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Book Chat > Bailey's Women's Prize for Fiction

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message 1: by LindaJ^ (new)

LindaJ^ (lindajs) | 1989 comments On March 7, 2014 the longlist for the 2014 Bailey's Women's Prize for Fiction (formerly the Orange Prize) were announed. http://www.womensprizeforfiction.co.u...

There are 20 books on the list, a number of which have appeared on other prize lists in the recent past. The prize was first awarded in 1996. At least 4 of the authors have been on previous short lists (5 books) for this prize - Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Margaret Atwood, Elizabeth Strout, and Donna Tartt.

The longlist books are:
Americanah by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie
MaddAddam by Margaret Atwood
The Dogs of Littlefield by Suzanne Berne
The Shadow of the Crescent Moon by Fatima Bhutto
The Bear by Claire Cameron
Eleven Days by Lea Carpenter
The Strangler Vine by M.J. Carter
The Luminaries by Eleanor Catton
Reasons She Goes to the Woods by Deborah Kay Davies
Burial Rites by Hannah Kent
The Flamethrowers by Rachel Kushner
The Lowland by Jhumpa Lahiri
The Undertaking by Audrey Magee
A Girl Is a Half-formed Thing by Eimear McBride
Almost English by Charlotte Mendelson
Still Life with Bread Crumbs by Anna Quindlen
The Burgess Boys by Elizabeth Strout
The Goldfinch by Donna Tartt
All the Birds, Singing bu Evie Wyld


message 2: by Jen (new)

Jen | 63 comments I was really excited for this list. I'm planning to tackle 5-6 of these in the coming months. Does anyone know when the short list comes out? I couldn't find a date.


message 3: by LindaJ^ (new)

LindaJ^ (lindajs) | 1989 comments Six finalists will be announced on April 7, and the winner of the prize will be revealed on June 4.


message 4: by Lily (new)

Lily (joy1) | 2404 comments Thanks much, Linda. I shared with my f2f book club last night and we touched upon it today.

Here is a good table of previous winners and short lists: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_...


message 5: by LindaJ^ (new)

LindaJ^ (lindajs) | 1989 comments Thanks for the chart Lily! Some of the non-winners are, I think, classics, making me think I have to read the winner. E.g., The Poisonwood Bible by Barbara Kingsolver, which is in my top five ever books!


message 6: by Jen (new)

Jen | 63 comments Linda wrote: "Six finalists will be announced on April 7, and the winner of the prize will be revealed on June 4."

Thanks Linda!


Jenny (Reading Envy) (readingenvy) Linda wrote: "Here is the shortlist, announced yesterday"

Without having read them all, Adichie is my pick to win. I can't even get the McBride or Magee in the USA until fall (too late, this always happens!)


message 9: by Esther (last edited Apr 09, 2014 05:36PM) (new)

Esther  (estame) | 1 comments I loved Burial Rites last year, the story has stayed with me ever since. I am currently reading The Undertaking, which is notable for it's heavy use of dialogue; it almost reads like a play in places. I am "enjoying" looking at the war from a Nazi Germans perspective, the characters are all fairly unlikeable, but I can handle that.

I have the rest lined up to read consecutively. I'm starting A Girl is a Half-Formed Thing next - I can't wait because I've heard really good things.


message 10: by LindaJ^ (new)

LindaJ^ (lindajs) | 1989 comments Jenny (Reading Envy) wrote: "Linda wrote: "Here is the shortlist, announced yesterday"

Without having read them all, Adichie is my pick to win. I can't even get the McBride or Magee in the USA until fall (too late, this alway..."


I was able to get the UK editions using Abebooks, at a price less than Amazon will be selling them when the US editions are published.


message 11: by Jayme (new)

Jayme EstaAmeliaR wrote: "I loved Burial Rites last year, the story has stayed with me ever since. I am currently reading The Undertaking, which is notable for it's heavy use of dialogue; it almost reads like a play in plac..."

Loved Burial Rights, too. One of my favorites from last year.


message 12: by Lily (last edited Apr 12, 2014 08:50PM) (new)

Lily (joy1) | 2404 comments Jayme wrote: "EstaAmeliaR wrote: 'I loved Burial Rites last year, the story has stayed with me ever since....'

Loved Burial Rights, too. One of my favorites from last year..."


