Sci-fi and Heroic Fantasy discussion

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General SF&F Chat > Who the Frack are these people...and just who do they think they are???

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message 1: by [deleted user] (new)

Had to go a couple of towns over yesterday, so naturaly I hit the bookstores...for me that means the used book stores, as you all know by now I like the old stuff that's out-of-print...after I was done, and my mundane errands run, I still had some time on my hands, so I went to the Barnes & Noble to see what's was what...the SF section seriously upset me...of course they had about 10 different editions of Lord of the Rings, tons of George R R's books, a whole bookcase of Star Wars paperbacks, a few (very few) Asimov and RAH...and tons and tons of stuff by people I have NEVER heard of before, NONE of it looked the least bit interesting. I admit to a rather violent reaction...just who the heck ARE these people and who do they think they are clogging up the shelves with JUNK??? Who died and gave them permission to write SF?? And just who are these idiot publishers printing this stuff instead of keeping the old classics, the TRUE Holy Writ, in print??

Just what happened to the world?? I am starting to understand why the old sometimes just give up, lay down, and die....


message 2: by Michael (new)

Michael | 28 comments I just try to stay tolerant and understand everyone has different tastes.


message 3: by D.M. (new)

D.M. Pruden | 7 comments An interesting point of view, Spooky1947. While I too enjoy and respect most of the classic SF authors, as an aspiring author myself, I am gratified that room is being made for other authors. Perhaps, with luck, some of my "junk" may be on the shelves to annoy you someday ;-)

My own thoughts are, while reprints of classic works are a good read, SF is a big enough pond that we can't possibly explore all of the story ideas through just a few authors. Even the Giants all published a first book.

Just my $0.02 worth ( though since we've done away with the penny in Canada, I need to round it up to $0.05)


message 4: by V.W. (new)

V.W. Singer | 253 comments The real problem is that what people define as SF is shifting or deliberately being shifted or co-opted. Rather than grand visions, technical puzzles, wondrous new civilizations and creatures, we get "character based" stories and romances, which while being perfectly good novels, could be based in today's world or even in the past without really being affected. To me, it isn't SF if you can take out the SF and still have a coherent book.


message 5: by [deleted user] (new)

Jim wrote: "why 2 of the same topic?"

Because Spooky lives life in stereo?
(Duplicate topic was removed.)


message 6: by [deleted user] (new)

Spooky1947 wrote: "I admit to a rather violent reaction... ..."

I have this vision of Spooky rampaging down the bookstore aisles, scattering paperbacks and overturning shelves... Hulk smash! :)

Of course, in Spooky's case, "people I have NEVER heard of before, NONE of it looked the least bit interesting," refers to anything published since 1960. :)


message 7: by J.D. (new)

J.D. Hallowell | 75 comments The answer to "Who ARE these people?" is partly "Authors whose publishers paid to get them shelf space."

We'd all like to think that booksellers like B&N carefully select the titles they'll carry based on a deep appreciation of our beloved genre, but that's not how it usually works.


message 8: by Christy (new)

Christy Scarborough | 39 comments Agreed, Spooky--especially the huge amount of vampire books and Hunger Games copies--the true hard core sci-fi (as in space, aliens, etc) is getting harder and harder to find.


message 9: by D.M. (new)

D.M. Pruden | 7 comments Actually, I agree with your take on vampire books, & Hunger Games clones. I am also put off by the number of loosely disguised porn books about shape shifting bears and the like that litter Amazon's SF listings as well. Good, old fashioned hard SF is a rare beast. Perhaps a commentary on the growing degree of scientific illiteracy in the modern age. I once had a short story rejected for the reason that the editor couldn't get his head around the fact that I had used some exponential notation to designate the size of an object. Pretty pathetic state when science fiction is deemed too hard on that kind of basis.


message 10: by J.D. (new)

J.D. Hallowell | 75 comments Doug wrote: "Actually, I agree with your take on vampire books, & Hunger Games clones. I am also put off by the number of loosely disguised porn books about shape shifting bears and the like that litter Amazon..."

Amazon really needs to figure out that "Paranormal Romance" is its own high-level category.


message 11: by Kyra (new)

Kyra Halland (kyrahalland) | 24 comments The big publishers seem to like "message" SF that's more about social issues than science, and also the red-hot paranormal urban fantasy romance genre. You can find more traditional SF from smaller publishers (like Baen), and if you're open to reading indie authors, you can find a lot of old fashioned space opera and hard SF there, too.


message 12: by [deleted user] (new)

Don't get me started on Paranormal Romance...the local library is tied into the state-wide e-book collection...some big dummy up at State seems to think para romance IS SF, and ONLY para romance is Sf.....I've offered to help, offered cash to buy some REAL Sf for the collection...they weren't interested of course...

