The Black Moon (Poldark, #5) The Black Moon discussion


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Poldark Saga discussion group

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Tanya You are invited to join the discussion group Poldark Saga - Winston Graham

This is a group for lovers of the Poldark Saga, whether you read them years ago or recently, this place is for you. We talk about every aspect of the books, the relationships within them and those created outside of them. Each book has its own folder so you may join the conversation regardless of how far in the series you have read.


Conchita Macario I don't have a comment but I do have a question. What does this mean...."God, thought Ross, it does work, and how unfairly, but I want her, not any other, not the most beautiful... " I do not understand this passage. Can someone explain this to me.


Conchita Macario Does it mean that Ross is starting to have feelings for Caroline as Demelza had warned him?


Tanya Conchita wrote: "Does it mean that Ross is starting to have feelings for Caroline as Demelza had warned him?"

I understood it to mean that Ross is realizing he loves Demelza and only Demelza. The "her" in the passage is Demelza. He's over Elizabeth and even though Demelza is older now, it's her that he loves.


Conchita Macario I know the statement after that "but" refers to Demelza no question about it. It is what Ross was thinking that he said in his mind it does work. What is that thing that is working and why he thinks it unfairly. And then that "but" so you know what he was thinking does not refer to Demelza.


Susan I'm glad to see this discussion taking place. The Poldark saga is, in my opinion, the best of historical fiction. I've read them more than once and I find something new every time. My favorite of all the scenes written is Ross going to see Elizabeth after she has died. Very powerful.


message 7: by Mara (new) - added it

Mara Conchita wrote: "I don't have a comment but I do have a question. What does this mean...."God, thought Ross, it does work, and how unfairly,"

The "it" that he's talking about when he says, "it does work" refers to his thoughts back in the last two pages of chapter one of book three, at the paragraph that begins with, "After he had left Tholly...

He's about to tell Demelza that he has decided to go on the rescue mission for Dwight.

In that passage we see Ross admitting that he undertakes risk and danger partly because it helps him to appreciate what he has and takes for granted, his home, wife, family & position.

He knows he is being "unfair" because it places Demelza under a strain and his family at risk of destitution should he be injured or die.
Also, he knows that his arguments for taking the risk are weak, so he doesn't tell Demelza this part of his reason for going on the rescue mission. He will only tell her that it's all for Dwight's sake because he knows that for Demelza that will suffice.

So when he returns he IS rewarded with a homecoming that is so intensely satisfying: "all were waiting to welcome him like a conquering hero", "if there's any happiness more complete than this I don't know it".

Yet he feels slightly guilty & ashamed that this extreme happiness should come at such a risk to his family and himself, "you damned fool, and this is your undeserved reward" he says to himself while he's basking in his glory.




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