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Archived Author Help > How do you guys cope with one star reviews?

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message 1: by Morris (last edited Aug 18, 2015 02:59PM) (new)

Morris Graham (morris_g) The lowest I have gotten is a two-star. I think that what is needed is to read what they have to say. If there is any valid criticism, then you got points for the next edition of this book. I made four editions of my book, and much of the changes were because of reviews. I remember a Russian guy from Moscow named Sergei who was helping me with some Russian cultural stuff. He was looking at a chapter I had started, and informed me that I should learn how to write so I would not fill the world with bad literature. Well, that stung! However, he gave me some things to do to see how writers (I was writing about a boxing match) actually did it. The result? I swallowed my pride, took his advise, and it resulted in what I believe is the best chapter I've ever written.

The moral of this story? Don't run from criticism, embrace it and be willing to change.


message 2: by April (last edited Aug 18, 2015 03:21PM) (new)

April Wilson (aprilwilson) I just got my first (and only, so far) 1-star review on Amazon last week. It was painful, no doubt about it. I happen to disagree with the opinion the reviewer expressed (I think the criticism is invalid), so I didn't give it much credence.

Not every person is going to like every book. There are some books that I as a reader absolutely adore and want to give 100 stars. But undoubtedly someone will give that same book just 1 star, which I think is nuts. So, there will always be someone who hates something; it's just that way it is - 99 people might LOVE a book, and 1 person might detest it.

How do I deal with a 1-star review? Here's my trick... There's a person I know who is really mean; when I get a bad review, I pretend that person left it. Then it doesn't hurt so much, because that person is mean to everyone and hates everything.

It's important for us to read the negative criticism we receive, so that we can consider whether or not it's valid. If it is valid, then it's an opportunity for improvement. Fix the problem! That's one of the great things about indie publishing e-books (if that's what you do). We can fix things anytime we want. Our books aren't set in stone. :)

If you're not sure if the negative criticism is valid or not, ask a friend or engage some beta readers to evaluate the issue for you.

April


message 3: by Ty (new)

Ty (tyunglebo) | 50 comments I am pretty new to the fold, my books does not have many reviews of any kind, one star included. But I have prepared myself for the eventual appearance of one-stars.

My plan has always been to not pay a lot of attention to them, myself. It is bad enough knowing I got one, I don't feel the need to find out why they hated my book.

Plus, avoiding them eliminates any slight temptation for a knee-jerk reaction on my part, internally or externally.


message 4: by Eric (new)

Eric Stockwell | 31 comments For a one star review, I'd probably cry while digging into a pint of ice cream. Mmmmm ice cream; that tends to make things better. I understand that my response wasn't as profound as some of the others, but not everything requires deep insight. As others have pointed out, it's impossible to satisfy everyone.


message 5: by Melissa (new)

Melissa Silvey (msilveywrites) | 14 comments assume the fetal position and cry like a baby... especially since I'm 99% sure the person never read the book.


message 6: by Melissa (new)

Melissa Jensen (kdragon) | 468 comments For me, it would depend. If all I got were one-star reviews, or more one-stars than, say, five, four, three or even two stars, I'd probably get depressed for a bit then revise the book and try to fix whatever was wrong.

But if it was only one one-star among five stars, four, three and so on, I don't think it would bug me as much. All you can really do is try harder or dismiss the negative, because you'll always have naysayers (even some best sellers have at least a few one or two star reviews).

What's really helped me, though, is becoming aware of just how nit-picky people can be. I've gotten people who would get hung up on the most trivial things, things that weren't even an issue. I had one person who couldn't wrap their head around that this one character was unable to make a fire. The character in question was wet, cold, exhausted, emotionally wrung out and his best friend was writhing in agony beside him. To me it made perfect sense that the character would have difficulty getting a fire going. To the reader, it made no sense at all. We had to agree to disagree. But it woke me up to the fact that it doesn't matter how well you write or how well you clean up a story, there will always be someone out there who will find something about a story they don't like, whether it's a valid dislike or not, and that's okay.