Publishers just don't seem to have much intrest in keeping a backlist in print...at least if they do, copies don't make it down here...sigh...


message 13: by [deleted user] (new)

Sorry about the double topic G33, one thing I've noticed about posting on Goodreads, I'll post a topic, blow off the steam, then forget about it until I get all upset about the same thing all over again...how many times have you had to deleate my double topics now? At least as many times as you've had to remind me about the "no cussin' " rule......

:D


message 14: by Kyra (new)

Kyra Halland (kyrahalland) | 24 comments Spooky1947 wrote: "Publishers just don't seem to have much intrest in keeping a backlist in print...at least if they do, copies don't make it down here...sigh... "

Publishers are mainly interested in what will make the quarterly statements look good to the people at conglomerate headquarters.


message 15: by BR (new)

BR Kingsolver (brkingsolver) | 10 comments Amazon doesn't seem to get the difference between sci-fi and fantasy. Admitted, there is some cross over, but urban fantasy and PNR are usually not what I would consider sci-fi.


message 16: by Michael (last edited Aug 16, 2015 08:31AM) (new)

Michael | 28 comments B.R. wrote: "Amazon doesn't seem to get the difference between sci-fi and fantasy. Admitted, there is some cross over, but urban fantasy and PNR are usually not what I would consider sci-fi."

After reading 100s of science fiction and fantasy books, I see the line as pretty muddled these days.

If ASOIAF ends by Jaime Lannister, Cersei, Little Finger, and Varys (the only 4 that survive The Others invasion) going north of the wall to discover that Bran Stark is actually inside a crashed spaceship using telepathy to communicate to everyone through weir trees (which are running some version of ISO/IEC 7498-1), I don't think it's fantasy anymore (even after a million words).


message 17: by [deleted user] (new)

I'm not sure who said this (I want to say it was Campbell, but I honestly can't rember for sure), "people SAY they like SF, but they really like fantasy"...something like that...Campbell is rembered in the SF world as the man who edited Astounding and presided over the Golden Age of SF...among the "other" fans of the old pulp magazines (meaning those not 'just' SF fans) Campbell is rembered as editor of Unknown Worlds, the greatest fantasy magazine ever...keep in mind he edited hundreds of issues of Astounding (later name changed to Analog) and Unknown Worlds only lasted 39 issues (the magazine was killed by wartime paper shortages, NOT low sales)...true, when it comes to fantasy and SF can be hard to seprate the two, when you are dealing with mundanes (non-fans) it's impossalbe....that's no excuse, a bookstore owner should know his stuff, or take up some other line of work...I still feel like going back there and chaseing the money-changers out of the temple...

IF I had the cash, and IF people around here actualy read books, and IF there were any SF fans around here, I'd open my own bookstore, call it Skylark Books, carry nothing but F&SF....and when the little old blue-haired ladys walked in asking where I kept the romance titles, I'd chase them right out


message 18: by [deleted user] (new)

I should add this to the mix...it's not just that I'm getting to be a old man, and thus a creeky old fan...I rember when I was the Golden Age of 12 I looked down my nose at authors who got their start in the 50s as Johnny-come-latelys...I would pass by books by Ellison, Silverberg, Niven, and PKD as being "by those new guys, too bad they can't write worth spit"....as G33 will tell you I have mellowed in my old age....now days, I only turn my nose up at authors that got started in the 1960s and after.....


message 19: by [deleted user] (new)

keep in mind, I was born in 1965....


message 20: by April (new)

April | 38 comments Speaking of sci-fi, I'm not really loving the sound of either of the upcoming books of the month for late August/September. Both have fairly low reviews on Goodreads and Amazon. Now, in my defense, I usually read both the critical reviews and the positive reviews and go from there. The critical reviews on both are making me feel a little iffy because what reviewers don't like is well-articulated. I don't want to sit out the month, but I wonder which you folks are leaning toward if you choose only one of the two?


message 21: by J.D. (new)

J.D. Hallowell | 75 comments Spooky1947 wrote: "keep in mind, I was born in 1965...."

