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Daniel and the Revelation
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BIBLE STUDY > BIBLE STUDY (DANIEL, EZEKIEL, and REVELATION) WEEK # 2

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message 1: by Evangelist (new)

Evangelist Jordan (chosenwithcare) | 1925 comments Mod
Date: 8-18-15


Part I Continue: Daniel Chapters 1-6

"THE BOOK OF DANIEL"

Chapter One

The book opens with the first deportation of Jews to Babylonian captivity (605 B.C.), and the selection of Daniel and his three friends for special training (1-7). Daniel is commitment to remain undefiled is blessed by God, and he along with his friends are given wisdom that is acknowledged and rewarded by the king of Babylon (8-21).

POINTS TO PONDER:

* Young Daniel's commitment to God in pagan environment
* How Daniel was able to keep both his faith to God and service to the king

Chapter Two

Nebuchadnezzar has a dream, challenging his would-be interpreters to first tell him the contents of the dream (1-13). God reveals the dream to Daniel (14-23) who then interprets it for the king (24-45). Impressed, the king promotes Daniel, and in turn, his three friends
(46-49).

POINTS TO PONDER:
* The kingdoms represented by the image in Nebuchadnezzar's dream
* The kingdom which shall never be destroyed: its identity and establishment

Chapter Three

Nebuchadnezzar builds a large image of gold, demanding all to worship it (1-7). Shadrach, Meshach, and Abed-Nego refuse, and are thrown into a fiery furnace. Yet they are saved by God (8-25), prompting King Nebuchadnezzar to praise their God as the Most High (26-30).

POINTS TO PONDER:
* Faith in the face of fire
* The fourth person in the fiery furnace (angel or Christ?)

Chapter Four

Nebuchadnezzar has another dream, this one of a great tree that fills the earth and then is cut down but its trunk left intact, followed by a man whose heart is changed and becomes like an animal (1-18). Daniel interprets the dream as applying to the king, that he might know that God rules in the kingdoms of men (19-27). A year later the dream is fulfilled, and Nebuchadnezzar praises, blesses and honors the Most High God, King of heaven (28-37).

POINTS TO PONDER:
* The Most High rules in the kingdoms of men
* He sets over the kingdoms of men the lowest of men, or whomever He
chooses.

Chapter Five

This chapter fast forwards to 539 B.C. and the last night of Babylonian rule. King Belshazzar (grandson of Nebuchadnezzar) throws a drunken, idolatrous feast that is interrupted by a hand writing on the wall (1-12). Daniel is brought in, and explains that it proclaims the judgment of Belshazzar and the fall of Babylon into the hands of the Medes and Persians (13-29) which occurs that very night (30-31).

POINTS TO PONDER:
* The character of King Belshazzar contrasted with that of Daniel
* The meaning of the writing on the wall as explained by Daniel

Chapter Six

Daniel's character, conviction and courage are seen once more in this well known account of "Daniel in the lion's den". Despite his age (nearing ninety), Daniel serves his king with an excellent spirit and his God with unwavering faith. A plot by enemies is set to destroy him (1-9) and he is cast into a den of lions (10-17). God sends an angel to deliver him (18-23), prompting King Darius of the Medes to praise the living God of Daniel (24-28).

POINTS TO PONDER:
* The excellent character and faith of Daniel, the man of God
* Daniel as a role model for young and old, statesmen and administrators

Daniel Chapter 7-12

Chapter Seven

In the first year of Belshazzar (552 B.C.), Daniel receives two visions. The first is of four beasts from the sea (1-8). The second involves a judgment by the Ancient of Days, and the coronation of the Son of Man (9-14). The interpretation describes persecution by elements of the fourth beast (kingdom), with ultimate victory by the saints of the Most High (15-28).

POINTS TO PONDER:
* The identity of the four kingdoms represented by the four beasts
* The identity of the Son of Man and the timing of His coronation
* The conflict between the fourth kingdom and the saints of the Most
High

Chapter Eight

In the third year of King Belshazzar (550 B.C.) Daniel has another vision: a swift goat defeating a mighty ram. The goat's large horn is then broken into four horns, followed by a little horn that brings desolation to the sanctuary and the host of heaven (1-14). The angel Gabriel interprets the vision which foretells the rise of a fierce and mighty king (Antiochus IV Epiphanes, 175-164 B.C.) that would bring desolation against the holy people (15-27).