Unless they're being a jerk about it, of course.


message 7: by Riley, Viking Extraordinaire (last edited Aug 18, 2015 04:17PM) (new)

Riley Amos Westbrook (sonshinegreene) | 1510 comments Mod
I use it as fuel for the fire! Pour that self-loathing into your work that way your readers feel it when your character does something reprehensible even to himself.
In all honesty, I ignore reviews now, other than as an attempt to figure out this marketing thing. Doing the experiment of having as many honest reviews as I can BEFORE Everyone Dies At The End comes out, so I can use that to launch to bigger sales. (Hopefully, but that's why they call it an experiment!)


message 8: by Ty (new)

Ty (tyunglebo) | 50 comments Joseph wrote: "Yeah, I agree with you Morris about using it as feedback and bettering the work, I guess it's the ones that say something like "Not worth the buy" that seem to validate the reviews that leave one s..."

I suppose where I am coming from, I prefer to do the best work I can, and let those who choose to read it decide if it is their thing or not. I have editors and beta readers for my personal feedback as needed, but I don't want to get into the trap of writing for the reviews.


message 9: by A. (new)

A. Russo (A_Russo) | 3 comments I'm still new to self-pubbing and have been lucky enough to avoid the dreaded one star (though I've gotten two). I'm at the point that I almost wish I'd get just one, because then I could stop stressing about it and get it over with (like ripping off a band-aid), but then again, no, dang it, I don't want to! So incredibly conflicted.

And then I remind myself that getting a two-star review (which is all I've got to base my reactions on) was not the end of the world. Someone clearly did not like what I wrote and, you know what? The sun still came up the next morning. My biggest complaint, after the initial shock of seeing it, was annoyance that they didn't write a review. Because honestly, if you tell me you didn't like it I want to know WHY.

Then I mulled that over a bit and grudgingly (VERY grudgingly) admitted that no one who reads what I write is obligated to tell me why they did or didn't like it, it just would have been nice.

Mind you, all this happened in about ten minutes' time. I got over it pretty quickly, because the end result of all this was that I was happy with what I wrote. I told the story I wanted to tell. Someone who actually wasn't me, a family member, or a close friend actually purchased my novella and read it and liked it! That's an overall win. So if one person didn't like it, I'm cool with that. You can't please everyone.

Now, had I gotten only one-star reviews, I'd probably be pulling out my hair and curling up in a fetal position in the corner. I'm pretty sure, though, that the occasional one or two star rating is not going to kill me as long as I keep my zen and remember the old saying:

"I can only please one person per day. Today is not your day. Tomorrow's not looking good either."

Hope that helps a little.:)


message 10: by Joe (new)

Joe Jackson (shoelessauthor) It will depend on whether it's accompanied by valid criticism or not. If there's nothing with it, then you just have to shrug it off as a troll or whatever. If it has valid criticism, then you get angry, you deny it, then you accept it, and work to get better. If it has invalid criticism or just angry spew, then you ask to have it removed.


message 11: by Alicia (new)

Alicia Chumney (ajchumneywrites) | 26 comments I've gotten that dreaded 1 star. Considering others have left 3 stars and my friends are telling me "it's perfect, aside from some typos," I started to cry about it for a moment, but then I sent it to somebody else to edit it and chalked the 1 star (with no comment) up to the fact that I dared to use language in my young adult story. Teenagers cuss, some more than others, and not everybody is going to like that. It's just more difficult to grasp when there is no other feedback as to why someone decided to leave a single star.


message 12: by Christina (new)

Christina McMullen (cmcmullen) Your best bet is to simply let it go and realize that no one is 100% loved by everyone. Punch a pillow or toss back a shot. Give yourself about one minute to vent and rage if you need to, but then forget about it. Everyone is entitled to their opinion, whether you agree with them or not. Move on and keep writing.


message 13: by Alicia (new)

Alicia Chumney (ajchumneywrites) | 26 comments Joseph wrote: "It never it came into my mind that readers woukd be offended with cursing. My book is loaded with f-bombs, as you said teenagers cuss."

