Catching up on Classics (and lots more!) discussion

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message 1: by Bob, Short Story Classics (new)

Bob | 4912 comments Mod
The books listed below are examples of books written by women covering the decades from 1800-1980. It wasn't overly difficult to compile this list, but the further back you go in time the harder it will be to find an abundance of females authors. I did find books from the 1780's and 1790's, I'm sure there are others.

Any genre is acceptable as long as the book was authored by a woman. This list has a small number of books from the genres of non-fiction, poetry, and children's books. Remember you can integrate this challenge with any other challenge you chose to participate in, such as A-Z Author & Title, Old & New Classics, and Bingo.

1801-Belinda by Maria Edgeworth
1806-Zofloya, or The Moor by Charlotte Dacre
1813-Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen
1818-Frankenstein by Mary Shelley
1823-Lucy Temple: Charlotte's Daughter by Susanna Rowson
1826-Gaston de Blondeville by Ann Radcliffe
1832-Indiana by George Sand (Anantine Aurore Lucile Dupin)
1838-Deerbrook by Harriet Martineau
1847-Jane Eyre by Charlotte Brontë
1847-Wuthering Heights by Emily Brontë
1848-The Tenant of Wildfell Hall by Anne Brontë
1852-Uncle Tom's Cabin by Harriet Beecher Stowe
1853-North and South by Elizabeth Gaskell
1861-Silas Marner by George Eliot (Mary Ann Evans)
1868-Little Women by Louisa May Alcott
1872-Middlemarch by George Eliot (Mary Ann Evans)
1877-Black Beauty by Anna Sewell
1885-Marigold Garden by Kate Greenaway
1889-A New England Girlhood by Lucy Larcom
1892-The Yellow Wall-Paper by Charlotte Perkins Gilman
1899-The Awakening by Kate Chopin
1902-The Story of My Life by Helen Keller
1905-The House of Mirth by Edith Wharton
1918-My Ántonia by Willa Cather
1918-The Return of the Soldier by Rebecca West
1927-To the Lighthouse by Virginia Woolf
1929-Passing by Nella Larsen
1937-Their Eyes Were Watching God by Zora Neale Hurston
1938-The Death of the Heart by Elizabeth Bowen
1940-The Heart is a Lonely Hunter by Carson McCullers
1949-The Second SexSimone de Beauvoir
1954-Nectar in a Sieve by Kamala Markandaya
1957-Atlas Shrugged by Ayn Rand
1962-We Have Always Lived in the Castle by Shirley Jackson
1966-Wide Sargasso Sea by Jean Rhys
1970-The Bluest Eye by Toni Morrison
1972-The Optimist's Daughter by Eudora Welty
1981-Housekeeping by Marilynne Robinson
1982-The Color Purple by Alice Walker


message 2: by Bob, Short Story Classics (new)

Bob | 4912 comments Mod
This list is simply meant to b helpful, there is no requirements as to the books you select as long as they meet the challenge requirements.


message 3: by Maarit (last edited Nov 23, 2015 07:49AM) (new)

Maarit | 285 comments This challenge looks interesting, I think I will take a chance with it and see what I can find. Do we post our lists in the other thread created or will there be a third thread for those? And we can probably use the women authors of our own country to this challenge even if they are not translated into English, right? Also is there a limit for the decades one can use, like are decades 1990-1999 and 2000-2010 too early (though I'm not planning to use them, but just want to verify)?


message 4: by Bob, Short Story Classics (new)

Bob | 4912 comments Mod
Maarit wrote: "This challenge looks interesting, I think I will take a chance with it and see what I can find. Do we post our lists in the other thread created or will there be a third thread for those? And we ca..."


Please post your lists on the main challenge thread 2016 Women's Century Challenge. Keep this thread for discussion.

I stopped listing possible books in the 1980's simply because I think anything newer is not a classic. Yes you can use newer books and authors, but remember any book newer than 1999 will be ineligible for nominations on the New School thread.

As for translation, yes, just because it can't be read in English doesn't mean it should be limited. People in your part of the world may appreciate and discover something new because of your selection.


message 5: by Bob, Short Story Classics (new)

Bob | 4912 comments Mod
Don't forget to select which Level Challenge you are going to attempt.

