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Archived Marketing No New Posts > Literary agents and traditional publishing

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message 1: by Sarah (new)

Sarah Stafford (sarahstafford) | 5 comments My apologies if this is the wrong thread for this question but I could not seem to find a better place for it, so here goes. I'm curious as to how many of you turned to the world of self-publishing/e-pub after attempting to go the literary agent route?


message 2: by Ian (last edited Aug 14, 2015 06:18PM) (new)

Ian Copsey (ian_d_copsey) | 69 comments Yup... Was referred by my copy editor to Darley Anderson who said they'd get back in 6-8 weeks but feel free to inquire... which passed... then another 6-8 weeks... inquiry... silence... I think it was around 5-6 months before they got back. So sent around to several agencies. Most sent rejections. I did have two agencies say my manuscript stood out above most but still declined. So I "wasted" 12 months waiting...

So I thought "S*d it I'll publish it myself!"

But I was warned that middle grade books are the hardest to market because it's the parents that buy books and not the children - and yes, it's true! Of course, I think I have a nice book - we all do and that's why we write - but the marketing is tough...


message 3: by Christina (new)

Christina McMullen (cmcmullen) Once upon a time, before ebooks were a thing, I had a list of small publishing houses that I planned to submit my work to, but then I set aside my writing. When I finally had a completed book, I went to the website of the only publisher from my list that still interested me. Their website said to allow 12-18 months for submission replies and I said eff a bunch of that nonsense and looked into KDP. No regrets whatsoever.


message 4: by April (new)

April Wilson (aprilwilson) I never considered contacting a literary agent. I went straight to self-publishing. I have the entrepreneurial gene and love doing things myself, in my own way.

I'm sure some did spend a lot of time trying to find an agent, but when that didn't work out, they published on their own.

April


message 5: by Charles (new)

Charles Hash | 1054 comments After doing extensive research into the publishing industry, reading various author's advice on how to break into it, and sending off a couple of short stories to magazines, the decision to go indie was very easy.


message 6: by Owen (new)

Owen O'Neill (owen_r_oneill) | 1509 comments Charles wrote: "After doing extensive research into the publishing industry, reading various author's advice on how to break into it, and sending off a couple of short stories to magazines, the decision to go indie was very easy."

What Charles said. I did have exposure to the publishing industry back in the early 90's. It was not positive to any regard. My more recent research (when our first book was ready), suggested that it had -- if anything -- gotten worse in our genre.


message 7: by Dwayne, Head of Lettuce (new)

Dwayne Fry | 4309 comments Mod
I've been writing a long, long time, but I finally started getting serious about being published about three or four years ago. I read a lot of books on it and looked over the guidelines of a few publishers and came to the conclusion that it was going to be very hard for me to get published as I don't write what most publishers are looking for.

So, when I found out about self publishing through Amazon and how easy it is, I forgot all about traditional publishers.


message 8: by Ken (new)

Ken (kendoyle) | 364 comments Charles wrote: "After doing extensive research into the publishing industry, reading various author's advice on how to break into it, and sending off a couple of short stories to magazines, the decision to go indi..."

What Charles said x2 :)


message 9: by B.K. (new)

B.K. Crawford (bkcrawford) | 3 comments I asked myself this question: What can an agent or traditional publisher do for my book that they won't ask me to do myself? For example: Building a platform and marketing. When I realized the only "advantage" to having an agent or publisher was to have a name on the inside cover readers pay no attention to (and losing revenue when the agents and publishers take their cut), I went with Indie publishing instead.


message 10: by Nik (new)

Nik Krasno We've tried lots of literary agents, but with no success for the first book.
I would rather outsource the commercial part to an agent for commission than do it myself. I don't even have a Facebook yet, not talking even about more sophisticated stuff..


message 11: by Susan (last edited Aug 15, 2015 05:50AM) (new)

Susan May (susanmaywriter) I interviewed Hugh Howey just over two years ago and after speaking to him, I never considered going the trad publishers route. So have never sent off to a publisher or an agent. A bunch of us indies even put out a best selling anthology called From the Indie Side last year, and it went to #1 world wide in anthologies on Amazon, UK, US & Australia without any help from publishers.

Here's the article that changed my mind about publishing, the interview with Hugh. http://www.susanmaywriter.com/2013/04... Before that, I used to think indie authors were people who couldn't get publishing deals. I'm doing fine without them. They would just annoy me, anyway. However, it really depends on your skill set with marketing and your personality. Indie publishing is not for everyone.


message 12: by April (new)

April Wilson (aprilwilson) Dwayne wrote: "I've been writing a long, long time, but I finally started getting serious about being published about three or four years ago. I read a lot of books on it and looked over the guidelines of a few p..."

What Dwayne said, X2.

April


message 13: by April (new)

April Wilson (aprilwilson) Susan wrote: "I interviewed Hugh Howey just over two years ago and after speaking to him, I never considered going the trad publishers route. So have never sent off to a publisher or an agent. A bunch of us indi..."

What Susan said, X2. (Hey, I like this X2 thing.) :) I'm not being facetious, either. I mean it.

April


message 14: by L.F. (new)

L.F. Falconer | 63 comments With stories which do not fit neatly into any genre and lack mass-market appeal, it was nearly impossible to peddle to a publishing house. If they don't believe they can make money on a project, they're not going to invest in it. Self-publishing allows me a small beginning in reaching my audience, no matter how difficult that journey might be.


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