It didn't either to me until after I wrote it and one of my betas commented on it. I'm in a hs classroom on a regular basis and told her that they'll cuss when they think the teachers and subs aren't listening.


message 14: by Anfenwick (new)

Anfenwick (anne-fenwick) | 10 comments A rating without a review isn't worth much, either to the author or other readers, but here's one tip: if you're able to compare the rater's books with yours and you discover that a) they don't like what you like, b) they rate very differently from the way you would, c) they have some very specific antipathies (I mean the way some people hate sad endings, or unlikeable characters, or the opposite)..., well then, they may just have happened on your book by accident and it wasn't their thing. Perhaps it might help to tweak your blurb and positioning if you end up with several data points suggesting the same thing.


message 15: by Owen (last edited Aug 18, 2015 09:07PM) (new)

Owen O'Neill (owen_r_oneill) | 1509 comments A 1-star rating is basically meaningless. If the person could not be bothered to state a reason for disliking the book, that's their prerogative, but as it conveys no useful information, one might as well ignore it. (Now if there are many 1-star ratings, maybe a book is reaching the wrong audience or maybe there is trolling going on.)

I'll add that a 5-star rating doesn't tell me much either, since I don't know why the person liked the book.

A 1-star review might contain useful data, but this is rare. Those we've gotten are people who just didn't like the book. That is their personal opinion and while that's fine, it has no effect on us whatsoever. Our books are not intended to please everyone, or for that matter anyone. People disliking our book is not different than a personal dislike for broccoli. It often helpful to check the other reviews a person left -- if they leave a lot of 1-star reviews, that is telling.

When it comes to the valid criticism question, I'm of two minds. Yes, we authors should pay attention to "valid" criticism. But what's valid? Almost everyone's criticism seems valid to them. I like to write in a style many people dislike. We like prologues, we like telling (not showing) when telling is fun, I'm very fond of long (very long) complex sentences, and a dozen other things that are widely condemned. People who don't find these things to their taste can cite any number of perfectly "valid" criticisms in regard to these so. So what? These things are all a matter of fashion and personal taste, nothing more.

So, in my view, the only truly valid criticisms apply to things that relate to a book basic readiness for publication (formatting and editing). If a published book suffers this regard, it was not ready, and it shouldn't take a review to determine that.

In the past, authors (reportedly) often made a practice of ignoring reviews of their work. While I imagine few of us are willing to do that (I'm not), I have no doubt it would be better if we did. Good reviews can be just as misleading as bad ones, and as a practical matter, the usefulness of reviews for improving our writing is so small as to not be worth it.

Perhaps 1% (or less) of readers leave reviews and they are not likely to be representative of our other readers. So in that sense, reviews are useless even for telling how are books are being received and what most of our readers perceive the strengths and weaknesses of our work to be.

In the end, reviews are 99% about ego -- ours and the reviewer's. Sites don't allow reviews to be posted because they have much practical value (with specific exceptions of which books are not one). Sites do it because people want to be heard. People like interactivity. And as discussed elsewhere, the number of reviews is a rough gauge of a work's ability to generate interest. But that is a different thing than the content of the reviews.

If you want to improve your writing, surround yourself with people who appreciate your work, and whom you respect. Listen to them. Ignore everyone else. If you can do that, the reviews you get become merely entertainment -- which is pretty much what they should be.


message 16: by Owen (new)

Owen O'Neill (owen_r_oneill) | 1509 comments April wrote: "I just got my first (and only, so far) 1-star review on Amazon last week. It was painful, no doubt about it. I happen to disagree with the opinion the reviewer expressed (I think the criticism is invalid), so I didn't give it much credence."

April, I saw that review and it was invalid. It had nothing to do with your book (which I've read). The reviewer had their erroneous opinions stepped on (and yes, I am qualified to state the reviewer's opinion is factual inaccurate). This is a good example of why reviews should be ignored. I imagine it was painful, but it happens and there is no reason for any of us to be hurt by a person (like this particular reviewer) who has no idea what she is talking about.


message 17: by Owen (new)

Owen O'Neill (owen_r_oneill) | 1509 comments Joseph wrote: "As much as I like the response, what do you say in regards of reviews leading to more purchases? Isn't that the sole reason for them aside from the interactivity you mentioned? "

This is a complex topic (and BTW, there is another thread here on that specific topic for additional POVs). First, it might be worth pointing out that a review of, say, a monitor is different than a review of a book. Monitors have performance specs that are fairly broadly agreed upon and books don't. So book reviewers are not speaking the same "language": if I say a book has beautiful prose and well-developed characters, others are going to be hard-pressed to know what I mean without investigating my tastes in some detail. But if I say a monitor was fuzzy and malfunctioned after 3 months, there is little ambiguity.

