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message 1: by Jim (new)

Jim | 22103 comments I don't know whether other people have tried this, but I've recently written 'in the voice' of a secondary character.

My 'tame poet' Tallis Steelyard is somebody you meet in the Port Naain Intelligencer. There you tend to see him through Benor's eyes (as the tales are told with Benor as the main protagonist.)

But as a side effect of writing Lambent Dreams I've given Tallis a blog. In this I have to write as Tallis. But also to write as Tallis who is playing to his public persona rather than the Tallis who knocks about with Benor.

https://tallissteelyard.wordpress.com...

It's a rather strange experience and I wondered if anybody had done something similar?


Patti (baconater) (goldengreene) | 61757 comments Oh.

For a second I thought we had a puberty thread.

Carry on.


message 3: by Jim (new)

Jim | 22103 comments :-)


message 4: by Darren (last edited Aug 24, 2015 04:34AM) (new)

Darren Humphries (darrenhf) | 6980 comments When I wrote Penny Kilkenny Saves The Day as a spin off from The Man From U.N.D.E.A.D. books, I had to adopt a whole new voice and style because it was a whole other gender.

One reviewer accused me of writing a chick book, so I guess I was successful in making it different. He wasn't happy about it though.


Patti (baconater) (goldengreene) | 61757 comments You should write another Penny book"


message 6: by Jim (new)

Jim | 22103 comments How easy or tricky did you find it Darren?


message 7: by Will (new)

Will Once (willonce) | 4053 comments Yup. I'm currently writing the sequel to Love, Death and Tea from the point of view of a secondary character. It's an interesting experience, especially as it also forces me to change gender.

Isn't the latest offering in the 50 shades series doing a similar thing?


message 8: by Jim (new)

Jim | 22103 comments Not to Benor Dorfinngil it ain't ;-)


G J (Gaff to my friends) Reilly | 1901 comments In Inquisitor I wrote from Michael's POV for the most part, but Piper has to be written from another perspective from time to time, because of the nature of the story. I''m not experienced enough to know if this remotely equates to what you're referring to, Jim, because i haven't read them (but their on my TBR!). But to me, characters are just people. I view it as a 'how would I write my life story from my wife's point of view' exercise. Being your characters, you know them better than anyone else, so how they think and who they are is second nature to you. It's a strange experience to be someone else for a while!


message 10: by Darren (new)

Darren Humphries (darrenhf) | 6980 comments Jim wrote: "How easy or tricky did you find it Darren?"

Writing the character was easy because I we knew her so well, but finding a narrative style that wasn't just the same old same old was tricky at first. I chose to do it 3rd person instead of 1st person to emphasise that this wasn't just another Man From UNDEAD book, but something different set in the same world.


message 11: by Darren (new)

Darren Humphries (darrenhf) | 6980 comments Patti (baconater) wrote: "You should write another Penny book""

what Penny Kilkenny did next?


message 12: by Jim (new)

Jim | 22103 comments G J (Gaff to my friends) wrote: "In Inquisitor I wrote from Michael's POV for the most part, but Piper has to be written from another perspective from time to time, because of the nature of the story. I''m not experienced enough t..."

I found that because I was writing as him, and as him 'writing to his public' I had to not only know the person but know the public persona he'd want to use so it got a bit complicated :-)


message 13: by G J (Gaff to my friends) (last edited Aug 24, 2015 02:37PM) (new)

G J (Gaff to my friends) Reilly | 1901 comments That is a tough one, Jim. I believe there are pills for the headache that probably caused!


message 14: by Jim (new)

Jim | 22103 comments :-)


message 15: by David (new)

David Staniforth (davidstaniforth) | 7939 comments My "imperfect strangers" alternates between two main characters, one male and one female. I didn't really find writing from a female perspective too difficult, but what was difficult was making the voices different enough that the reader knew whose headspace they were in from the start of the chapter, as it is in first person, and I didn't want to signpost with headings.


message 16: by Jim (new)

Jim | 22103 comments I had shifting viewpoints in 'The Flames of the City'. Here it's because things are happening simultaneously hundreds of miles apart, and those doing the things are largely unaware of each other.At least here it was still the narrator's voice but as you say, it can be tricky telling the reader that you've swapped viewpoints without telling the reader that you've swapped viewpoints


message 17: by Tim (new)

Tim | 9478 comments I have alternating male and female POVs in all my novels. It probably helps that none of my female main characters are "girly girls", but in general I think, people are people, and behave and think like people. Mostly.

Obviously, gastropods may have a different opinion.

As far as knowing whose headspace we're in, there's only a few scenes where my POVs meet or are in the same location, so it isn't much of a problem.


message 18: by Anna (new)

Anna Faversham (annafaversham) | 1731 comments Jim wrote: ":-)"

She's good, our Patti, isn't she?


message 19: by Anna (new)

Anna Faversham (annafaversham) | 1731 comments In both my books and my wip I have several different POVs. I think that modern TV has helped to make that possible. They chop and change from villain to policeman and sub plot personalities too.

The tomboy in me comes out for a male pov - I hope. It helps to have worked in psychology and psychiatry - at least that's what I'm telling myself.

I haven't had any complaints about it - yet.

I think the plus point is that the reader gets the whole picture of what is going on.

I do flag it up in the chapter headings.


message 20: by Tim (new)

Tim | 9478 comments I make sure I flag the POV character within the first sentence or so.

The wind ripped the screams from his mouth as Socko plummeted towards the ground. "Fuuuuuu..."

sort of thing. As I recall, that was a very short chapter. ;)

(kidding)


message 21: by Jim (new)

Jim | 22103 comments I tried to ensure that one or the other party was in very different surroundings doing different things.
That rather broke down when both parties were out on a frozen steppe trying to avoid enraged warbands


message 22: by Tim (new)

Tim | 9478 comments I did have a bit of a problem when all 3 of my POVs were held captive on a slave ship! As you say, separate them ASAP!


message 23: by Jim (new)

Jim | 22103 comments It's the exact opposite of playing The Call of Cthulhu. There the cry goes up 'Don't split the party' :-)


message 24: by Tim (new)

Tim | 9478 comments I suspect it's exactly the same, Jim, but as authors we're the DM so looking from the opposite perspective -- split out the weakest member of the herd and devour!!!

(sorry, I'm still on the "just killed off a major character" high!)


message 25: by Jim (new)

Jim | 22103 comments I have killed off three major characters in the four fantasy books. Both had been major parts of the books from quite early on in them.
Looking at them dispassionately the deaths are comparatively matter-of-fact, it happened, get over it.
In one case the hero doesn't 'get over it' but runs amok instead.

I'd tried to make them likable characters as well :-)


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