WOW! Have had Burial Rites by Hannah Kent on my Kindle since Amazon offered a special several months ago. Started it last night, could not let go of it today once necessary meetings and errands were out of the way. Probably won't be my favorite of 2014, but will rank among the best. Based on a real 19th century murder trial in Iceland, where the author, an Aussie, had learned of the story as an exchange student in her teenage years. Adichie's novel may be better written by several measurements, but I would not be disappointed if Kent took the Bailey this year.


message 13: by Lily (new)

Lily (joy1) | 2404 comments @Msg3 Looking forward to the announcement tomorrow (6/4)!


message 15: by Lily (new)

Lily (joy1) | 2404 comments Announcement from Bailey's:

This Book Campaign
http://www.womensprizeforfiction.co.u...


message 16: by Lily (last edited Jul 29, 2014 06:41PM) (new)

Lily (joy1) | 2404 comments More on Bailey's ThisBook Campaign:

"Back in May 2014, the Baileys Women’s Prize for Fiction launched the #ThisBook campaign. The aim was simple: to find out which books, written by women, have had the biggest impact on readers.

"We enlisted nineteen inspirational women – from Dawn O’Porter to Jennifer Saunders, Sandi Toksvig to Joanna Trollope – to launch the campaign and tell us about the books that most impacted, shaped or changed their lives.

"The reasons for their choices varied greatly – while Kate Mosse attributes Wuthering Heights by Emily Brontë to kick-starting her writing career, for Edith Bowman, The Lovely Bones by Alice Sebold helped her deal with a personal loss. Saffron Burrows said that I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings by Maya Angelou made her fall in love with storytelling, while Zawe Ashton’s experience of The Bluest Eye by Toni Morrison made her truly understand just how books can really change you.

"Following the launch, we took to Twitter to ask the general public to share their submissions and we were overwhelmed with the response. Thousands used the #ThisBook hashtag to take part and nominate the book that changed their life, and the final top twenty list, revealed today, features a diverse and eclectic mix of literary greats.

"Harper Lee’s timeless classic To Kill a Mockingbird took the top spot as the most influential book written by a woman, with Margaret Atwood’s dystopian fiction The Handmaid's Tale and Charlotte Brontë’s Jane Eyre taking second and third place respectively.

"Interestingly, nearly half of the top 20 books, as nominated by the public, were published before 1960, including Louisa May Alcott’s Little Women (8th place) and Middlemarch (16th place) by George Eliot – confirming that classic novels continue to inspire readers today.

The full #ThisBook top 20 is as follows:

1. To Kill a Mockingbird Harper Lee
2. The Handmaid's Tale Margaret Atwood
3. Jane Eyre Charlotte Brontë
4. Harry Potter J.K. Rowling
5. Wuthering Heights Emily Brontë
6. Pride and Prejudice Jane Austen
7. Rebecca Daphne du Maurier
8. Little Women Louisa May Alcott
9. The Secret History Donna Tartt
10. I Capture the Castle Dodie Smith
11. The Bell Jar Sylvia Plath
12. Beloved Toni Morrison
13. Gone with the Wind Margaret Mitchell
14. We Need to Talk About Kevin Lionel Shriver
15. The Time Traveler's Wife Audrey Niffenegger
16. Middlemarch George Eliot
17. I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings Maya Angelou
18. The Golden Notebook Doris Lessing
19. The Colour Purple Alice Walker
20. The Women's Room Marilyn French


"Shami Chakrabarti, Director of Liberty and announced today as Chair of the Baileys Women’s Prize for Fiction 2015 judging panel, took part in the campaign launch in May and selected To Kill a Mockingbird as her #ThisBook. She comments, 'With human rights under attack the world over, the enduring appeal of Harper Lee’s great tale gives hope that justice and equality might yet triumph over prejudice.'


"Keep an eye on our Facebook and Twitter pages for the chance to win a complete set of the #ThisBook top 20."

http://www.womensprizeforfiction.co.u...


message 17: by Lily (last edited Nov 29, 2014 04:58AM) (new)

Lily (joy1) | 2404 comments Received this rather blustery announcement re: the judges for the 2015 Baileys Women's Prize for Fiction:

"We’re delighted to introduce the judging panel for the 2015 Baileys Women’s Prize for Fiction. The panel - which includes some of the most esteemed women from the worlds of writing, campaigning, broadcasting and journalism - will be chaired by the Director of Liberty - and author of the bestselling On Liberty - Shami Chakrabarti. Her fellow judges are writer and founder of The Everyday Sexism Project ( Everyday Sexism ), Laura Bates; the broadcaster, writer and columnist for ES Magazine, Grace Dent; the award-winning novelist and poet (and winner of the first ever Women’s Prize for Fiction in 1996 -- A Spell of Winter ), Helen Dunmore; and Channel 4 News presenter, Cathy Newman.