Whippersnapper.


message 22: by Dee (new)

Dee (hatcherdee) | 12 comments Hey!! I do not have blue hair and I'm not little, but my son was born in 1965, so I'm definitely OLD. I like the old stuff too, Spooky, but I like to try new authors once in a while and every once in a while I find a new voice that really excites me and I can't wait for another book to come out in a series. I can't spend the rest of my life re-reading stuff. I agree about all the vampire books and paranormal stuff. I read it, sometimes a lot of it, but my true favorites are all hard science fiction with an emphasis on the science. Used to subscribe to Analog and Fantasy and Science Fiction and haunted the mailbox until they arrived each month.


message 23: by V.W. (new)

V.W. Singer | 253 comments The spring went out of my chicken a long time ago. These days, it seems that the only "new" SF writers I like get published by BAEN, such as Charles E. Gannon and Mike Kupari.


message 24: by V.W. (new)

V.W. Singer | 253 comments Perhaps this would be a good guide to new readers looking for more serious SF writers?

http://www.sigmaforum.org/


message 25: by [deleted user] (new)

with the upmost respect V.W., Sigma ain't my thing...the last time I heard of a bunch of SF authors giving advice to 'ol Unkle Sam, we got the Star Wars program...not SF's finest hour me thinks....Ronald RayGuns got all excited about the first part of the report (the part about the missle shield) and quietly dumped the second part (about pumping up the space program...moon bases, humans on Mars, mineing the astroids) into the garbage can...just like something RAH would be mixed up in....SF authors giving the government advice is like tossing pearls before swine...politicos of both parties know nothing about science, care nothing about science, and have no vision beyond the next election


message 26: by [deleted user] (new)

J.D., I may be a whippersnapper in body, but in my heart I carry the warm glow of First Fandom...

:-P


message 27: by V.W. (new)

V.W. Singer | 253 comments Spooky1947 wrote: "with the upmost respect V.W., Sigma ain't my thing...the last time I heard of a bunch of SF authors giving advice to 'ol Unkle Sam, we got the Star Wars program...not SF's finest hour me thinks......."

I wasn't promoting Sigma, merely suggesting that the authors involved could at least explain the "science" in their science fiction.


message 28: by [deleted user] (new)

Dee, i DO read some of the newer stuff every now and again, but my heart lies with those old classics I was always faunching for when I was a kid, and could never find...maybe if i had read them when I was a kid I might have gotten it all out of my system...in that case I would have gone one of two ways...become a 'normal' fan, totally happy with the 'new stuff', or I would have had my Sense of Wonder satied, turned to the Real World, and become just another of the sad mundane masses


message 29: by Nefeli (new)

Nefeli (galacticon) | 16 comments In the bookstore I usually go to, about one fourth of the sci-fi/fantasy area is full of paranormal romances and vampire books... Yes it's very annoying so I have to ignore these to find the actual sci-fi. But science fiction as a genre wouldn't progress if only the classics were being sold, so publishers have to give opportunities to new authors. Some of the new stuff is actually very good, for example The Martian by Andy Weir.


message 30: by April (last edited Aug 17, 2015 04:43PM) (new)

April | 38 comments I want to read "The Martian."


message 31: by Debbie's Spurts (D.A.) (last edited Aug 17, 2015 05:48PM) (new)

Debbie's Spurts (D.A.) | 1 comments I really wish the paranormal and urban fantasy books would just get their own sections. (And I do read some--just don't think they belong with SF or fantasy even when doing some Hunger Games dystopian or near future setting.)

It's eye opening and stomach churning what crap passes for some bestselling genres nowadays. If SF is bestselling and author has trouble getting published or sales--just changes a character or race to be aliens with some ray guns and transporters/spaceships. PNR bestselling, well, heck, shove in some werewolves and vampires instead of aliens. Angst-y love triangle romance or YA romance going nowhere -- mention a dystopian setting removing a lot of adults and putting legs of triangle in factions or make legs of triangle different supernatural races... You can almost see where author search/replaced or cut/pasted ...

Lately I've been seeing online retail (Amazon, Barnes and Noble, etc.) listing SF&F books as steampunk for criminy's sake. Like they had any costumes, settings or themes remotely resembling American Wild West or Victorian England or steam-engine/clockwork things. Alternate history of pre-revolutionary war gets called steampunk ...

Goodreads just recommended a bunch of actual steampunk books to me because I read The Deed of Paksenarrion which, while amazing, really is very traditional, formulaic fantasy.