Challenge Levels


message 6: by Pink (new)

Pink | 6556 comments I'm so looking forward to this challenge Bob, thanks for creating it. I'm probably going to attempt level 1, as I'd like to read books from 1750-1850, or maybe 1780-1880, so this will already be hard enough. Plus I have some more works by favourite authors such as Charlotte Bronte, George Elliot and Elizabeth Gaskell, that I'd like to try. I'll put my thinking cap on!


message 7: by Bob, Short Story Classics (new)

Bob | 4912 comments Mod
Pink wrote: "I'm so looking forward to this challenge Bob, thanks for creating it. I'm probably going to attempt level 1, as I'd like to read books from 1750-1850, or maybe 1780-1880, so this will already be ha..."

Thanks Pink, I hope this challenge is enjoyed. I agree that the 1700's will be difficult. From 1780 forward I found some books, it gets harder as you go back. I wish you luck.


message 8: by Pink (new)

Pink | 6556 comments I've started from the 1770s, as I really wanted to include Evelina. I still have a few gaps, for the decades 1780s, 1810s and 1830s, so if anyone has more suggestions, they'd be much appreciated. It seems like the 1810s is dedicated solely to Austen, which I've been reading this year, I've also read Frankenstein, so that's out too.


message 9: by Bob, Short Story Classics (new)

Bob | 4912 comments Mod
Pink wrote: "I've started from the 1770s, as I really wanted to include Evelina. I still have a few gaps, for the decades 1780s, 1810s and 1830s, so if anyone has more suggestions, they'd be much a..."

Give Maria Edgeworth she has a couple from the 1810's and try George Sand for the 1830's and 40's


message 10: by Pink (new)

Pink | 6556 comments Thanks Bob, I'll take a look


message 11: by Lesserknowngems (new)

Lesserknowngems | 103 comments I've covered five decades 1900-1940's (I am trying for level 2) and would love some tips. I am trying to read across Europe (one book from each country), so if anyone have any tips of european female writer who wrote either between 1950-1955 or before the 1900s where I can get a hand on the book in English I would be ever so grateful. :) I have read some, but there are still a lot to go. Luckely ;) I know that the countries change a lot, but I don't mind that. As long as the region is covered. :)

Pink wrote: "Thanks Bob, I'll take a look"
And Pink, if you still need someone for 1780s check out Sophia Lee or Elizabeth Blower.


message 12: by Desertorum (new)

Desertorum Lesserknowngems wrote: "I've covered five decades 1900-1940's (I am trying for level 2) and would love some tips. I am trying to read across Europe (one book from each country), so if anyone have any tips of european fema..."

Couple female I have come across this year are two nobel prize winners; Selma Lagerlöf from Sweden and Sigrid Undset from Norway. But they are before 1900 and I´m not sure how much of their work is in english.


message 13: by Sam (new)

Sam (aramsamsam) | 309 comments Desertorum, I read Marta Oulie by Sigrid Undset just two weeks ago! It's short, it's available in English, and it was good. But is was published 1907, not before 1900.


message 14: by Desertorum (new)

Desertorum Sam wrote: "Desertorum, I read Marta Oulie by Sigrid Undset just two weeks ago! It's short, it's available in English, and it was good. But is was published 1907, not before 1900."

Okay! I read the Kristin Lavransdatter trilogy and you are right, her works are post 1900! My mistake :)


message 15: by Sam (new)

Sam (aramsamsam) | 309 comments What did you think about Kristin Lavransdatter? I want to read it now, but I guess it is very different from Marta Oulie.


message 16: by Desertorum (new)

Desertorum Sam wrote: "What did you think about Kristin Lavransdatter? I want to read it now, but I guess it is very different from Marta Oulie."

I did like it, but it is long, so in some points I felt it was little slow going but then it picked up again. I felt it was very realistic description of that time (1300), so it was interesting read.


message 17: by Sam (new)

Sam (aramsamsam) | 309 comments More or less what I'd expected. Thanks, Desertorum!


message 18: by Julie (new)

Julie | 643 comments For 1950-1959 I would suggest Karen Blixen one of her most famous novel's (made into an Oscar winning movie in the 1980's) was Babette's Feast, published in 1952


message 19: by Laurie (new)

Laurie | 1630 comments Lesserknowngems wrote: "I've covered five decades 1900-1940's (I am trying for level 2) and would love some tips. I am trying to read across Europe (one book from each country), so if anyone have any tips of european fema..."

