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The Picture-Book Club > September 2015: Rainforests (Discuss Our Club Reads Here)

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message 2: by Kathryn, The Princess of Picture-Books (new)

Kathryn | 5767 comments Mod
I'm able to get all of them except The Living Rain Forest: An Animal Alphabet and Garden of the Spirit Bear: Life in the Great Northern Rainforest. Looking forward to others sharing their reviews of those.

I read Where the Forest Meets the Sea a few years ago when I was on a Jeannie Baker kick and I enjoyed it though not as much as her book Home. I'm not sure I will read it again this month but here's my existing review:
This is a beautiful book! Baker's collage art is amazing. I really enjoyed how the little boy thinks back to all the things that the tropical forest (in North Queensland, Australia) has seen over the years, like dinosaurs roaming and aboriginal children playing in the huge trees. And I certainly appreciate the message of wanting to preserve the forest because it becomes but a distant memory itself. I'm just not sure I felt as moved as I ought to have been, given all of this. Still, it's definitely a worthwhile read if you're a fan of Baker's work and/or looking for a book on modern Australia that doesn't focus on kangaroos and koalas!


message 3: by SamZ (new)

SamZ (samwisezbrown) | 220 comments A North American Rain Forest Scrapbook by Virginia Wright-Frierson I really enjoyed this introduction to the temperate rain forests. I am glad that this was included in our study this month, because I think when people say "rain forest" they automatically think of South America. I loved that this story was full of useful information that kids of all ages would like, without being overwhelming. I also really enjoyed the message of preservation and conservation that was included without being too heavy-handed. Great intro for anyone who is looking for a good resource for temperate rain forests in general and the Oregon peninsula rain forest in particular.
Also: that guy licked a banana slug! No way could you get me to do that... blech!


message 4: by Manybooks (last edited Aug 31, 2015 06:37PM) (new)

Manybooks | 7228 comments Mod
Sam wrote: "A North American Rain Forest Scrapbook by Virginia Wright-Frierson I really enjoyed this introduction to the temperate rain forests. I am glad that this was included in our study this month, because I thin..."

I think sometimes, we tend to forget that there are also temperate rain forests, that they also are an important ecological treasure, and that they also need protection (same with rain forests in Asia and Australia).

And it seems that even some of the books that deal with South American rain forests seem to portray an attitude of superiority of the same. I am just reading one of other choices for this month, The Most Beautiful Roof in the World: Exploring the Rainforest Canopy, and while I am finding the narrative interesting and informative, I certainly do NOT like the fact that the author makes a point of stating that temperate rain forests have less species of plants and animals than tropical rain forests (though this was probably not Kathryn Lasky's intention, the wording does seem to almost claim that temperate rain forests are not as essential, not as vital, not as interesting as tropical rain forests and thus, not as worth of protection and conservation).


message 5: by Beverly, Miscellaneous Club host (new)

Beverly (bjbixlerhotmailcom) | 2333 comments Mod
The Living Rain Forest:
I thought this book had fascinating, howbeit, brief information and gorgeous paintings of the various animals. Here is my review:
Kratter has selected a variety of rain forest dwelling animals--mammals, reptiles, birds, fish, insects--to describe. These animals live in many areas of the world, from South America to Australia. Each animal is painted in watercolors and acrylics, and placed in a square on the page, with its popular name, its scientific name, and its size underneath the illustration. The paintings are very beautiful, the animals look realistic, and many of them are quite colorful. On the facing page is a brief description of the animal, and definitions of one or two scientific terms that were in the description. This is a fascinating book that can be shared with pre-school children and elementary school students.


message 6: by Beverly, Miscellaneous Club host (new)

Beverly (bjbixlerhotmailcom) | 2333 comments Mod
Where the Forest Meets the Sea:
I also read this book years ago when it first came out, but it was good to revisit it. It is beautiful. Here is my review:
This is a beautiful book, with a young boy exploring and communing with the Daintree Rainforest in North Queensland, Australia. Baker's relief collages are painstakingly detailed, down to the hair on the father's chest, legs, and arms. She used a variety of materials in her collages, including modeling clay, papers, textured materials, preserved natural materials (like leaves), and paints. Although not a "Where's Waldo" type book, one can find various things "hiding" in the pictures: a snake here, a bird there, an Aboriginal child in a tree, etc. In addition, the final double-page spread is a double-exposure, with modern-day buildings, etc. ghosted over the beach and rain forest scene. A great book to share with pre-school children and primary grade students.


message 7: by Cheryl is busier irl atm., Newbery Club host (new)

Cheryl is busier irl atm. (cherylllr) | 6248 comments Mod
Where the Forest Meets the Sea isn't my favorite by Jeannie Baker but (here's my review from a couple years ago):

I'm keeping this one. I love the craftsmanship that reveals scenes from the child's imagination overlaid on the collages to make the whole look both real and beautiful. And I appreciate that there aren't too many words, but that the author did, somewhat, let the pictures tell the story.