That is probably obvious, but when we read book reviews, we see a lot of just that: purely subjective opinions that are unlikely to reflect our tastes. Thus, I'm on record here as being dubious about reviews as a sales driver. In the broad sense, this I believe is true, because the number and indeed rating value is not a good predictor of sales: it is easy to find examples where books with few or no reviews have excellent sales, while the opposite is also true.

But that not the whole story. First, genre probably matters. For example, I have an idea that romance readers may, on the whole, pay attention to reviews more than sci-fi readers. Also, reviews I think act differently at different time in a book's "lifetime". Reviews that are organically gained from customers (not those from reviews who were provided with a copy for the purpose of a reviewing a book) are a proxy for success, and therefore at some point, the sheer number suggests that a book is well liked and probably encourages people to buy. But such books are already successful, so determining the role of reviews in sustaining that success as opposed to all the other things a successful book has going for it, is problematic.

So I believe it's a mixed bag. The main thing that I think reviews only matter to the extent that they are from paying customers. So in that sense, we authors are powerless in regards to reviews. Which (in my view) is another reason not to pay much attention to them.


message 18: by Rachael (new)

Rachael Eyre (rachaeleyre) | 192 comments The majority of my one star reviews are from people who didn't realise it was a lesbian story (so didn't read the book description) and think the book is pornographic trash. There's an even enough balance of stars for me not to feel insecure.

The downer is that an outraged or critical reader is far more likely to leave a review. The one person who's left a written review on Goodreads is a one star; while I wish it could take it down, she's entitled to her opinion. She gave it a low rating because she "didn't like Miss Benson's behaviour" - well, it is an erotic thriller, not a romance.


message 19: by Michele (new)

Michele Clack | 10 comments I've come across a reviewer on Amazon who gives good reviews to traditionally published books and likes to throw one stars at indie authors. Worth checking if you get a one star what they've rated other books.


message 20: by Martin (new)

Martin Wilsey | 447 comments Don't pretend you don't hunt them down and murder them in some horrible creative way after exposing their most embarrassing secret.

Well in your next book anyway.

Don't forget the "All persons and events are are fictitious" disclaimer...


message 21: by Ken (new)

Ken Doggett (kendoggett) It's all in the eye of the beholder. Years ago a story I published in a magazine was critized by one reader who said she hated the story because the main character took off his hand-woven slippers and threw them in the nearby river. The reader said that it takes a lot of time and care to handcraft things, and throwing them away like that was just callous.


message 22: by Victoria (new)

Victoria Schwimley (victoriaschwimley) | 161 comments I wouldn't take one star review to heart. I just reviewed a book that received a few one stars, but I absolutely loved. It's all a matter of preference. Unless the one stars are because of errors in the book, ignore them. If they give it a poor review because o errors. FIX IT.


message 23: by Morris (new)

Morris Graham (morris_g) Martin said, "Don't pretend you don't hunt them down and murder them in some horrible creative way after exposing their most embarrassing secret."

Maybe you can write a book about a fatal attraction author who hunts down a one-star reviewer.

ROFL


message 24: by Martin (new)

Martin Wilsey | 447 comments What? A serial killer of 1 star reviewers?

Damn. I need to move and change my identity again...


message 25: by T.L. (new)

T.L. Clark (tlcauthor) | 727 comments Oh noes! I've just had to leave a 1* GR review (=2* on Amazon) for someone! Time to employ a bodyguard??!!

I think Martin should write that fatal attraction book!
1* murderer strikes again (a serial book killer)!! :-O

In reality, not everybody is going to like your book.
You can't please all of the people all of the time, and all that.

I'm just hoping I'm not about to get trolled for the review I left. It was my honest opinion. There's plenty of 5*s on there, so hopefully the author won't be too traumatised.