I found this author, Marie Correlli, while I was searching last night. It appears that all of her books were published pre-1900s. She was one of the best-selling authors of her time (Victorian England) and I have never heard of her.


message 20: by Sam (new)

Sam (aramsamsam) | 309 comments Thanks to this challenge I discovered a new author too: Auguste Gronen, an Austrian writer who invented the first serial detective in German literature! I'm excited to read her books, she seems to have been very popular and received many prizes. I despiae how women writers like her are forgotten so completely that it is hard to google her.


message 21: by Sarah (new)

Sarah I found two authors, Fanny Burney and Charlotte Lennox that were publishing in the 18th century. I want to read Camilla and The Female Quixote: or, the Adventures of Arabella looks quite fun.

It's interesting to see how much female authors dried up (or were choked to death) in the 1880s and 1890s. A lot of us are going to be reading the same books for those years.


message 22: by Pink (new)

Pink | 6556 comments I just have one decade to go....1810s, this will be easy if I don't finish reading Austen's novels this year, otherwise I'm completely stumped.

Bob, I was going to include something by Maria Edgeworth, but forgot she was my choice for the 1800s with Belinda.

I've found a few new authors I'd like to try too. I'm loving this challenge.


message 23: by Deirdre (new)

Deirdre (deirdrereid) | 10 comments Mary Shelley's Frankenstein was published in 1818, so that's another 1810s option, Pink.


message 24: by Pink (new)

Pink | 6556 comments I love Frankenstein, but I've already read it. However I have managed to sneak in another book by her and one by her Mother!


message 25: by Lesserknowngems (last edited Nov 25, 2015 02:03AM) (new)

Lesserknowngems | 103 comments This is a bit of a vent for me. I have a project of reading across Europe, that is to read a book/play by an author from each of the European countries. I thought the women's centuary challenge would be a fun way to read more female writers from Europe. I am very happy with the writer's I have found so far, but realised that Daphne du Maurier can't count since I have read Rebecca, so while I will be reading her, I need a new book. One of the things I have found out thanks to this challenge is how few of female European writers are translated in to english (I can read the three scandinavian languages as well, but I have found out that it's a better bet to try and find something in english). I find a ton of writers that fit the bill of either 1840 or 1940, but so few of them are translated into english. I know this is partly my fault since I should learn more languages, but I think there is a challange here when female writers aren't translated into languages so people outside their home country can read them. I am confident I will find someone eventually, but boy does this annoy me. Okay, rant over. ^^


message 26: by Desertorum (new)

Desertorum Lesserknowngems wrote: "This is a bit of a vent for me. I have a project of reading across Europe, that is to read a book/play by an author from each of the European countries. I thought the women's centuary challenge wou..."

I´m very interested to hear what you are planning for Finland? :)


message 27: by Lesserknowngems (new)

Lesserknowngems | 103 comments Desertorum wrote: "Lesserknowngems wrote: "This is a bit of a vent for me. I have a project of reading across Europe, that is to read a book/play by an author from each of the European countries. I thought the women'..."

I'm actually finished with Finland. I wrote about two of Tove Jansson mummibooks. One with short stories Det usynlige barnet/Tales from Moominvalley and the other was Trollvinter/Moominland Midwinter. I really loved them. I heard some of the short stories and of course the TV-series when I was a kid, but I never realised how much the books are enjoyable for grown ups as well. ^^


message 28: by Desertorum (new)

Desertorum Lesserknowngems wrote: "Desertorum wrote: "Lesserknowngems wrote: "This is a bit of a vent for me. I have a project of reading across Europe, that is to read a book/play by an author from each of the European countries. I..."

Nice! Last year was Tove´s 100 year celebration year and in Porvoo (where I live and Tove had her Klovharu cabin) there was all kinds of stuff related to that. I read book about her life and also started reading Moomin (muumi) books from the beginning and in right order.


message 29: by Lesserknowngems (new)

Lesserknowngems | 103 comments Desertorum wrote: "Lesserknowngems wrote: "Desertorum wrote: "Lesserknowngems wrote: "This is a bit of a vent for me. I have a project of reading across Europe, that is to read a book/play by an author from each of t..."

How cool. I missed her 100th, but I'm glad she is getting so much recognition. I haven't read a lot about her life, but I did read some since Moominland Midwinter apparently was very connected to her own life, especially her partnership. Is it true that her own personality is split into My and Moomin? Because that really read as someone with a somewhat split personality XD (joke)


message 30: by Desertorum (new)

Desertorum Lesserknowngems wrote: "Desertorum wrote: "Lesserknowngems wrote: "Desertorum wrote: "Lesserknowngems wrote: "This is a bit of a vent for me. I have a project of reading across Europe, that is to read a book/play by an au..."