... and, yes, I did like the 'ghosted' hidden images. I wonder, Beverly, if everyone sees them. I know some readers (nobody in this group I'm sure, though) do read picture-books too fast....


message 8: by Cheryl is busier irl atm., Newbery Club host (new)

Cheryl is busier irl atm. (cherylllr) | 6248 comments Mod
I too really enjoyed A North American Rain Forest Scrapbook. Important, educational, *and* engaging & well-illustrated; what more can one ask from a non-fiction picture-book?


message 9: by Cheryl is busier irl atm., Newbery Club host (last edited Sep 07, 2015 07:58AM) (new)

Cheryl is busier irl atm. (cherylllr) | 6248 comments Mod
The Most Beautiful Roof in the World: Exploring the Rainforest Canopy is absolutely terrific... for older children and for adults. It's much too long to straight read to toddlers. Otoh, there are lots of pictures. And I loved that it was told from the perspective of a mom scientist who takes her sons with her, and they have responsibilities and make discoveries, too! Thorough, engaging, probably best for about 5th grade.

The scientist, Meg Lowman, "believes that science is the machinery that runs the earth." The text explains that she means this in the sense of wondering "How many species can be removed before it will break?"

Meg divides her time between the rainforest floor, the canopy, and her lab back in the US. She works very hard, as an attentive reader can see she must, in the appr. 5 days/month she's in the canopy. She must, because all this adventuring costs a fair bit of money and time. Ok, not as much money as a linear accelerator or fMRIs on a lab full of rhesus monkeys, but, for example, when she was working in Cameroon she viewed the canopy from a raft hung from a dirigible!

Anyway, an example of the hard work that impressed my 19 yo son was that "Meg begins taking 'snapshots' of leaf-eating activity. Last month she had marked every leaf on several branches with a number She now checks to see how much of each leaf has been eaten." Back at camp, after the boys are asleep (after reading Treasure Island toegether) she traces some of the leaves onto graph paper to be as precise as possible. Science is adventure *and* thorough, meticulous record-keeping.

On a little after-dinner walk son James notices a web moving. Meg says it's the breeze. James isn't convinced, and then they realize "the spider is winching in its own web by pulling on a line. Then... the web springs back, and at its trembling center is a small insect.... Meg is astounded. Never before had she seen or even heard of such a spider." (Unfortunately I'm unable to find confirmation that this was new to science and whether the boys got credit/naming rights.)


message 10: by Manybooks (new)

Manybooks | 7228 comments Mod
Cheryl wrote: "The Most Beautiful Roof in the World: Exploring the Rainforest Canopy is absolutely terrific... for older children and for adults. It's much too long to straight read to toddlers. O..."

I really did not like that she immediately killed and preserved the spider. I know that as a scientist, preserving specimens is important, but it still kind of bothered me a bit (but not as much as the information about Audobon and his penchant for killing birds, only so he could paint them bothered me, I think I will never feel the same about him and his bird illustrations again especially considering that according to Lasky, he shot very large quantities of birds, and just to use them as models). Thankfully, Bowman does not engage in similar tactics, but I did wonder a bit why she immediately have to collect a spider sample, why she did not attempt to record the spider with a digital camera or the like instead.


message 11: by Cheryl is busier irl atm., Newbery Club host (new)

Cheryl is busier irl atm. (cherylllr) | 6248 comments Mod
Well, her sons asked her about killing the spider, too, and she did explain it to them, and to my satisfaction. After all, what an animal looks like and what it does is only part of what we need to know about it to fully understand it. Dissection and, now, DNA analysis, are among the other tools that often reveal surprises.

