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Book Club 2015 > October 2015 Nominations

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message 1: by Betsy, co-mod (new)

Betsy | 1789 comments Mod
Please post a comment below to nominate a book for the group to read for October 2015.

Please use the "add book/author" link just above the comment box to insert a link to the Goodreads book page for the book you are nominating, so other members can more easily assess it.

You may nominate a book which has been suggested previously and did not win.

Please do not nominate a book which is unlikely to be available to all members, such as one which was just published within the last three months or which is only available for Kindle in the U.S.

Nominations will close on August 20 or when we have about 10 good nominations, whichever occurs first.


message 2: by Paul (new)

Paul  Perry (pezski) | 40 comments I'll nominate SuperSense: Why We Believe in the Unbelievable by Bruce M. Hood. bought this and another of his books after seeing his presentation (and meeting him in the bar) at QED in Manchester last year. Looks fascinating.


message 3: by Kris (last edited Aug 15, 2015 02:46AM) (new)

Kris Worsley | 1 comments This looks like a very interesting read , Paul- I think I'll read it anyway. Thanks for the recommendation!!


message 4: by Jim (new)

Jim (jimmaclachlan) | 698 comments I'll nominate Being Mortal: Medicine and What Matters in the End by Atul Gawande again. Gawande tackles medicine at the end of life, something which is completely screwed up in this country, IMO. We're going to die. Many times modern medicine hastens the process &/or makes it far more horrific than it should be for no other reason than we don't know enough to ask the proper questions. He covers the history of nursing homes & the alternatives. He also discusses his father's death from cancer which was a real eye-opener to me.

I gave the book 5 stars & would love to re-read it with the group & discuss it. I'm sure the crowd here would have a lot to add.


message 5: by Katy (new)

Katy (kathy_h) | 174 comments I'll nominate Bird Sense: What It's Like to Be a Bird by Tim Birkhead.

Most people would love to be able to fly like a bird, but few of us are aware of the other sensations that make being a bird a gloriously unique experience. What is going on inside the head of a nightingale as it sings, and how does its brain improvise? How do desert birds detect rain hundreds of kilometers away? How do birds navigate by using an innate magnetic compass?

Tracing the history of how our knowledge about birds has grown, particularly through advances in technology over the past fifty years, Bird Sense tells captivating stories about how birds interact with one another and their environment. More advanced testing methods have debunked previously held beliefs, such as female starlings selecting mates based on how symmetrical the male's plumage markings are. (Whereas females can discern the difference between symmetrical and asymmetrical markings, they are not very good at detecting small differences among symmetrically marked males!)

Never before has there been a popular book about how intricately bird behavior is shaped by birds' senses. A lifetime spent studying birds has provided Tim Birkhead with a wealth of fieldwork experiences, insights, and a unique understanding of birds, all firmly grounded in science. No one who reads Bird Sense can fail to be dazzled by it.


message 7: by Kikyosan (new)

Kikyosan | 64 comments wow kathy. i want to read it!


message 8: by Katy (new)

Katy (kathy_h) | 174 comments Kikyosan wrote: "wow kathy. i want to read it!"

Cool. Looked like something really interesting and quite different from what we have been reading.


message 9: by Steve (new)

Steve Van Slyke (steve_van_slyke) | 379 comments Merchants of Doubt: How a Handful of Scientists Obscured the Truth on Issues from Tobacco Smoke to Global Warming was recently featured in Catalyst, the quarterly of the Union of Concerned Scientists. It seems worthy of a nomination.


message 10: by Betsy, co-mod (last edited Aug 15, 2015 08:05PM) (new)

Betsy | 1789 comments Mod
Steve wrote: "Merchants of Doubt: How a Handful of Scientists Obscured the Truth on Issues from Tobacco Smoke to Global Warming was recently featured in Catalyst, the quarterly of the Union of Con..."

We read this book in July 2011. I can't find the discussion thread, but this link will show you what some of our members thought.