If they are genuine low scores for my books I'm happy to take it on the chin. I'd like constructive criticism so I may improve.

However, if it's in retaliation, or someone who has read something out of their usual genre and hated it, then that's a different matter.

If you read my blog, you'll see that publishers themselves have said some very nasty things to people who have gone on to be writing heroes!
http://tlclarkauthor.blogspot.co.uk/2...

No such thing as bad publicity (unless they spell your name wrong)! ;-)


message 26: by April (new)

April Wilson (aprilwilson) Owen wrote: "April, I saw that review and it was invalid. It had nothing to do with your book (which I've read). The reviewer had their erroneous opinions stepped on (and yes, I am qualified to state the reviewer's opinion is factual inaccurate). This is a good example of why reviews should be ignored.."

Owen, I want you as my therapist. :) Thank you so much for what you said. And you really read my book? Really? Wow, I'm grateful. That's funny, because I got your book "The Alecto Initiative (Loralynn Kennakris, #1)" to read.

Thanks again! You always manage to cheer me up and give me some great info and insight into the indie pub world. :)

April


message 27: by Christina (new)

Christina McMullen (cmcmullen) It's okay to be upset. It's okay to feel hurt or feel that the reviewer is full of beans. However..

Just remember that reviews are the right of the reader and at the discretion of the site that hosts them.

If a review is abusive and in some way attacks the author, then that review is a violation of terms of service for most sites and should be flagged or reported.

Anything else, bad, good, wrong, or right, is out of your hands. Let it be. Engaging, whether directly by commenting on the review or making remarks elsewhere (reminder right now that this is not a private forum) that can be traced back to the specific review has more potential to damage your reputation as an author and will likely have no negative impact on the reviewer.

Please keep this in mind. We have had several threads on the subject of bad reviews and many we have had to lock because they stopped being helpful and veered into disparaging comments about reviewers. I'm already seeing echoes of those conversations. Yes, there are going to be people who target indies and yes, there will be people who are rude in their assessment. If they are breaking the rules, report them, if not, move on. They aren't worth the time you're wasting thinking about them.


message 28: by Wendi (last edited Aug 19, 2015 10:56AM) (new)

Wendi Wilson | 81 comments I got one 1-star review on Amazon.uk not long after I published. The reviewer basically said my book was a waste of money, contrived, and totally unbelievable (even for a paranormal book). It stung a little, but then I stalked them and read other reviews and this person is very generous with the the 1-stars.
All of my other reviews gush over how relatable my characters are, how they are amazed at how I portrayed the true insecurities of a teenaged girl, etc, etc. So I didn't take it to heart.
The problem is, after that review posted, I didn't sell another book on that site. Finally, after several weeks, I got another review that basically told the first reviewer that they were stupid and needed to learn how to read (Ha!) and gave me 5-stars, which brought my average up to a 3-star rating on uk. And I sold another book there.

Every other review I have received has contradicted these statements. Sometimes you just have to suck it up and take the bad with the good. Everyone has their opinion and some people are just not very nice about it.

BTW April, I totally agree with Owen. That review wasn't about your book, it was about someone's preconceived notion of the situation. You can't please everyone. If you had made her reactions different, then everyone else might not have loved it as much as we did. <3


message 29: by Charles (new)

Charles Hash | 1054 comments https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S1qon...

I'm just gonna leave that here.


message 30: by Alicia (new)

Alicia Chumney (ajchumneywrites) | 26 comments April, I went to check out that review and it actually made me want to read your book even more. I may only be on Chapter 4, but that's only because I had to go to bed. I was a psych minor in college and it seems to be on point so far. I'm also fairly critical about the psychological reactions of characters during situations if that helps any.

It's odd, but for me sometimes 1 star reviews with comments make me want to read the book even more to form my own opinion.


message 31: by April (new)

April Wilson (aprilwilson) Wendi wrote: "BTW April, I totally agree with Owen. That review wasn't about your book, it was about someone's preconceived notion of the situation. You can't please everyone. If you had made her reactions different, then everyone else might not have loved it as much as we did. <3 "

Thank you, Wendi! That's very kind of you to say that. I looked at the reviews she left for other novels, and they were predominantly negative.