Yeah, too bad about Audubon, but he was actually rather conservative given the context of the times. An exhibit of his work came to the art museum in Reno a few years ago and it was enlightening - I wish I remember more details but I do remember that the point was made that he loved the wildness of the wilderness and wanted to preserve it.


message 12: by Cheryl is busier irl atm., Newbery Club host (new)

Cheryl is busier irl atm. (cherylllr) | 6248 comments Mod
The Rainforest Grew All Around is more accessible to younger children. There's enough information to satisfy schoolchildren, but a tot would love to look at the pictures and hear her parent singing the song to her. And the recipe looks delicious, while making the point that we need to preserve diverse ecosystems.


message 13: by Kathryn, The Princess of Picture-Books (last edited Sep 09, 2015 07:36AM) (new)

Kathryn | 5767 comments Mod
Cheryl wrote: "The Rainforest Grew All Around is more accessible to younger children. There's enough information to satisfy schoolchildren, but a tot would love to look at the pictures and hear he..."

Yes! This is the only one so far that I've been able to share extensively with my two-year-old. He loves the vibrant illustrations and the story-song. I appreciate that the main text is so accessible for younger children but adults can supplement with the side-bar details if children have questions.

I was a little surprised that the recipe section didn't mention about choosing responsibly harvested products, but maybe that wasn't quite so well-known when this book came out some years ago. OTOH, I liked that this wasn't a hit-you-over-the-head message book and simply leaving the question about "what would happen if we didn't have rainforests" could be a great springboard for discussion.

(Waiting for some "me time" to read the other, longer, books. Sorry, I keep hoping we will read PBs that I can share with my son but we keep choosing these beautiful books for older readers, which is good, too, just takes me longer to get to them. Hoping to get to it soon!!!)


message 14: by Cheryl is busier irl atm., Newbery Club host (new)

Cheryl is busier irl atm. (cherylllr) | 6248 comments Mod
The Living Rain Forest is intriguing. It includes examples of tropical rainforests around the world, but no mention of temperate ones. The blurbs that tell about each critter are probably too long to hold the interest of most tots, but too short to really give a sense of the animal or its role in the ecosystem.

The pictures are pretty, and the next time I play a word game I have more vocabulary for the obscure letters:
quetzal
uakari
xenops
yapok
zorro
;)

But I do have to admit I just skimmed the book. I believe I would have liked it a bit more when I was, erm, about 6 or 7... but I don't know who loves it.


message 15: by Manybooks (new)

Manybooks | 7228 comments Mod
Cheryl wrote: "The Living Rain Forest is intriguing. It includes examples of tropical rainforests around the world, but no mention of temperate ones. The blurbs that tell about each critter are p..."

I have just skimmed this so far. I like the pictures and the information presented, but I agree, that there could have been a bit more (at least supplemental) information included (I have found some wonderful ABC books on animals that do precisely that). But I think the biggest drawback with this book is that the location of the different animals is not on the "animal page, the letter page" but on the inside covers; I keep flipping back and forth to find where the different animals live, which is rather distracting and annoying (and would be most annoying if one were actually using this book in the classroom or reading it to a group of children at the library).


message 16: by Cheryl is busier irl atm., Newbery Club host (new)

Cheryl is busier irl atm. (cherylllr) | 6248 comments Mod
True - that flipping back and forth was annoying. Maybe students could play some sort of memory game or quiz themselves or something....


message 17: by Manybooks (new)

Manybooks | 7228 comments Mod
Cheryl wrote: "True - that flipping back and forth was annoying. Maybe students could play some sort of memory game or quiz themselves or something...."

I just do not understand why this informatipn could not also have been part of the text or the illustrations (which do list the scientific name).


message 18: by Kathryn, The Princess of Picture-Books (last edited Sep 13, 2015 11:33AM) (new)

Kathryn | 5767 comments Mod
A North American Rain Forest Scrapbook I really enjoyed this one! I found it engagingly written and it contained so many great details about the flora and fauna of the temperate rain forest (specifically, the temperate rain forest of the Olympic area in Washington state). I've been fortunate enough to visit the forests there and they are sooo beautiful. I think Wright-Frierson really captured the feeling of wonder and awe one feels there (likening it to an enchanted or primeval forest--yup!) and I really liked the part where she turned her attention from the awesome trees and canopy above to looking at the remarkable and beautiful forest floor.

Personally, I don't feel watercolors are the best medium to capture all the lush vibrancy of this forest but that is just my own taste and other readers and artists will certainly beg to differ ;-) The illustrations do provide a great visual representation of what the text discusses.