I'm not an SF purist or someone who thinks anything published after the 1960s doesn't belong or anything. But enough with the romances, crime/law-enforcement, steampunk, and fated-mate-porn being put in SF section because include supernatural races or are set in some too-vague-to-equal-futuristic-worldbuilding dystopian setting. Sure, there is some crossover and not everyone will agree what is SF&F but there does need to be a separate (even if adjacent) section for PNR/UF and SF&F.

Think it's bad in SF section of Barnes and Noble? Take a little walk over to the YA/Teen section.


message 32: by Bobby (last edited Aug 17, 2015 06:57PM) (new)

Bobby Bermea (beirutwedding) | 412 comments Spooky1947 wrote: "Had to go a couple of towns over yesterday, so naturaly I hit the bookstores...for me that means the used book stores, as you all know by now I like the old stuff that's out-of-print...after I was ..."

I don't know, Spooks. This sounds like it's more about you than the new authors. Or the city where you live. We have great bookstores in Portland and I've found great speculative fiction authors recently, Paolo Bacigalupi, Nalo Hopkinson, China Miévilleand Jim Butcher to name a very few. Thank god the old guys are getting moved out of the way. They're old. They're not supposed to hold sway forever. My guess is they'd agree. Especially Heinlein.

Everything is change, bro.


message 33: by [deleted user] (new)

Bobby, Bobby, Bobby....true part of it IS me....I just like That Old-Time Science Fiction, and it's darn hard to find unless you steal it off the internet (I'd rather buy than steal, but if I can't find it I'm happy to steal it)...I live in the back-waters of Dixie and half these folks can't even read, much less read SF (or know the first thing about it)...now when I hit the road, like when I was visiting my Mom earlier this year, I can find a good bit of the Holy Writ...Bradbury, RAH, Asimov, ect, but not around here...sure I can order off Amazon and Abe Books and e-Bay, but I HATE buying books sight unseen...I rember those wonderful years as a kid, when you could find paperback reprints of the old Masters on the rack of most any department store...not all the good stuff mind ya, but a lot of it...walk into a dept. store now and see the trash on the rack...Duck Dynasty and such rot, maybe a Start Trek novel IF your lucky...then I goto a real bookstore and I see...nothing...the publishers keep the mundane classic LitCrap in constant print...why can't OUR classics stay in print??? I could name a good dozen that should NEVER go out of print...I've never seen some of them IN print...and I matain if Heinlein were around today, he would bring the roof of the temple down...Para Romance indeed.....

Yep, a lot of it is me and where I'm living...a very long story, but I'm sort of stuck here...my frustration over having a hard time finding the books I want/'need' has been life-long, and now that I'm in my old age I just don't hold my temper as well as I use too....

I DO belive the new kids should have their shot, but that doesn't mean they can choke out the Old Masters with junk either...


message 34: by [deleted user] (new)

another reason I got a mad going...I had to miss the Really Big, Really Cheap, Really Good booksale this year up in SC...first year I've missed in a long time, I missed seeing the folk I only see there (like the Cookbook Lady and they guy that looks JUST LIKE Asimov), I missed snagging bags of good SF, and I missed trying to get my $30 entrance fee back at the free open bar....


message 35: by Bobby (last edited Aug 17, 2015 08:16PM) (new)

Bobby Bermea (beirutwedding) | 412 comments Spooky1947 wrote: "Bobby, Bobby, Bobby....true part of it IS me....I just like That Old-Time Science Fiction, and it's darn hard to find unless you steal it off the internet (I'd rather buy than steal, but if I can't..."

You know what I recommend, Spooky? You should plan a visit out to Portland, Oregon. I'm serious. Between my lady and I we have two two bedroom apartments. Come out here for like a week and I'll take you to a handful of the best bookstores you'll ever go to. I've even got one, right down the street, that is just a house and is neck deep, sometimes literally, in books. The science fiction section has crates full of books overflowing and shelves buried three rows deep of paperbacks. There's also Powell's: City of Books. One book store that takes up an entire city block and is four stories high or something. All books, bro, new and used. I'm not kidding. PLENTY of the Old Masters. And if you did that and found some loot that made you happy, we could head down to the Sylvia Beach Hotel, overlooking the ocean, and read up in the attic/library. This hotel, no cell phones, no wi-fi, no TV and all the rooms are themed after authors. Think about it.

And you're absolutely right, dog and I didn't mean to say that. I love Heinlein, Bradbury, Clarke, Asimov the whole shebang.

