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Just for Fun! > Phrases that annoy/puzzle you? Or What makes me grit my teeth

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message 1: by Phrynne, Series Queen! (new)

Phrynne | 11694 comments Mod
Some conversation in another thread discovered that Bette is worried by the expression keep your "eyes peeled"' Sharon wonders about heads that swivel and Sally wants to know how on earth eyes can twinkle. Are there any phrases you see regularly in books that annoy you or make you feel uncomfortable?


message 2: by Brenda, Aussie Authors Queen (new)

Brenda | 70543 comments Mod
I agree about "sparkling eyes" and "twinkling eyes" - I've often wondered what they'd look like;) Another one - the eyes "shot sparks" of rage! lol Really??


message 3: by Brenda, Aussie Authors Queen (new)

Brenda | 70543 comments Mod
There are so many when you think about it - "tears her hair out"! Ouch...


message 4: by Sharon (new)

Sharon Robards (sharonrobards) | 944 comments Eyes snapping open


message 5: by B the BookAddict (last edited Nov 25, 2015 12:23PM) (new)

B the BookAddict (bthebookaddict) | 3432 comments Brenda, yes, that one makes my scalp twitch:)

I like 'by the seat of your pants', it always makes me see someone sailing thru the air with their knickers flapping, lol.


message 6: by Phrynne, Series Queen! (new)

Phrynne | 11694 comments Mod
That's a great visual Bette:)


message 7: by Brenda, Aussie Authors Queen (new)

Brenda | 70543 comments Mod
B the BookAddict wrote: "Brenda, yes, that one makes my scalp twitch:)

I like 'by the seat of your pants', it always makes me see someone sailing thru the air with their knickers flapping, lol."


Hahahaha!!!!


message 8: by Anna (new)

Anna Faversham (annafaversham) | 246 comments Brenda wrote: "I agree about "sparkling eyes" and "twinkling eyes" - I've often wondered what they'd look like;) Another one - the eyes "shot sparks" of rage! lol Really??"

Oh I've seen them! Quite special! Twinkling eyes, that is, not shooting sparks.


message 9: by Phrynne, Series Queen! (new)

Phrynne | 11694 comments Mod
I read one that had eyes sparking just yesterday. It sounds very dangerous


message 10: by Brenda, Aussie Authors Queen (new)

Brenda | 70543 comments Mod
Haha!!!


message 11: by Marianne (new)

Marianne (cloggiedownunder) | 8388 comments Phrynne wrote: "I read one that had eyes sparking just yesterday. It sounds very dangerous"

are you sure they weren't sparkling and you didn't see the L?


message 12: by B the BookAddict (new)

B the BookAddict (bthebookaddict) | 3432 comments lol:)


message 13: by Phrynne, Series Queen! (new)

Phrynne | 11694 comments Mod
With the standard of editing being what it is today maybe the L just wasn't there:)
On that topic the book I am currently reading on Kindle keeps running out of capital letters. Whole paragraphs keep occurring with no capitals at all. It is disconcerting.


message 14: by Brenda, Aussie Authors Queen (new)

Brenda | 70543 comments Mod
That's poor formatting isn't it Phrynne!!!


message 15: by Phrynne, Series Queen! (new)

Phrynne | 11694 comments Mod
Very!


message 16: by K (new)

K | 1143 comments "Mound" for a woman's vagina and "manhood" and the like for a man's penis in romance books. For goodness sake, just call them what they are! It drives me up the wall.


message 17: by Phrynne, Series Queen! (new)

Phrynne | 11694 comments Mod
Kiera wrote: ""Mound" for a woman's vagina and "manhood" and the like for a man's penis in romance books. For goodness sake, just call them what they are! It drives me up the wall."