I would be interested in reading her other picture book "journals" someday.


message 19: by Cheryl is busier irl atm., Newbery Club host (new)

Cheryl is busier irl atm. (cherylllr) | 6248 comments Mod
I have to admit a little envy of Virginia Wright-Frierson. Of course she's doing a great job and deserves it, I don't mean that, but goodness what a great career to do all that traveling and learning and to be able to get paid for it....


message 20: by Kathryn, The Princess of Picture-Books (new)

Kathryn | 5767 comments Mod
I agree, Cheryl! It's pretty much my dream job ;-)


message 21: by SamZ (new)

SamZ (samwisezbrown) | 220 comments Where the Forest Meets the Sea by Jeannie Baker This was a cute story, but it didn't blow me away. I liked the subtle message of the rainforests. The illustrations had hidden pictures or layered pictures, and I felt that it worked on some pages and didn't on others. Overall, just not something I'm likely to read again and didn't hold K(6)'s interest at all.


message 22: by Beverly, Miscellaneous Club host (new)

Beverly (bjbixlerhotmailcom) | 2333 comments Mod
Most Beautiful Roof in the World:
I don't have much to add after Cheryl's detailed notes above, and I pretty much agree with her assessments. I just wanted to add that the photographs added a great deal to the text information, in depicting just how tall the trees are, and how high the scientist has to go to do her research.


message 23: by Beverly, Miscellaneous Club host (last edited Sep 14, 2015 05:41PM) (new)

Beverly (bjbixlerhotmailcom) | 2333 comments Mod
Garden of the Spirit Bear:
This book had interesting and fascinating facts, plus beautiful watercolor paintings that extended the text. Since this book is 11 years old, I checked the website for the Valhalla Wilderness Society, and learned that two years after the book's publication (2004), in 2006, the area shown as proposed in the book, was finally turned into a preserve by the Canadian government. So that area is now protected for the benefit of the spirit bears, salmon, and other species that inhabit that area.


message 24: by Susan (new)

Susan | 27 comments I liked the illustrations in The Rainforest Grew All Around. It was definitely a good book for very young kids as a first introduction to the rain forest.


message 25: by SamZ (new)

SamZ (samwisezbrown) | 220 comments Susan wrote: "I liked the illustrations in The Rainforest Grew All Around. It was definitely a good book for very young kids as a first introduction to the rain forest."
I agree Susan! I loved the bright colors and beautiful illustrations, they make the book something that even pre-readers would love to sit and look through.
Also, the rhythm and add-on nature of the words make this a perfect read-aloud for younger kids. My 6 year old really liked it!


message 26: by Manybooks (last edited Sep 15, 2015 08:39AM) (new)

Manybooks | 7228 comments Mod
Sam wrote: "Where the Forest Meets the Sea by Jeannie BakerThis was a cute story, but it didn't blow me away. I liked the subtle message of the rainforests. The illustrations had hidden pictures or layered ..."

For me, I think this book would actually have worked better as a wordless picture book, as the illustrations are much more detailed and intricate than the rather sparse text. Apropos the illustrations, although I really enjoyed them and their detail, it does kind of bother me a bit that the author/illustrator supposedly made use of preserved collected natural materials for the collages. Considering that rainforests the world over are fragile and threatened, I hope that none of the collected and preserved natural materials came from the area (the rainforest) being depicted and described (as a contrast, in Wendy Pfeffer's A Log's Life, the illustrator actually made a point of showing that NONE of her collages used collected natural products, that they were ALL done with painted watercolour paper).


message 27: by Kathryn, The Princess of Picture-Books (new)

Kathryn | 5767 comments Mod
Beverly, I wasn't able to get "Spirit Bear" but it sounds so interesting and thank you for sharing the good news about the area being protected now! Always great to hear success stories especially when so much environmental news is gloomy.


message 28: by Manybooks (new)

Manybooks | 7228 comments Mod
Kathryn wrote: "Beverly, I wasn't able to get "Spirit Bear" but it sounds so interesting and thank you for sharing the good news about the area being protected now! Always great to hear success stories especially ..."

Unfortunately, logging claims are still an issue in the Great Bear Rainforest, and the BC government seems to be kind of caving in a bit.


message 29: by Beverly, Miscellaneous Club host (new)

Beverly (bjbixlerhotmailcom) | 2333 comments Mod
Gundula wrote: Unfortunately, logging claims are still an issue in the Great Bear Rainforest, and the BC government seems to be kind of caving in a bit.