I think there are lot of connections/inspiration from her life in moomins and I think she referred herself that moomin was her alter ego, but haven´t heard about My being the other part. Maybe they presents her different sides? I don´t know but the book about her; Tove Jansson: Tee työtä ja rakasta was very interesting.


message 31: by Sam (new)

Sam (aramsamsam) | 309 comments @Lesserknowngems: I have the opposite problem. The Austrian author I discovered has been translated and is now better remembered in the english speaking world, it seems.


message 32: by Lesserknowngems (new)

Lesserknowngems | 103 comments Sam wrote: "@Lesserknowngems: I have the opposite problem. The Austrian author I discovered has been translated and is now better remembered in the english speaking world, it seems."

What author is that? And do you mean that the author is not remembered in Austria?


Desertorum wrote: "Lesserknowngems wrote: "Desertorum wrote: "Lesserknowngems wrote: "Desertorum wrote: "Lesserknowngems wrote: "This is a bit of a vent for me. I have a project of reading across Europe, that is to r..."

Thanks for the tips, I'll check it out.


message 33: by Lesserknowngems (new)

Lesserknowngems | 103 comments If you need a tip for a certain decade wikipedia has a wonderful list https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of... Here they write about all the years and you can even go in on a link and get a whole page for that specific year with what books (that the people writing the wikipediapage has noticed) was given out that year. It's not a full list, but it might give some inspiration.


message 34: by Tytti (new)

Tytti | 1092 comments Lesserknowngems wrote: "One of the things I have found out thanks to this challenge is how few of female European writers are translated in to english"

I think this applies to male authors, as well. Maybe not as much, but still. And even though Edward Bulwer-Lytton was a well known and popular author in his time, he is now remembered for only one thing, more or less. "It was a dark and stormy night..."


message 35: by Sam (new)

Sam (aramsamsam) | 309 comments @LESSERKNOWNGEMS
I discovered Auguste Gronen who invented the first serial detective in german lit. She is forgotten in the german speaking world.


message 36: by Lesserknowngems (new)

Lesserknowngems | 103 comments Tytti wrote: "Lesserknowngems wrote: "One of the things I have found out thanks to this challenge is how few of female European writers are translated in to english"

I think this applies to male authors, as wel..."


True. Looking over the lists over things that where published in the given years, I was suprised about how few of them I had actually heard of. Even quite big names in their time. I guess it goes to show that fame is a fickle friends.

Sam wrote: "@LESSERKNOWNGEMS
I discovered Auguste Gronen who invented the first serial detective in german lit. She is forgotten in the german speaking world."


Oh. I didn't know. I first heard about her when organizing this list (and she's actually on it) but I didn't know she was that unkown in the german speaking world. How big is detective lit in Germany? (I ask as if you know)


message 37: by Sam (new)

Sam (aramsamsam) | 309 comments I think crime sells. Always. But not being into crime myself, I cannot tell really. And detective novels are a bit more special. But I think the detective novel as such has changed quite a bit.


Powder River Rose (powderriverrose) | 152 comments I just ordered 500 Great Books By Women by Erica Bauermeister from Amazon for 1 cent + 3.99 in shipping. Okay so $4 but I'd like to pick some authors that we possibly don't hear of all the time. I'll look it over, see what I can find in audiobooks and then make my list. This sounds like a fun challenge for 2016.


message 39: by Sam (new)

Sam (aramsamsam) | 309 comments Powder River Rose wrote: "I just ordered 500 Great Books By Women by Erica Bauermeister from Amazon for 1 cent + 3.99 in shipping. Okay so $4 but I'd like to pick some authors that we possibly..."

Oh, nice. I'm looking forward to seeing your list and ideas!


message 40: by Powder River Rose (last edited Nov 27, 2015 02:07PM) (new)

Powder River Rose (powderriverrose) | 152 comments Sam wrote: "Powder River Rose wrote: "I just ordered 500 Great Books By Women by Erica Bauermeister from Amazon for 1 cent + 3.99 in shipping. Okay so $4 but I'd like to pick som..."

Thanks Sam, I'm looking forward to seeing what the book has to offer up. Since I also need to find each book in audio format it may be more difficult than I imagine but it will be fun to search.


message 41: by Lesserknowngems (new)

Lesserknowngems | 103 comments Sam wrote: "I think crime sells. Always. But not being into crime myself, I cannot tell really. And detective novels are a bit more special. But I think the detective novel as such has changed quite a bit."

Now I'm intrigued and Gronen is moved up the list.

Powder River Rose wrote: "Sam wrote: "Powder River Rose wrote: "I just ordered 500 Great Books By Women by Erica Bauermeister from Amazon for 1 cent + 3.99 in shipping. Okay so $4 but I'd like..."