There are probably more euphemisms used in that genre than in all the others put together:)


message 18: by Sharon (new)


message 19: by Phrynne, Series Queen! (new)

Phrynne | 11694 comments Mod
I'll bet it does:)


message 20: by Sharon (last edited Jan 09, 2016 05:55PM) (new)

Sharon Robards (sharonrobards) | 944 comments Just realised I'd never added it to my shelf LOL - Problem fixed :D


message 21: by Laura (new)

Laura | 4299 comments Ending a sentence with the word "mind". Kinda like shortened down version of "mind you" which doesn't irk me but "mind" by itself does! lolol


message 22: by Marianne (new)

Marianne (cloggiedownunder) | 8388 comments I book I just finished refers to a woman's "button". Circa 1928.


message 23: by Phrynne, Series Queen! (new)

Phrynne | 11694 comments Mod
Just heard about someone whose jaw was unhinged in shock and another whose eyebrows hit the ceiling.


message 24: by Susan (new)

Susan (goodreadscomsusanaustralia) | 427 comments Laura wrote: "Ending a sentence with the word "mind". Kinda like shortened down version of "mind you" which doesn't irk me but "mind" by itself does!"

Some people use that term in casual conversation. I'm trying to place it — northern England perhaps?


message 25: by Susan (new)

Susan (goodreadscomsusanaustralia) | 427 comments Marianne wrote: "I book I just finished refers to a woman's "button". Circa 1928."

That was probably very racy back then! [Clutches pearls]


message 26: by Brenda, Aussie Authors Queen (new)

Brenda | 70543 comments Mod
Phrynne wrote: "Just heard about someone whose jaw was unhinged in shock and another whose eyebrows hit the ceiling."

LOLOL!!!!!!!


message 27: by Brenda, Aussie Authors Queen (new)

Brenda | 70543 comments Mod
Susan wrote: "Marianne wrote: "I book I just finished refers to a woman's "button". Circa 1928."

That was probably very racy back then! [Clutches pearls]"


Haha!


message 28: by K (new)

K | 1143 comments Laura wrote: "Ending a sentence with the word "mind". Kinda like shortened down version of "mind you" which doesn't irk me but "mind" by itself does! lolol"

That's very Welsh. I often see that in UK novels. I like it actually- but then I pretty much love most things UK related. Lol.


message 29: by Phrynne, Series Queen! (new)

Phrynne | 11694 comments Mod
When my children were teenagers the word added to EVERY sentence was 'but'. As in "School was so boring today but." I always asked them "But what?" and eventually they stopped.


message 30: by Brenda, Aussie Authors Queen (new)

Brenda | 70543 comments Mod
Yes that's a very annoying addition! Also the use of "like" anywhere and everywhere in a sentence!


message 31: by Sally906 (new)

Sally906 Phrynne wrote: "Just heard about someone whose jaw was unhinged in shock and another whose eyebrows hit the ceiling."

That is so painful when your eyebrows hit the ceiling. LOL!


message 32: by Sally906 (new)

Sally906 Phrynne wrote: "When my children were teenagers the word added to EVERY sentence was 'but'. As in "School was so boring today but." I always asked them "But what?" and eventually they stopped."

oh I loathed - but Seems to have died away now - but what is so popular now - and I really dislike is people finishing off a conversation with "...have a good one..."

It really, really annoys me - I almost scream at the person who says it HAVE A GOOD WHAT!!?

Did I say it really, really annoys me :)


message 33: by Brenda, Aussie Authors Queen (new)

Brenda | 70543 comments Mod
Haha!


message 34: by PattyMacDotComma (new)

PattyMacDotComma | 1827 comments "So" . . . it seems that every answer to questions in interviews and such begins with SO.

I have a feeling it has replaced "Well", which we often preface remarks with to indicate we're thinking about our answer. A kind of stalling tactic.