That's too bad!


message 30: by Beverly, Miscellaneous Club host (new)

Beverly (bjbixlerhotmailcom) | 2333 comments Mod
A North American Rain Forest Scrapbook:
I don't have much to add to what others have already written about this interesting and fascinating book. The author-illustrator painted what she saw and experienced in the northwest rain forest, and I thought her paintings did justice to the text, and the scrapbook layout was interesting.


message 31: by Manybooks (new)

Manybooks | 7228 comments Mod
Beverly wrote: "Gundula wrote: Unfortunately, logging claims are still an issue in the Great Bear Rainforest, and the BC government seems to be kind of caving in a bit.

That's too bad!"


yes, it sure is, sigh ...


message 32: by Fjóla (last edited Sep 18, 2015 02:17PM) (new)

Fjóla (fjolarun) | 260 comments I was lucky to find most of these books, aside from the photo illustrated ones and they were all truly beautiful and interesting, awesome picks.

The Rainforest Grew seems indeed very enticing for young children through its vivid forest pictures and simple cumulative rhyme, but the extra informational bits on the pages, and then also in particular the observations and quizzes at the end of the book will keep the elementary grader interested as well. My kid is a factoid sponge and he loves books like this.

I've been touched by Jeannie Baker's books before and Where the Forest Meets the Sea is yet another great one. We may think that subjects of conservation have been hammered into youth for a long time, but note that this book is actually close to 30 years old. It's quite sparse and both the pictures and the text are pretty candid. While the text wasn't all that extensive, it was sort of meditative and I thought it brought some focus to each of the page spreads. The intricate pictures are downright fascinating. I will admit that I was a few pages in when I realized how "ghost pictures" were reoccurring. That was a "cool" touch.

And finally, I really liked how the Rain Forest Scrapbook was set up, the scrapbook feel of it made it so authentic and organic for me. I thought that was a great way of "pulling the reader in". I particularly liked how the pictures displayed different angles, some are up close, others looking up, standing in the shade observing animals, or agains the gleaming light. I also liked how the people were casually featured in some of the pictures. This, and a number of other little touches applied made me feel as if I was on that expedition with them. Or at least that I could have been ...

Now, the watercolors do subdue the colors in the pictures a bit, but they did seem a good fit for depicting all the little delicate things and details observed.


message 33: by Jenny (last edited Sep 21, 2015 01:38PM) (new)

Jenny | 722 comments I am unable to get The Living Rainforest: An Animal Alphabet or Garden of the Spirit Bear: Life in the Great Northern Rainforest and I am still waiting for A North American Rain Forest Scrapbook to come through ILL.

I liked The Rainforest Grew All Around. My 7 year old enjoyed it a lot also. Not much to add other than that we both appreciated the facts included on each page. The illustrations are bright and a nice match to the song and topic.

Where the Forest Meets the Sea
The illustrations are quite remarkable...I love the texture created by these relief collages. I especially loved the illustration of the hollow, ancient tree that he climbs inside. I appreciate that the story highlights an Australian forest and contains a map and a little more information in the back. However, the text didn't wow me.


message 34: by SamZ (new)

SamZ (samwisezbrown) | 220 comments Finally got around to reading Garden of the Spirit Bear Life in the Great Northern Rainforest by Dorothy Hinshaw Patent . I really liked the way this book was stuffed with facts that were broken up into different sections. I think that makes a book with this much information more accessible to younger readers. Also, I really enjoyed the "circle of life" discussion in the salmon sections. It was a great discussion on how salmon get nutrients from the sea, bears from salmon, and trees and other plant life in turn get nutrients from bear feces and decomposing salmon (or eventually bears, too).


message 35: by Cheryl is busier irl atm., Newbery Club host (new)

Cheryl is busier irl atm. (cherylllr) | 6248 comments Mod
Sam, I agree with your assessment of Garden of the Spirit Bear: Life in the Great Northern Rainforest. The only thing I'd add is that it was a little long for those of us with short attention spans. The sections helped, but I still skimmed a lot.


message 36: by SamZ (new)