"Shami Chakrabarti says of chairing this year’s panel: 'Women writers continue to enthrall, educate and entertain so to chair the judges of the Baileys Women’s Prize for Fiction is going to be great reading and great fun.'"

(Links and some book names added.)

Previous winners: http://www.womensprizeforfiction.co.u...


message 18: by Lily (new)

Lily (joy1) | 2404 comments 2015 Baileys Women’s Prize for Fiction

Newsletter today (3/9/15) announcing long list for the 2015 Baileys Women’s Prize for Fiction:

"The Baileys Women’s Prize for Fiction - the UK’s only annual book award for fiction written by a woman - is delighted to announce the 2015 longlist." [See next post for the list.]

"The Prize celebrates excellence, originality and accessibility in writing from women from across the globe and is awarded for the best novel of the year written by a woman.

"This year’s longlist showcases both rising stars of literature and well-established writers, and features five debut writers as well as six previously shortlisted authors.

"The five judges - writer and founder of The Everyday Sexism Project, Laura Bates; the broadcaster, writer and columnist for ES Magazine, Grace Dent; the award-winning poet and novelist (and winner of the first ever Women’s Prize for Fiction in 1996) Helen Dunmore; Channel 4 News presenter, Cathy Newman and Chair, Director of Liberty, Shami Chakrabarti, have been busy reading over the last few months. They had the unenviable task of narrowing 165 books down to just twenty in a bid to bring you the best of this year’s international female fiction." [See previous post for Goodreads links for the judges.]

"This year’s Chair of Judges, Shami Chakrabarti says:

"'The Prize's 20th year is a particularly strong one for women's fiction. All judges fought hard for their favourites and the result is a 2015 list of 20 to be proud of - with its mix of genres and styles, first-timers and well-known names from around the world.'

"She added: 'There is a very strong showing of UK writers and we are all incredibly excited about the final stages of the search for the winner.'

"The judges next job is to whittle these twenty titles down to a shortlist of six titles – to be announced on Monday 13th April 2015.

"The winner of the Baileys Women’s Prize for Fiction 2015, who will be announced at an awards ceremony in central London on June 3rd, will receive a cheque for £30,000 and a limited edition bronze award known as a ‘Bessie’ – both are anonymously endowed.

We’ll be giving away copies of the 20 longlisted books on our social channels. To be in with a chance of winning, please visit our Facebook and Twitter pages where daily competitions will be running between now and the shortlist announcement on April 13th.

"For more information on this year’s twenty longlisted books and authors, please visit our website."


message 20: by Dree (new)

Dree | 15 comments Wow I have only read 2 of those books, but both got 5 stars from me. I read 80 books last year and gave 6 4 stars.


message 21: by Jen (new)

Jen | 63 comments Dree wrote: "Wow I have only read 2 of those books, but both got 5 stars from me. I read 80 books last year and gave 6 4 stars."

Which ones, Dree?


message 22: by Jen (new)

Jen | 63 comments Thank you for posting, Lily! I have a lot of reading to do.


message 23: by Violet (new)

Violet wells | 351 comments Anyone read Crooked Heart? I'm reading Their Finest Hour and a Half by Lissa Evans and it's a little gem of a novel.


message 24: by Lacewing (last edited Mar 10, 2015 08:17AM) (new)

Lacewing Outline by Rachel Cusk is on my list. The GR reviews are all over the map, and not infrequently that's a clue a book has depth.

Via some random impulse, I bought The Country of Ice Cream Star. Got about 75% through it -- there are linguistic notions of special interest to me -- but then I stalled. The plot is yet another hero's journey.

I would likely enjoy Anne Tyler's latest, but not for moment.

Very much looking forward to our discussion of Station Eleven.

I'll continue How to be both eventually; George's part I liked, but the next part was so abruptly different, I sort of choked.

Per reviews, Sarah Waters' latest does not appeal. Very disappointing as I've enjoyed others she's written.

The Bees, I suspect, is too politically overt for my tastes.