POINTS TO PONDER:
* The interpretation of Daniel's vision in this chapter
* The meaning of the expression, "the time of the end"

Chapter Nine

In the first year of Darius (539 B.C.), understanding that Jeremiah's prophecy of 70 years of captivity has been fulfilled (Jeremiah 25:11), Daniel confesses his nation's sins and prays that God will restore them (1-19). In response, Gabriel is sent to give Daniel understanding of key events that will take place in a time period of 70 "weeks" (lit., "sevens"), one of the most challenging prophecies in the Bible (20-27).

POINTS TO PONDER:
* Daniel's prayer, confessing the sins of his people Israel
* The difficulty in interpreting the vision of seventy weeks

Chapter Ten

In the third year of Darius (ca. 535 B.C.) Daniel receives a vision that will affect his people (Israel) "in the latter days" (Daniel 10:14), its words to be closed and sealed "till the time of the end" (Daniel 12:9). "The Vision Of The Time Of The End" begins with an appearance of a "glorious man" to Daniel beside the Tigris River (1-9), with an explanation for his delay in coming (10-21). The prophecy of the vision continues in chapters eleven and twelve.

POINTS TO PONDER:
* The meaning of the phrase "in the latter days" as used in the vision
* The angelic conflict behind the scenes briefly described by the "glorious man"

Chapter Eleven

After introductory comments in chapter ten, "The Vision Of The Time Of The End" begins in earnest. A brief prophecy of a Persian-Greek conflict (2-4) is followed by the description of a lengthy Egyptian-Syrian conflict (5-19), with focus on a vile king from the North who will bring blasphemies against Daniel's people, but who will ultimately be defeated (20-45).

POINTS TO PONDER:
* The prophetic detail of the Persian-Greek and Egyptian-Syrian conflicts
* The identity of the vile king from the North


Chapter Twelve

"The Vision of The Time of The End" concludes with assurance of ultimate victory for Daniel's people (Israel), in words suggestive of the final resurrection (1-3). Daniel is given instructions to seal the book because it concern things in the future. Asking when these things will be accomplished, he is given cryptic answers, but is reassured that he himself shall rest and rise to his inheritance at the end of the days (4-13).

POINTS TO PONDER:
* Identifying the "time of trouble" and "time of the end" in this chapter
* The instructions for Daniel to "shut up the words, and seal the book"


DID YOU KNOW?
The prophet Daniel spoke of the coming Antichrist changing “times and law” as the ruler of the world (Daniel 7:25). Such a radical transformation of societies and commerce would be an attempt to break any and all connections with religious, commercial, and legal precedents, all to be replaced by the Antichrist’s rule. This was tried during the French Revolution when, from 1793 to 1805, the French Republican (or Revolution) Calendar was instituted. There were still 12 months, but weeks were changed from seven days to 10 days. Days were 10 hours of 144 minutes each. These and many other societal and economic changes were a revolutionary attempt to cut all ties to the previous government and way of life. WOW!!!

QUESTIONS: WEEK # 2

1). How many deportations is mention of the Jews to Babylon in captivity?
2). What was Nebuchadnezzar’s first dream?
3). What did Nebuchadnezzar build that is compared to what the Beast built in Revelation?
4). What was Nebuchadnezzar’s second dream?
5). How did Nebuchadnezzar respond to Daniel’s interpretation?
6). Who was Nebuchadnezzar’s grandson?
7). Explain why Daniel was thrown in the lion’s den.
8). Explain why Daniel companion was thrown in the fiery furnace.
9). How many visions did Daniel receive during Belshazzar reign in (552 B.C.)?
10) Who are the four Beasts Daniel speaks of in (1-8).
11) Explain what Gabriel told Daniel in (9:20-27).
12) What chapters give us the details of “The Vision of the Time of the End”?
13) What agent is the vile king of the north?
14) After reading chapter 8:22 what do the horns represent?

SALVATION PRAYER:

Dear Lord Jesus,
Heavenly Father, I confess that I have sinned against You and need Your salvation. Please forgive me. I believe Jesus died for my sins and rose from the dead. I receive Jesus Christ as my Lord and Savior, fully trusting in the work He accomplished on the cross on my behalf. Thank You for saving me, accepting me, and adopting me into Your family. Guide my life and help me to do your will, and walk in close step with You, amen.