SamZ (samwisezbrown) | 220 comments The Most Beautiful Roof in the World Exploring the Rainforest Canopy by Kathryn Lasky
An in-depth look at a day in the life of scientist Meg Lowman and her research in the canopy section of the Blue Creek Rainforest in Belize. There was some interesting information in this book, but I think it could have been presented differently to hold the reader's attention better: I got bored with the book and had to come back to it several times in order to finish. I don't think I'd even try to read it with K(6). I did like the descriptions of the ant gardens; I had never heard of those before. I would be interested in learning more about canopy walkway construction and other technological improvements made in the last 20 years.
Also: I have no qualms about Ms. Lowman killing the spider. I hate them all. :)


message 37: by SamZ (new)

SamZ (samwisezbrown) | 220 comments Cheryl wrote: "Sam, I agree with your assessment of Garden of the Spirit Bear: Life in the Great Northern Rainforest. The only thing I'd add is that it was a little long for those of us with short..."

Yes Cheryl, I agree on it's length. I found myself thinking it would be great to read to 2nd or 3rd graders as part of a unit on rain forests, doing a different section each day. I liked all of the information, though, so that kept my attention. Unlike the Most Beautiful Roof, which was also broken up into sections but didn't keep me engaged at all.


message 38: by Manybooks (last edited Sep 23, 2015 02:59PM) (new)

Manybooks | 7228 comments Mod
Sam wrote: "The Most Beautiful Roof in the World Exploring the Rainforest Canopy by Kathryn Lasky
An in-depth look at a day in the life of scientist Meg Lowman and her research in the canopy section of the ..."


I actually would have liked to have seen more of a glossary, and while I loved the photographs, I think a combination of photographs and line illustrations would have held my interest more. And I am sorry to say that I found the last part where Lasky describes Dr. Bowman readidng to her sons, while sweet, a bit monotonous; I skimmed that as I was getting a bit bored.


message 39: by Manybooks (new)

Manybooks | 7228 comments Mod
Sam wrote: "Cheryl wrote: "Sam, I agree with your assessment of Garden of the Spirit Bear: Life in the Great Northern Rainforest. The only thing I'd add is that it was a little long for those o..."

I also found this much more engaging, perhaps because it is a Canadian story.


message 40: by Jenny (new)

Jenny | 722 comments I got The Living Rainforest: An Animal Alphabet (didn't think I was going to be able to.). Here's my review: A nice mix of animals from a variety of tropical rain forests are presented with a short description of each. Many of the animals will be familiar to readers but there are some that were less familiar or unfamiliar to me such as the Hawaiian honeycreeper, the xenops, and the yapok. The letter of the alphabet, the name of the animal and its description are on one side of each double page spread with a nice illustration on the other side.

And A North American Rain Forest Scrapbook just arrived yesterday through ILL so I will get to that this upcoming week.


message 41: by Jenny (new)

Jenny | 722 comments A North American Rain Forest Scrapbook. Wow! This was worth waiting for through ILL. The text and illustrations pair beautifully to teach about Washington's Olympic Park, a temperate rain forest. The text is detailed but intriguing enough to hold early elementary students' attention. Really wonderful. I hope I can get a chance to read her two books An Island Scrapbook: Dawn to Dusk on a Barrier Island and A Desert Scrapbook: Dawn to Dusk in the Sonoran Desert . Oh, and I was totally grossed out reading about the guide licking a banana slug. But my husband totally would if someone bet him to do it. Yuck!


message 42: by Manybooks (new)

Manybooks | 7228 comments Mod
Jenny wrote: "A North American Rain Forest Scrapbook. Wow! This was worth waiting for through ILL. The text and illustrations pair beautifully to teach about Washington's Olympic Park, a temperate..."

I tend to be adventurous with food, but I would not lick a live slug. Yuck, but also, I bet the slug would also not enjoy being licked.


message 43: by Jenny (new)

Jenny | 722 comments True. Plus, the guide said it left his mouth numb for an hour. Unpleasant for both slug and human.


message 44: by Manybooks (last edited Oct 18, 2015 10:30PM) (new)

Manybooks | 7228 comments Mod
Jenny wrote: "True. Plus, the guide said it left his mouth numb for an hour. Unpleasant for both slug and human."

maybe more than unpleasant, a numb mouth means toxicity in my opinion


message 45: by Jenny (new)

Jenny | 722 comments Yes. I'm sure it does...while it didn't say it was toxic, it said that was the slug's defense.


message 46: by Jenny (new)

Jenny | 722 comments That leads me to agree with your assessment.


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