That's a real offer, bro. Let me know.


message 36: by Nefeli (new)

Nefeli (galacticon) | 16 comments In my favourite bookstore the SF/F section has a ton of classics like Asimov, Bradburry, H.G. Wells... But it also has a lot of new authors... In most bookstores there are a lot of sci fi classics you just might have to spend some extra time to find them among the paranormal romances... Which might be indeed annoying but still they are there.


message 37: by April (new)

April | 38 comments We don't have any good used bookstores in my little southern suburb. (Matter fact, we don't have ANY modern bookstores here period!) There's a tiny one a few miles away that I tried years ago, but the sheer volume of Harlequin-style romance books made me want to run screaming from the store. Last time I found a good used source was....Athens, GA circa late 1990s.


message 38: by Nefeli (new)

Nefeli (galacticon) | 16 comments April I totally get you, in my town there's only one small bookstore which has mainly romances so the bookstore I buy my books from is in another city at least 1 and a half hour away by car, but thankfully I go there often...


message 39: by [deleted user] (last edited Aug 18, 2015 08:19AM) (new)

D.A.-tell me if there's a love triangle or drama w/ book wrote: "It's eye opening and stomach churning what crap passes for some bestselling genres nowadays...."

Looking at the current New York Times best seller lists, in Hardcover I see three genre books: The latest Dark-Hunter book from Sherrilyn Kenyon (#16 in the series;) The latest Kate Daniels from Ilona Andrews (#8 in the series); and Armada by Ernest Cline. So two UFs and one really bad space opera. Under total print + ebooks, the Dark-Hunter and Kate Daniels series reprise plus The Martian by Weir.

So, UF is popular.


D.A.-tell me if there's a love triangle or drama w/ book wrote: "I really wish the paranormal and urban fantasy books would just get their own sections...."

And then we can have a big argument about the exact definition of Urban Fantasy.

I find a lot of SF/F fans are fine with Neil Gaiman's & Jim Butcher's UF.


D.A.-tell me if there's a love triangle or drama w/ book wrote: "But enough with the romances, crime/law-enforcement, steampunk, and fated-mate-porn ..."

I could argue that ERB's Barsoom/John Carter or Caspak/Land that Time Forgot series are romance. I could argue that Asimov's robot novels & collections are all crime/law enforcement. Jules Vern is the original steam punk. Can I argue Wheel of Time is fated-mate-porn? Sure! :)

Time travel, cyberpunk, biotech, steampunk, apocalypse, dystopia, space opera, climate, AI, alien invasion, hard SF, military SF, first contact, new invention, humor, superhero, alternate history... Which sub-sub-genre do we keep in the "real science fiction" section?


message 40: by Bobby (new)

Bobby Bermea (beirutwedding) | 412 comments Like that, for instance. Urban fantasy as a genre was absolutely necessary. Fantasy couldn't stay in the Middle Earth knock-offs forever.


message 41: by Debbie's Spurts (D.A.) (last edited Aug 18, 2015 04:12PM) (new)

Debbie's Spurts (D.A.) | 1 comments G33z3r wrote: "Jules Vern is the original steam punk..."

Of course Verne is steampunk--most books from that era are because that was the steampunk era defining the entire genre. I'm not saying steampunk isn't science fiction. But, just because steampunk is a part of science fiction genre (and currently selling well) is no excuse for retailers (off and online) to categorize every recent science fiction and fantasy book as steampunk. I even saw Star Trek books classified as steampunk (and I don't mean ones with holodeck or visited worlds where there were steampunk elements).

Of course there are crossovers and books with elements of several genres/subgenres.

I certainly have nothing against the newer authors or against their different interpretations of SF. Times are hard for bookstores; I expect them to carry popular and recent books over books published decades ago -- that's just business sense as sad as it is for fans of those books and for readers who might discover. I like finding new SF books to read; I want to read more than just re-reading older classic ones.

But once you carry a subgenre or crossovers in such quantities they can overwhelm an entire section/genre, it's past time to give them their own section. If store carries, for example, 3,235 werewolf/vampire/supernatural novels and 75 space opera and classic science fiction novels -- why not name the section for the supernatural novels and group the 75 books in another section?

Why online am I supposed to know to click on "new release steampunk" novels to browse for a new book by a favorite author in a favorite series about building a new space station? Why can't I see that space station book in "new release science fiction"?

