you pick this book because of someone you know, or just to get a better understanding of the subject, or did someone recommend it to you for the challenge?

I've heard this book is good and well-written so I went with it.

3: Do you think that more people should read about this mental illness to help shed light on the subject, or do you think all types of illness are "taboo" subjects in the world?

I think the more we talk about/read about mental illness, the better the chance of understanding it.


message 47: by Lyndi (new)

Lyndi (mibookobsession) I read The Things We Keep about a woman with early onset Alzheimer's disease.
I work in a nursing home and help a lot of elderly Alzheimer patients, but this woman is only 38, my age, which is terrifying.
As the cases of Alzheimer's are on the rise and more patients and families are affected, even a work of fiction might help people to identify or sympathise more with the symptoms and the depression and anger that go along with it.


message 48: by Zaz (new)

Zaz | 3034 comments 1: What are you reading this week? The Virgin Suicides

2: Did you pick this book because of someone you know, or just to get a better understanding of the subject, or did someone recommend it to you for the challenge?
None of this, it's just because it's often listed (and I like to check things in lists :p), it's a classic and I don't know the story. I'm well aware of the state/reasons leading people to suicide and was pleasantly surprised the 1st time I read a book dealing well with the topic. I had other books that fitted the "better understanding" but didn't pick them in the end for this category :)

3: Do you think that more people should read about this mental illness to help shed light on the subject, or do you think all types of illness are "taboo" subjects in the world?
I think people should read about mental illness because when you don't have them, it's impossible to understand what people actually live and you tend to dismiss their decisions or reactions. Humankind isn't comfortable with difference so when difference becomes the normality (through books, movies or tv shows), it helps a lot.


message 49: by oliviasbooks (last edited Aug 13, 2016 01:14PM) (new)

oliviasbooks | 106 comments 1: What are you reading this week?
I Was Here by Gayle Forman

2: Did you pick this book because of someone you know, or just to get a better understanding of the subject, or did someone recommend it to you for the challenge?
I had the book anyway, but was reluctant to pick it up. There are (just a little) too many teen books about mental illness and/or suicide around at the moment. It's quite a hype.

3: Do you think that more people should read about this mental illness to help shed light on the subject, or do you think all types of illness are "taboo" subjects in the world?
No, I think it's better to help people/readers understand themselves or their friends - particularly as depression is concerned. In thisYA book I liked it that the depression was not romaticised. It was the survivor, the narrating best friend, who got the - also more or less superfluous - romance.


message 50: by Anna (new)

Anna | 969 comments 1: What are you reading this week?
The Rosie Project by Graeme Simsion.

2: Did you pick this book because of someone you know, or just to get a better understanding of the subject, or did someone recommend it to you for the challenge?
I read it just because...and at the end I realized that it fits this prompt, as Asperger's syndrome is a mental condition we should know about as it is quite frequent. I have a friend and also a colleague whose son is autistic - they are at the two ends of the spectrum, one only slightly affected, the other doesn't speak at all.

3: Do you think that more people should read about this mental illness to help shed light on the subject, or do you think all types of illness are "taboo" subjects in the world?
I think illness including mental illness should be talked about to be able to relate to them.


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