Nobody Is Ever Missing by Catherine Lacey is the most stunning book by a woman I've ever read. And it's not on this list . . .


message 25: by Violet (new)

Violet wells | 351 comments I really like Rachel Cusk. Haven't read this one though. Glad you're going to be joining us for Station Eleven. We've missed your insights on the Euphoria discussion.


message 26: by Lacewing (new)

Lacewing Euphoria didn't appeal, Violet. We'll see you on the St. Eleven discussion. Bring us what you got to bring.


message 27: by Charlotte (new)

Charlotte Thank you so much for posting this year's list. The value of literary prizes is slightly problematic for me but I do have a soft spot for the Orange/Bailey's - at least seeing what I have read already!

I have read only Station Eleven and The Bees this year - both were great.

Anne Tyler is actually a new author for me (don't ask how I have missed her!) but I loved A Patchwork Planet so would be very interested in reading this offering. I Am China looks like my kind of novel so that's on the TBR list now! Ice Cream Star and The Offering are the others that I have immediately liked the look of - I suspect more will be added to the ever-growing TBR list as I look further into the longlist!


message 28: by Lacewing (last edited Mar 10, 2015 08:32AM) (new)

Lacewing Adding: I recently read All The Birds, Singing and was left flat. Need to ferret out some reviews which may provide clues about what I may have missed.


message 29: by Lily (last edited Mar 10, 2015 10:38AM) (new)

Lily (joy1) | 2404 comments Charlotte wrote: "Anne Tyler is actually a new author for me (don't ask how I have missed her!) but I loved A Patchwork Planet so would be very interested in reading this offering...."

I much appreciated Back When We Were Grownups, called to my attention a few months (or was it a year or two) after I became a widow. As the critics say, Ann can veer to the sentimental, but I have usually found an appealing underlying "goodness" in her characters and stories, although I've not read a lot of her considerable oeuvre.

Her Wikipedia entry seems to be unusually full of comments on the background and reception of her work, including her self judgment: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anne_Tyler


message 30: by Lily (last edited Mar 10, 2015 10:45AM) (new)

Lily (joy1) | 2404 comments Charlotte wrote: "Thank you so much for posting this year's list. The value of literary prizes is slightly problematic for me but I do have a soft spot for the Orange/Bailey's - at least seeing what I have read alre..."

Charlotte -- If you are willing to share, I'm curious as to the ways the value of literary prizes is "slightly problematic" to you.

As guides to selecting my own reading choices, they certainly are for me, problematic, that is. I am aware that they can be sources of both remuneration and merchandising for authors, publishers and book sellers. As I have been increasing my awareness of their existence and diversity over the past couple of years (book fairs and author acquaintances have helped), I am becoming increasingly sensitive to the backgrounds of their judges (see @17) and the criteria for book selection. Some of those may not match my reading interests. On the other hand, they can be useful filters for selection, whether of a book itself or of authors previously overlooked or unknown. One of my perhaps off-beat questions is whether readers like those of us on Goodreads should or can influence these awards to be more valuable for book selection.

Having posted these here, I find the comments and experiences with these books, authors, and prizes to be rewarding responses. Thank you to all who have shared.


message 31: by Jane from B.C. (last edited Mar 10, 2015 01:44PM) (new)

Jane from B.C. (janethebookworm) | 63 comments I have read two of these : "How to be Both" (4-stars) and "The Girl Who Was Saturday Night" (3-stars).

Sitting on my Kindle are: "The Paying Guest"; "Station Eleven" (which I hope to read along with the group in April), "The Bees" and "A Spool of Blue Thread".


message 32: by Charlotte (new)

Charlotte I actually love reading from prize long- and shortlists, which is why it is problematic. It is a total guilty pleasure, as I had the (mis)fortune to study and write on literary prizes which makes me rather cynical!

I have rewritten this comment twice now as I start to get carried away into a rather deep essay, so I will try and just outline the main reasons in note form.

1. Publishers putting forward the novels for selection
2. Old boy network of judges (eg Nobel Prize appointments)
3. Steering of reading public to purchase in a particular direction (are we benefiting? also books bought doesn't equal books read)
4. Corporate sponsorship rising with decrease in arts funding (can there be a wrong winner? Booker McConnell and race issues)
5. Vague criteria for actual winner eg 'The best'
6. Over-saturation of arts prizes in general (can something be seen by society as successful without a prize being awarded?)

Obviously these are just bullet points and differ from prize to prize rather a lot.


message 33: by Lily (new)

Lily (joy1) | 2404 comments Charlotte wrote: "I actually love reading from prize long- and shortlists, which is why it is problematic. It is a total guilty pleasure, as I had the (mis)fortune to study and write on literary prizes which makes m..."