Why if I click on "science fiction", subgenre "space travel", am I still scrolling thru dozens of pages of vampire and werewolf books all set on Earth in contemporary settings with no whiff of space travel? What the heck is steampunk about a modern day police officer investigating a murder in a large metro area discovering there are shapeshifters who are living a modern life in contemporary clothing and surroundings?

ETA: I never said alternate history wasn't science fiction. I said an alternate history of America before the revolution (the 17th century to be exact with puritans and no clockwork or steam powered anythings) wasn't steampunk.


message 42: by Michael (new)

Michael | 28 comments Personally I think both science fiction and fantasy are in a Golden Age. Oh, and I'm older than you too, spooky1947!


message 43: by [deleted user] (new)

G33 sez....

"Time travel, cyberpunk, biotech, steampunk, apocalypse, dystopia, space opera, climate, AI, alien invasion, hard SF, military SF, first contact, new invention, humor, superhero, alternate history... Which sub-sub-genre do we keep in the "real science fiction" section?"

Spooky sez:

everything pre-new-wave goes into the Real SF section...the other SF goes into the "Other SF" section...

talk about a soft-ball question...

:D :D :D


message 44: by [deleted user] (new)

Michael, we can't be in a Golden Age...Campbell is dead


message 45: by Brendan (last edited Aug 18, 2015 05:47PM) (new)

Brendan (mistershine) | 743 comments I applaud Spooky's masterful performance roleplaying a time traveler from the 1930s.


message 46: by [deleted user] (new)

Bobby, my new best friend

:D

I've heard of Powell's...isn't it the largest used bookstore in the nation?

I'll talk to about this by PM...

And thanks for the offer :D


message 47: by Jim (new)

Jim (jimmaclachlan) | 2177 comments While I'll acknowledge the genre's debt to Campbell & the old pulps, I hardly think they're the end-all-be-all. Most of my favorite SF was written by New Wave authors like Zelazny. SF is still alive, well, & growing, thankfully. Otherwise, it couldn't stay relevant. Gibson didn't coin the term cyberspace until the early 80's. Couldn't live without that today.

For fun, read one of Campbell's Morey, Arcot, & Wade trilogy such as The Black Star Passes & then read Star Smashers of the Galaxy Rangers by Harry Harrison. It's a hoot. Harrison thought Campbell's insistence on WASP male supremacy over all races & aliens got old, so he poked fun at it. Did a good job, too.


message 48: by Bobby (new)

Bobby Bermea (beirutwedding) | 412 comments Spooky1947 wrote: "Bobby, my new best friend

:D

I've heard of Powell's...isn't it the largest used bookstore in the nation?

I'll talk to about this by PM...

And thanks for the offer :D"


I actually don't know if Powell's is the biggest book store in the nation. It is, however, BIG. New and used stuff, HUGE spec fic section, really dangerous to go there unless you have money to burn. For some people Powell's is almost too big, in which case they have a smaller store up on Hawthorne. But I think for what you want, like I said, there's Wallace Books down the street, that's like the bookstores my parents used to drop me off in and come back four hours later. Or Cameron Books downtown, dusty, stacked with old editions from bygone decades. It's really fun to hit these up on a rainy day when you have nothing else to do.


message 49: by Natalie (new)

Natalie (haveah) | 123 comments D.A.-tell me if there's a love triangle or drama w/ book wrote: "I really wish the paranormal and urban fantasy books would just get their own sections. (And I do read some--just don't think they belong with SF or fantasy even when doing some Hunger Games dystopian or near future setting.)"

Not all of it is bad. And quite honestly- if they separate them- I would never read them. I don't mind romance with my scifi, or romance with my fantasy, but if there was a separate section for them? I'd never go over and look at any of them. As a matter of fact- some of my favorite fantasy books are mis-labeled Romance at B&N. I was looking for the next book in the series and had to ask a clerk. She looked it up and it was shelved in Romance. Yes they have a little romance IN them, but that's not the primary vein, so they SHOULD be in SciFi/Fantasy. It never would have occurred to me to go look in Romance.


message 50: by Jim (new)

Jim (jimmaclachlan) | 2177 comments My first Anne McCaffrey novel was Restoree, a standalone SF romance. I liked her writing well enough to read the Pern books & more after that.

I may never have read Mary Stewart's Merlin trilogy (it was one back when I first read it) save that I got introduced to her writing while stuck at my grandmother's with nothing to read one weekend. I picked up This Rough Magic, a romance novel. It was pretty good. I never wanted to read another of her romances, but her fantasy was excellent.


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