In your name, Amen:

Reading Assignment: Week # 2 Daniel 4-6 Monday-Wednesday-Friday


message 2: by Evangelist (new)

Evangelist Jordan (chosenwithcare) | 1925 comments Mod
Sharing Points:

Chapter 1
* Young Daniel's commitment to God in pagan environment:

Daniel committed himself to God by not eating what the king ordered him to eat; - He did it with politeness (he requested, not demanded); with God's help (God brought Daniel into the favor and goodwill of the chief eunuch); with persistence (rebuffed by the chief eunuch, he appealed to the steward); and with willingness to test his faith (asking for ten day trial)

* How Daniel was able to keep both his faith to God and service to the king:

Daniel trusted God and God blessed him and his friend’s physical appearance, and because of their wisdom, the king rewarded him and his friends by promoting them to a high position.

Chapter 2

* The kingdoms represented by the image in Nebuchadnezzar's dream:

The first four kingdoms have been identified as the Babylonian, Persian, Greek and Roman Empires. This identification has come from the workings of history matching further prophecies. Daniel already said that Babylon, specifically Nebuchadnezzar, was the head of gold (Daniel 2:38). Babylon fell to the kingdom of the Medes and the Persians (Daniel 5:26-31). Greece became the successor to the Medo-Persian Empire (Daniel 8:20-21; 10:20 - 11:14). The “iron” empire can only be Rome. Opinions differ on the fifth empire. Some have tried to identify various periods in Europe’s history as the clay-and-iron feet; others claim the feet represent the divided remnants of Rome before supposedly being “conquered” by Christianity. Still others believe that the clay/iron empire is yet to come: the kingdom of the Antichrist will be a “revived Roman Empire.” The last theory seems to be the best. We know, according to Revelation 17:12-13, that the Antichrist will lead a coalition of ten nations (the statue’s ten toes?). And we know that Christ will defeat the forces of the Antichrist (Revelation 17:14). After that, Jesus will set up His kingdom—the rock smashes the image—and the kingdoms of this world will “become the kingdom of our Lord and of his Christ, and he will reign for ever and ever” (Revelation 11:15).

* The kingdom which shall never be destroyed: its identity and establishment:

The kingdom of God will reach its ultimate goal when the Lord returns. “But he must reign until all his enemies have been put under his feet” (1 Corinthians 15:25). This reign began with the first coming of the Lord and the establishment of his church (Matthew 16:18-19; Colossians 1:13; Revelation 1:9).

Chapter 3
* Faith in the face of fire:

When Shadrach, Meshach, and Abednego courageously took their stand before Nebuchadnezzar, they didn't know with certainty that God would deliver them. They had no assurance they would survive the flames. But they stood firm anyway. In the face of death could you boldly declare as these three young men did: "Whether God rescues me or not, I will stand for him. I will not compromise my faith, and I will not deny my Lord." (Daniel 3:1-30)

* The fourth person in the fiery furnace (angel or Christ?):

Who was the fourth man? I believe it was the Lord Jesus Christ himself. This is an Old Testament appearance of the Son of God coming down from heaven in bodily form. He stepped across the battlements of heaven, walked down the starry staircase, walked into the blazing furnace and said to the flames, "Cool it!" And they did. That made it very comfortable for Shadrach, Meshach, and Abednego. I am struck by the fact that the Lord Jesus appears at only one place in this chapter. Where is Jesus in Daniel 3? He is in the furnace waiting for the young men. You can do the math yourself. Outside there were three, inside there were four, and outside there were three again. Jesus never manifests himself except inside the furnace, at the very moment when he was needed the most. What a lesson this is for all of us. So often we go through life for days and weeks without any consciousness of the Lord's presence with us. But when trouble comes, when the flames lick at our feet, when life tumbles in around us, then we discover that Jesus has been by our side the entire time. It is in the fires of life that we experience the presence of Christ most powerfully. He is always there, but he makes himself known in the fiery furnace.


message 3: by Evangelist (new)

Evangelist Jordan (chosenwithcare) | 1925 comments Mod
ANSWERS TO QUESTIONS: WEEK # 2



1). How many deportations is mention of the Jews to Babylon in captivity?
There is three deportations recorded in (1) (Daniel 1:1-14) (2) (Ezekiel 1:1-3) (3) Jeremiah 39:11-14; 40:1-6).