Thanks for the sharing, Charlotte. I didn't intend to usurp the amount of time that probably took to create. Just as it is probably useful for us to consider the roles and uses and demands of reading beyond entertainment, I do think it is helpful to think a bit deeper, at least occasionally, about the methods and tools we use to select what we read.

I have always cottoned to Mark Twain's "Don't read good books. There isn't time for that; read only the best." But, I also know, after a lifetime of being an avid reader, sometimes the "best" may be "trash" another day, or, at least, sub-par time usage.


message 34: by Lily (last edited Apr 15, 2015 09:15PM) (new)

Lily (joy1) | 2404 comments Monday, April 13, 2015

Baileys Women's Prize for Fiction Announce 2015 Shortlist

The Baileys Women’s Prize for Fiction - the UK’s only annual book award for fiction written by a woman - is delighted to announce the 2015 shortlist.

This year’s six shortlisted books were whittled down from a 20-strong longlist, which can be found on our website. This year’s selection includes five previously shortlisted authors and one debut novelist.

The five judges: writer and founder of The Everyday Sexism Project Laura Bates, columnist and broadcaster, Grace Dent, novelist and poet Helen Dunmore, Channel 4 presenter, Grace DentCathy Newman, and Chair judge, Director of Liberty, Shami Chakrabarti, have been busy reading the 20 longlisted books over the last few weeks.

Having chosen 20 books from the original 160 that were submitted, the judges then had the unenviable task of narrowing the entries down to just six in a bid to bring you the very best of this year’s international female fiction.

This year’s Chair of judges, Shami Chakrabarti, says of the shortlist, “You've heard of fantasy football? Well, short-listing for the 2015 Baileys Prize was the fantasy book club of a lifetime.”

“The novels we shared and the shortlist we ultimately honour form a body of great women’s writing to entertain and inspire for many years to come."
The judges’ next job is to choose a winner from the shortlist, which will be announced at an awards ceremony in central London on Wednesday 3rd June 2015.

The winner of the Baileys Women’s Prize for Fiction 2015 will receive a cheque for £30,000 and a limited edition bronze award known as a ‘Bessie’ – both are anonymously endowed.

Want to get involved in the 2015 Baileys Women’s Prize for Fiction? Don’t miss this year’s Baileys Prize Southbank Centre events!

On Monday, June 1st to celebrate the incredible power of books, a panel of high profile, creative and inspirational women including Shami Chakrabarti and Grace Dent will come together to discuss the novels, written by women, that have had the most influence on their careers and lives. The panel will share personal stories and anecdotes about the books they love with Chair, Kate Mosse, bestselling author and Co-Founder of the Women’s Prize for Fiction. The event will include a Q&A.

On the eve of this year’s winner’s announcement, Tuesday 2nd June, join us for the incredibly popular Baileys Women’s Prize shortlist readings at Southbank Centre’s Queen Elizabeth Hall in central London. The event, chaired by Shami Chakrabarti, will see the shortlisted authors reading and discussing their work.

For more information and tickets, go to the Southbank Centre's website.

Or get involved by joining the conversation @BaileysPrize using #3wordreview and share your three word reviews of this year’s shortlisted books.

For a chance to win a set of the shortlisted books and to keep up to date with all the latest news from the Baileys Women’s Prize for Fiction, please visit our Facebook and Twitter pages.

For more information on this year’s shortlisted books and authors, please visit our website.

2015 short list: http://www.womensprizeforfiction.co.u...


message 35: by Lily (last edited Jun 03, 2015 12:41PM) (new)


message 36: by LindaJ^ (new)

LindaJ^ (lindajs) | 1989 comments The Bees is available in Kindle version on Amazon for $1.99 -- http://www.amazon.com/Bees-Novel-Lali....


Kirsten #daisyday #nationalkazooday #internationallegoday (kmcripn) The Bees is incredible! One of my very favorite books that I read last year!!


message 38: by Lily (new)

Lily (joy1) | 2404 comments "And without further ado, we're delighted to announce Ali Smith has won the 2015 Baileys Women's Prize for Fiction!"

https://twitter.com/BaileysPrize/stat...

Live stream (~50 min) is or will be available here:
http://www.womensprizeforfiction.co.u...

How to be both by Ali Smith How to be both by Ali Smith Ali Smith


message 39: by Lark (new)

Lark Benobi (larkbenobi) | 298 comments Thanks for posting the news, Lily! Wonderful! I loved this book, and winning the Bailey's is likely to persuade many other readers to give it a try.


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