ETA: Found the discussion thread:
https://www.goodreads.com/topic/show/...


message 11: by Betsy, co-mod (new)

Betsy | 1789 comments Mod
Only four nominations?


message 12: by Steve (new)


message 13: by Betsy, co-mod (new)

Betsy | 1789 comments Mod
No, we haven't.


message 14: by Bigollo (last edited Aug 18, 2015 02:54PM) (new)

Bigollo | 23 comments Black Holes & Time Warps: Einstein's Outrageous LegacyBlack Holes & Time Warps: Einstein's Outrageous LegacyI bought this book a while ago, yet never read it, something always in the way.. Maybe if there are more people wanting to read it then i will too?..

https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/1...


message 15: by Greta (new)

Greta Fisher (bougenviilea) | 19 comments Bigollo wrote: "Black Holes & Time Warps: Einstein's Outrageous LegacyBlack Holes & Time Warps: Einstein's Outrageous LegacyI bought this book a while ago, yet never read it, something al..."

It's been 100 years since Einstein published his general theory. Can this book be read by non-mathematicians or is there another work that accomplishes this? Something by Steven Hawkins perhaps?


message 16: by Bigollo (last edited Aug 19, 2015 03:23PM) (new)

Bigollo | 23 comments Greta wrote: " It's been 100 years since Einstein published his general theory. Can this book be read by non-mathematicians or is there another work that accomplishes this? Something by Steven Hawkins perhaps? "

I haven't read the book yet. But it's definitely written for large public. I've just browsed it and haven't seen a single formula. A lot of pics though: photos, drawings, diagrams. It looks there's a lot of pages on the history of the subject.
It still may be not an easy read. I am going to give it a try anyway - It's been sitting on my shelf for too long. The foreword was written by Steven Hawking, btw.
Maybe somebody in the group has read the book?


message 17: by Greta (new)

Greta Fisher (bougenviilea) | 19 comments Kathy wrote: "I'll nominate Bird Sense: What It's Like to Be a Bird by Tim Birkhead.

Most people would love to be able to fly like a bird, but few of us are aware of the other se..."

I will read this book wether it "wins" or not.
We have a little parrot with a tiny head and a huge personality. Whenever my husband comes home she will start to squawk before the dog barks and before I hear the car.


message 18: by Kikyosan (new)

Kikyosan | 64 comments I nominate The Double Helix
I find it interesting not only because it talks about a fundamental discovery, but it is a valid hint to talk about scientists, scientific research, genuine competition, women in science.
It is very short and easy to read, not demanding but exciting.

PS: May I ask if it is possible to create a locked and sticky thread with a list of every books chosen until now (books that won)? I know it is possible to scan them in the polls, but it is quite confusing. It's just a suggestion :)


message 19: by Kikyosan (new)

Kikyosan | 64 comments Greta wrote: "Kathy wrote: "I'll nominate Bird Sense: What It's Like to Be a Bird by Tim Birkhead"
I will read this book wether it "wins" or not. "


Yes I will read it all the same. I've studied some interesting things about this topic and I'd like to read something more. I've read the author is an "old" ornithologist so it should be reliable and not banal, but I didn't check his scientific reputation yet.


message 20: by Betsy, co-mod (new)

Betsy | 1789 comments Mod
Kikyosan wrote: "May I ask if it is possible to create a locked and sticky thread with a list of every books chosen until now (books that won)? I know it is possible to scan them in the polls, but it is quite confusing."

If you go our group Bookshelves (on the menu at the top right of every page of the group), then select the Book Club shelf, that will give you a list of all the books the group has chosen to read as a group, since it's beginning. You should be able to sort any way you want, but the title sort doesn't work properly. Here's the link to the list, sorted by read date:

https://www.goodreads.com/group/books...


message 21: by Betsy, co-mod (new)

Betsy | 1789 comments Mod
Nominations have been closed. Since we only had 7 nominations, I added one that had been a fairly high runner up in previous polls.

Please vote for your preference at the following poll:

https://www.goodreads.com/poll/show/1...


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