2). What was Nebuchadnezzar’s first dream?
The dream featured a huge, glorious statue of a man. Its head was “made of pure gold, its chest and arms of silver, its belly and thighs of bronze, its legs of iron, its feet partly of iron and partly of baked clay” (Daniel 2:32-33). Then a rock cut “not by human hands” (Daniel 2:34) hit the foot of the statue, and the whole image “became like chaff on a threshing floor,” while the rock “became a huge mountain and filled the whole earth” (Daniel 2:35). This vision, by the way, gives us our modern idiom “feet of clay,” meaning “a hidden fault or weakness.” Daniel’s interpretation, given to him by God, explains that the statue represents a series of kingdoms, each less glorious than the one before, as indicated by the decreasing value of the metals. Daniel identifies Nebuchadnezzar as the head of gold, stating that God had given Nebuchadnezzar much power (Daniel 2:37-38). The next kingdom to arise will be inferior to Babylon, as will the next. “Finally, there will come a fourth kingdom, strong as iron. . . . It will crush and break all the others” (Daniel 2:40). Finally, the feet of mixed clay and iron “will be a divided kingdom” (Daniel 2:41). During the time of this final world empire, the “rock” will smash them all to bits, a prediction that “God . . . will set up a kingdom that will never be destroyed” (Daniel 2:44). All previous earthly kingdoms will be brought to an end.

3). What did Nebuchadnezzar build that is compared to what the Beast built in Revelation?
He built a large image of gold demanding all to worship it (Daniel 3:1-7)

4). What was Nebuchadnezzar’s second dream?
This dream is about a great tree that fills the earth and then is cut down but its trunk left intact, followed by a man whose heart is changed and becomes like an animal (4:1-18). Daniel interprets the dream as applying to the king that he might know that God rules in the kingdoms of men (vv. 19-27).

5). How did Nebuchadnezzar respond to Daniel’s interpretation?
He first responded with pride and ambition, than a year later the dream was fulfilled, and Nebuchadnezzar heart was changed and he praised, blessed and honored the Most High God, the King of heaven (vv. 28-37).

6). Who was Nebuchadnezzar’s grandson?
King Belshazzar was the grandson of Nebuchadnezzar.

7). Explain why Daniel was thrown in the lion’s den.
Daniel is raised to high office by his royal master Darius the Mede, but jealous rivals trick Darius into issuing a decree which condemns Daniel to death. Hoping for Daniel's deliverance, but unable to save him, the king has him cast into the pit of lions. At daybreak he hurries back, asking if God had saved his friend. Daniel replies that God had sent an angel to close up the jaws of the lions, "because I was found blameless before him." The king has those who had conspired against Daniel, and their wives and children, thrown to the lions in his place, and commands to all the people of the whole world to "tremble and fear before the God of Daniel." Also Daniel prayed three times a day to God against the king’s decree.

8). Explain why Daniel’s companion was thrown in the fiery furnace.
Shadrach, Meshach and Abednego (Hebrew: Hanania, Mishael and Azaria) were three young men from Jerusalem condemned to death in a fiery furnace by Nebuchadnezzar, king of Babylon, when they refused to bow down to an image of him, and worship any god but the God of Israel. According to the Book of Daniel, they were saved by the angel of God and promoted to high office.
9). How many visions did Daniel receive during Belshazzar reign in (552 B.C.)?
Daniel received two visions; The first is of four beasts from the sea (1-8). The second involves a judgment by the Ancient of Days, and the coronation of the Son of Man (9-14). The interpretation describes persecution by elements of the fourth beast (kingdom), with ultimate victory by the saints of the Most High (15-28).

10). Who are the four beasts Daniel speaks of in (1-8).
The Babylonian Empire, The Medio-Persion Empire, The Greek Empire, and The Roman Empire

11). Explain what Gabriel told Daniel in (9:20-27).
This vision is about a swift goat defeating a mighty ram. The goat's large horn is then broken into four horns, followed by a little horn that brings desolation to the sanctuary and the host of heaven. The angel Gabriel interprets the vision which foretells the rise of a fierce and mighty king (Antiochus IV Epiphanes, 175-164 B.C.) that would bring desolation against the holy people.

12). What chapters give us the details of “The Vision of the Time of the End”?
Chapter ten give us the vision of the time of the end.

13). What agent is the vile king of the north?
The false prophet of the end times is described in Revelation 13:11-15. He is also referred to as the “second beast” (Revelation 16:13, 19:20, 20:10). Together with the Antichrist and Satan, who empowers both of them, the false prophet is the third party in the unholy trinity.

14). After reading chapter 8:22 what do the horns represent?
The horns represent the earthly kingdoms that was to come in the future; these kingdoms was Medo-Persia, Greece, and Rome.


Reading Assignment: Week # 2 Daniel 4-6 Monday-Wednesday-Friday


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