I'm sorry you suffered a "1-star" review, too. Apparently, she doesn't know Jeremy like we know Jeremy. :)

April


message 32: by April (new)

April Wilson (aprilwilson) Charles wrote: "https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S1qon...

I'm just gonna leave that here."


That was classic. Thanks!

April


message 33: by Mike (new)

Mike Robbins (mikerobbins) | 61 comments Morris wrote: "Martin said, "Don't pretend you don't hunt them down and murder them in some horrible creative way after exposing their most embarrassing secret."

Maybe you can write a book about a fatal attracti..."


Fact is stranger than fiction - someone did hunt down a reviewer in Britain recently, followed them to a supermarket and brained them from behind with a wine bottle. I understand he didn't hurt her too badly, fortunately (and yes, he was charged).


message 34: by Joe (new)

Joe Jackson (shoelessauthor) April - honestly, from that review, it seems like the person who left it has probably gone through something similar or knows someone who has, and just objects to your characters' actions because it doesn't mesh with their views or preconceived notions (as Wendi said).

Basically, what it comes down to is there's nothing there for you to take from it as far as constructive criticism, so brush it off as an outlier.


message 35: by Riley, Viking Extraordinaire (new)

Riley Amos Westbrook (sonshinegreene) | 1510 comments Mod
Wendi wrote: "This was the review: "I didn't enjoy this at all. It was very contrived and completely unrealistic (even for a paranormal book!) it wasn't written particularly well either, I wouldn't waste your money with this one, there are much better options out there!"

This is the stuff we don't want to see guys. We understand you had a bad review, it sucks, it happens. But posts like this on a public forum can hurt you in the long run. If you have a bad review, people can take the time to look at it if they'd like. Otherwise, please keep it off the board!


message 36: by K.P. (new)

K.P. Merriweather (kp_merriweather) | 266 comments ehh i used to sweat bad reviews but now i have seen the overall theme (my target audience is off. though it's technically YA the slang is 20 years old... so today's kids are not going to get it. and i wrote these things as a teenager. *shrug*)
a bad review is just one persons opinion and more free publicity. and hell they already bought it so i got mad paid already lolz =^_^=


message 37: by Wendi (last edited Aug 19, 2015 10:57AM) (new)

Wendi Wilson | 81 comments Riley wrote: "Wendi wrote: "This was the review: "I didn't enjoy this at all. It was very contrived and completely unrealistic (even for a paranormal book!) it wasn't written particularly well either, I wouldn't..."

Sorry! Message received! I removed that bit, Riley.


message 38: by Riley, Viking Extraordinaire (new)

Riley Amos Westbrook (sonshinegreene) | 1510 comments Mod
Wendi wrote: "Riley wrote: "Wendi wrote: "This was the review: "I didn't enjoy this at all. It was very contrived and completely unrealistic (even for a paranormal book!) it wasn't written particularly well eith..."

Thank you Wendi!


message 39: by Martin (new)

Martin Wilsey | 447 comments There is another kind of 1 star review some authors get sometime in their writing career.

A vengeance review.

This is when you have pissed off someone in your like that decides to be petty and give you a bad review. It Happens.


message 40: by Jenny (new)

Jenny Allen (lilithadamsseries) | 9 comments I've only received 1 so far and since it was here and I was curious, I clicked on her profile. Turns out she is a huge Twilight fan. Since my book gets almost all 4 and 5 (mostly 5) star reviews and I poke fun at Twilight at least 6 times in the first book, I believe I figured out her reasoning for the 1 star.


message 41: by Dwayne, Head of Lettuce (new)

Dwayne Fry | 4270 comments Mod
Joseph wrote: "As you all know, reviews are hard to come by. But the one star review--either with a terrible comment or just that sinlge solitary star; how do you guys handle it? I've gotten two so far, and it al..."

One thing you can do when you get a one-star review is take a look a reviews given to some of the greatest authors of all time. Look at reviews given to Shakespeare, Twain, Dickens and Tolstoy. Notice they all have a heap of one-star reviews. Now, notice they are all dead. It's probably the one-star reviews on Goodreads that killed them.

Fear the one-star review.

Or, don't give it any power over you.