When the sentence starts with "So", it seems it should be following on from something said earlier. Anyway, it's become weird to me now.


message 35: by B the BookAddict (last edited Feb 03, 2016 12:25PM) (new)

B the BookAddict (bthebookaddict) | 3432 comments Patty, Yes Yes Yes Yes. Thank you for mentioning that. It really irritates me that so many people start a sentence with the word 'So'. You hear it on tv in interviews and conversations. Not only is it grammatically incorrect, it leaves me wondering 'did I miss something they said earlier'.


message 36: by Leonie (new)

Leonie (leonierogers) | 3225 comments B the BookAddict wrote: "Patty, Yes Yes Yes Yes. Thank you for mentioning that. It really irritates me that so many people start a sentence with the word 'So'. You hear it on tv in interviews and conversations. Not only is..."

There was a fad for 'active listening' - in the nineties I think it was - which encouraged people (upon whom the active listening courses were inflicted) to use the word 'so' at the beginning of a sentence to demonstrate how enthusiastically you were listening to the other person.

eg. "So, you really struggled with that person's attitude?"


message 37: by Sally906 (new)

Sally906 courses have a lot to answer to!!!


message 38: by Brenda, Aussie Authors Queen (new)

Brenda | 70543 comments Mod
B the BookAddict wrote: "Patty, Yes Yes Yes Yes. Thank you for mentioning that. It really irritates me that so many people start a sentence with the word 'So'. You hear it on tv in interviews and conversations. Not only is..."

I've noticed (and been annoyed by) it in blogs too!!!


message 39: by Brenda, Aussie Authors Queen (new)

Brenda | 70543 comments Mod
Leonie wrote: "B the BookAddict wrote: "Patty, Yes Yes Yes Yes. Thank you for mentioning that. It really irritates me that so many people start a sentence with the word 'So'. You hear it on tv in interviews and c..."

That's a question which feels better - but when it's a statement - "So I was going to read this book..." No!


message 40: by Leonie (new)

Leonie (leonierogers) | 3225 comments Brenda wrote: "Leonie wrote: "B the BookAddict wrote: "Patty, Yes Yes Yes Yes. Thank you for mentioning that. It really irritates me that so many people start a sentence with the word 'So'. You hear it on tv in i..."

I feel your pain ;)


message 41: by Brenda, Aussie Authors Queen (new)

Brenda | 70543 comments Mod
lol!


message 42: by B the BookAddict (last edited Feb 04, 2016 09:10AM) (new)

B the BookAddict (bthebookaddict) | 3432 comments Leonie, So I know you just have to be joking about that, lol:) They encouraged people to use it? omg, I am so behind the times, (shaking my head).


message 43: by B the BookAddict (last edited Feb 04, 2016 09:12AM) (new)

B the BookAddict (bthebookaddict) | 3432 comments You know, when I complain about stuff like this, I have a friend who says "yes, but B, remember that language is always evolving". Somehow that just makes me even more annoyed - I don't have to like how it's evolving!


message 44: by Phrynne, Series Queen! (new)

Phrynne | 11694 comments Mod
Exactly Bette. Some of the evolution is good, some of it is just awful!


message 45: by Sally906 (new)

Sally906 Some days I feel that language is devolving - I saw a review once where the person complained the author used 'big words' - it was chick lit for goodness sake!!!

Are authors now suppose to dumb down the words they use?

I love discovering new words - and one great aspect of using an eBook is being able to press my finger on the word and the dictionary tells me what the meaning is.

Note: this doesn't work for physical books! You can hold that finger on the page as long as you like - no definition is going to pop up on the page!!!


Jülie ☼♄  | 6327 comments Sounds like some antics semantics goin' on in this thread :)


message 47: by PattyMacDotComma (new)

PattyMacDotComma | 1827 comments I remember being told not to use a big word when a small one would do, but sometimes a humongous word is just right, too. :)


Jülie ☼♄  | 6327 comments Humongous is a pretty big word Patty., :)


message 49: by PattyMacDotComma (new)

PattyMacDotComma | 1827 comments Ginormous!


message 50: by Phrynne, Series Queen! (new)

Phrynne | 11694 comments Mod
Gargantuan even.


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