You probably know, but personally I've found librivox and other podcasts you can find on itunes for free quite helpful when searching for audiobooks.


message 42: by Bob, Short Story Classics (new)

Bob | 4912 comments Mod
Looking to substitute my 1890's choice of The Awakening, so I can read it now in December. I'm looking for feed-back on these three:

Gösta Berling's Saga by Selma Lagerlöf, 1891

Some Experiences of an Irish R.M. by Edith Somerville, 1899

The Library Window by Margaret Oliphant, 1896

or any other options that anyone may have.


message 43: by Pink (new)

Pink | 6556 comments Sorry Bob, I haven't read any of those, so can't help you. The only other suggestion I have is The Yellow Wallpaper, but I think you've read that one already.


message 44: by Amanda (new)

Amanda (tnbooklover) | 19 comments I haven't read any of them either but The Library Window looks very interesting.


message 45: by Julie (last edited Dec 03, 2015 02:08AM) (new)

Julie | 643 comments Bob wrote: "Looking to substitute my 1890's choice of The Awakening, so I can read it now in December. I'm looking for feed-back on these three:


The only one I've heard off is Gösta Berling's Saga - haven't read it myself, but it is considered a Nordic Classic (I have read The Wonderful Adventures of Nils - a childrens classic, which I loved)


message 46: by Kathleen (last edited Dec 08, 2015 04:45PM) (new)

Kathleen | 3795 comments Bob wrote: "Looking to substitute my 1890's choice of The Awakening, so I can read it now in December. I'm looking for feed-back on these three:"

I don't know those but I was going to suggest Elizabeth and Her German Garden by Elizabeth Von Arnim, 1898, that I've been wanting to read.

I also found two other interesting ones: Beautiful Joe by Margaret Marshall Saunders, if you like dogs, 1893, and The Country of the Pointed Firs Sarah Orne Jewett, 1896, about the coast of Maine.

I can't attest to any of these--just sounded good!


Powder River Rose (powderriverrose) | 152 comments Sam wrote: "Powder River Rose wrote: "I just ordered 500 Great Books By Women by Erica Bauermeister from Amazon for 1 cent + 3.99 in shipping. Okay so $4 but I'd like to pick som..."

Well the book arrived but I'm rather disappointed in it. Most of the books listed were published in the 1980's and 90's. Very few are pre-1900 and of those most are rather obscure titles not available in audio (there's only two given from the Bronte sisters); of those published from 1900-1950 nearly every one has been listed for the challenge. Since I'm having trouble finding the time to search out consecutive titles, I will see if any of those mentioned on this thread come in audio and create my list from them. I appreciate that you have the list available to us and all the efforts others have gone to in finding books.


message 48: by Powder River Rose (last edited Dec 12, 2015 08:56PM) (new)

Powder River Rose (powderriverrose) | 152 comments Lesserknowngems wrote: You probably know.....

Yes, I really like LibriVox and in fact found a travel journal from 1850-something and a couple others that I believe I will enjoy. The podcasts I listen to are great history or science lessons...Stuff You Missed In History Class, Science Friday and radio broadcasts that people have told me about on Old Time Radio Mystery Theater. Thank you for your thoughts....great minds think alike. ;)


message 49: by Lesserknowngems (new)

Lesserknowngems | 103 comments Powder River Rose wrote: "Lesserknowngems wrote: You probably know.....

Yes, I really like LibriVox and in fact found a travel journal from 1850-something and a couple others that I believe I will enjoy. The podcasts I lis..."


I was wondering because I know there are a lot of audiobooks that are under podcasts. So you can search for a particular book or author and sometimes there will be audiobooks in the podcastsection. And too bad about the book. Most women didn't get recognised even if they produced works of fiction earlier on, but it's no fun when there isn't much new to the book and it isn't more varied.

http://digital.library.upenn.edu/women/

Link to database for female writers. Search by country, century, etnicithy etc.


Powder River Rose (powderriverrose) | 152 comments Lesserknowngems wrote: "Powder River Rose wrote: "Lesserknowngems wrote: You probably know.....

Yes, I really like LibriVox and in fact found a travel journal from 1850-something and a couple others that I believe I will..."


I'm sorry I didn't see your reply sooner. Thank you for the database link on female writers. Over the next couple weeks I hope to have my challenges mapped out so I can post them and see how well I stay on track. This is a different way of finding books for reading and I believe I will enjoy it immensely.


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