It's your choice.


message 42: by Jamie (new)

Jamie Campbell | 49 comments I cut off my ear and gave it to a prostitute.


message 43: by Dwayne, Head of Lettuce (new)

Dwayne Fry | 4270 comments Mod
Some other stuff to think about when you get a negative review:

1. No writer has ever pleased anyone. You will not be the first. You will get negative reviews. But, the one thing that is worse than getting negative reviews is not publishing at all. So, write, publish and take the occasional punch. The four and five star reviewers you get will be glad you took the plunge.

2. Be your own worst critic. Then nothing a negative review says will top (or bottom) what you already think.

3. Reviews are nothing but opinions, left by one reader for others. Don't let them become personal messages to you.

4. Sometimes negative reviews can be helpful. If you get one that says, "I really hate stories where polka-dotted apes fall in love with anorexic robots", maybe the next person that reads that review is looking for a book about anorexic robots and polka-dotted apes. But, really, those are a dime a dozen these days.


message 44: by Jenny (new)

Jenny Allen (lilithadamsseries) | 9 comments Joseph wrote: "Lmao @Jenny I'll be adding your book to my shelf then."
There are digs in the sequel (Rose of Jericho), too. It's just too easy. LOL


message 45: by Jenny (new)

Jenny Allen (lilithadamsseries) | 9 comments Dwayne wrote: "Some other stuff to think about when you get a negative review:

1. No writer has ever pleased anyone. You will not be the first. You will get negative reviews. But, the one thing that is worse tha..."


Kudos. Very well put!


message 46: by April (new)

April Wilson (aprilwilson) Martin wrote: "There is another kind of 1 star review some authors get sometime in their writing career.

A vengeance review."


The idea of a vengeance review is scary. I know that they happen - sometimes in mass droves. And that's frightening.

April


message 47: by April (new)

April Wilson (aprilwilson) A.J. wrote: "April, I went to check out that review and it actually made me want to read your book even more. I may only be on Chapter 4, but that's only because I had to go to bed. I was a psych minor in colle..."

A.J., wow! I'm thrilled that you took the time to look into it. And if you're reading it, that's awesome! I hope you like it. I would be really interested in your opinion, especially given your psych education background. Beth's response to trauma and anxiety is obviously a big part of the book, as is Shane's strategy and determination to help her overcome it. The theme of the book is that she wants to overcome her past; that's why the reviewer's comments didn't make any sense. The character, herself, states that she wants to overcome her past once and for all and move forward with her life.

I'd love it if you keep me posted on your impressions, but if you don't want to, that's fine, too. :)

April


message 48: by April (new)

April Wilson (aprilwilson) Joe wrote: "April - honestly, from that review, it seems like the person who left it has probably gone through something similar or knows someone who has, and just objects to your characters' actions because i..."

Thanks, Joe! I appreciate you taking the time to look at the review and post your thoughts.

Thanks!

April


message 49: by Annie (new)

Annie Matthews (anniebmatthews) | 27 comments I don't mind a low review as the book is written and I am happy to take on board criticism. Although I did get one 2 star that commented that there wasn't any sex...I'm writing YA. Not sure when sex became a requirement?! I disregarded that one as not sure if was the reason for the 2 star, or just a comment.
It does make me a little sad though, before I take on board the advice. I figure that's only natural.


message 50: by Alicia (new)

Alicia Chumney (ajchumneywrites) | 26 comments April wrote: "A.J. wrote: "April, I went to check out that review and it actually made me want to read your book even more. I may only be on Chapter 4, but that's only because I had to go to bed. I was a psych m..."

Well, April, my impressions so far are that I wish I didn't have to work tomorrow so I could keep reading.

I'm at Chapter 14 and, sure, they are moving fast and I'm wondering about Shane's motivations, but Beth is doing exactly what I'd expect. She's frustrated by her inability to connect to others, but she would feel safe with Shane because of his job and his age - he'd be more mature than her age group. I saw her desires like that cupcake in my kitchen - I want the cupcake, but don't need it today. Naturally, that's all I'm thinking about. She's not all in either and it's great that Shane is trying to get her to lower her guard. So far the content is perfect.


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