The Sword and Laser discussion

204 views
Old?

Comments Showing 1-23 of 23 (23 new)    post a comment »
dateDown arrow    newest »

message 1: by Jim (new)

Jim Heivilin | 45 comments Pshaw. I have heard a number of times Veronica call Tom old or either of you guys claim to be old.

Pshaw I say.

I'm 54? 55? Something like that. And while I did join AARP I don't quite think I'm old yet (although I feel old some days with all the broken bits I've accumulated).

So I get grumpy when you young whippersnappers complain about being old. Tom's only got a few years before he gets issued his cane to shake at the young'uns on his lawn but Veronica is still a young buck ... okay a young ... well a youngster.

;-P


message 2: by Sandi (new)

Sandi (sandikal) | 1212 comments I'm 54. My maternal grandmother is turning 100 tomorrow. My paternal grandmother died at 98. I think I'm firmly entrenched in middle age.


message 3: by Tassie Dave, S&L Historian (new)

Tassie Dave | 3542 comments Mod
You are both extremely old :-?

Tom and Veronica are just joking. I call people 20 years younger than me old, if they act it or say something that makes them seem old.

I'm a young 53 ;-) I call my self a 53 year old teenager, because that's how I feel. I love video games. I read comics. I listen to rap, hip hop, top 40 pop and I still like to get out with the kids and kick a footy around (aussie rules, of course) and play cricket in the back yard.

I would be offended (and would use some colourful language) if someone asked me to join the Australian equivalent of AARP.
I don't care if I'd save money. Being thought of as old wouldn't be worth any money. I'll join when I retire, like at 75 or something closer to being old. :-)


message 4: by Trike (new)

Trike | 8494 comments So nice to be the youngest person in a thread for a change.

Geezers.


message 5: by Jim (new)

Jim Heivilin | 45 comments Trike wrote: "So nice to be the youngest person in a thread for a change.

Geezers."


[shakes cane]


message 6: by Robert (new)

Robert Defendi | 54 comments Old is a state of mind. And body. Mainly in the back and prostate.


message 7: by Sandi (new)

Sandi (sandikal) | 1212 comments Tassie Dave, here we can join AARP at 50. I started getting solictations from them at 49-1/2. UGH!


message 8: by Mark (new)

Mark (markmtz) | 2354 comments Robert wrote: "Old is a state of mind. And body. Mainly in the back and prostate."

You forgot to mention knees.


message 9: by Phil (last edited Aug 14, 2015 06:15PM) (new)

Phil | 1140 comments I often feel like I'm the oldest one here (I'm 52) but I think that's mostly because I tend to prefer the older SF from the 40's to 70's that a lot people now often have issues with because of perceptions of sexism or racism.
If I remember correctly (and with my old brain who knows?) a survey a year or so ago put the average age in the group around 30-ish.


message 10: by Jim (last edited Aug 15, 2015 01:46PM) (new)

Jim Heivilin | 45 comments A few years ago I picked up the first book in the Lensmen series by ee "doc" smith. It was roaring good fun but my god was it misogynistic.


message 11: by S. K. (new)

S. K. Pentecost | 36 comments Old is watching the decade you came of age in return fashion-wise. The tight leggings and ripped jeans of the early nineties are back in full force this summer. Only instead of bright plastic mullet brushes sticking out of back pockets, there are iPhones.

It doesn't sneak up on you though, the oldness. Old first rear's it's head the day you are stopped by a cop who is younger than you. Then it hides behind a corner in the ER and says "boo!" with a doctor who looks like he could still be on his parents' insurance.

We can hide behind aphorisms about state of mind, but the realist knows that when (s)he is a decade older than the average lifespan of a human being throughout the history of human beings, the gears are slipping out of sync. The clock is ticking louder.


message 12: by Trike (new)

Trike | 8494 comments God, old people just talk and talk. That's why they still use phones instead of texting. #fersure


message 13: by Stephen (new)

Stephen Richter (stephenofllongbeach) | 1327 comments I am 58 and god it was good to tell people to get off your lawn. Not that I have a lawn anymore, traded it in for a drought resistance plant landscape and now I yell, " hey you GenXers get your plant cuttings from somewhere else you coconut water drinking freeloader." Does not have the same ring.


message 14: by John (Taloni) (new)

John (Taloni) Taloni (johntaloni) | 3958 comments I would write a long response, but my arthritic fingers can't seem to handle it.


message 15: by Trike (new)

Trike | 8494 comments You should just dictate to your in-home healthcare worker. That's what I do.

(I'm a paid slave. Send help! - Marta)


message 16: by Tina (new)

Tina (javabird) | 692 comments Heh, I'm over 60-something and a female and I guess I've pretty much always felt in the minority as far as my taste in books for most of my life.


message 17: by S. K. (new)

S. K. Pentecost | 36 comments Trike wrote: "You should just dictate to your in-home healthcare worker. That's what I do.

(I'm a paid slave. Send help! - Marta)"


like


message 18: by Tom (new)

Tom Wright (tomdwright) | 84 comments Hmm, I'm all of 56, and while there are undeniable changes that come with time, to a very large extent it really is more a state of mind.

People can have physical disabilities at any age, they just become more common as you get older. Whether you let those physical challenges define you is where the state of mind comes in.


message 19: by Trike (last edited Aug 17, 2015 05:07AM) (new)

Trike | 8494 comments "Age is a question of mind over matter. If you don't mind, it doesn't matter." -- Satchel Paige


message 20: by David (new)

David (dbigwood) Phil wrote: "If I remember correctly (and with my old brain who knows?) a survey a year or so ago put the average age in the group around 30-ish. ..."

That would make me about twice the average age, at 62. Still dancing (contra, English country), swimming, and hiking. And still reading new authors and books. Maybe associating with a younger crowd here helps?


message 21: by Trike (last edited Aug 17, 2015 08:33AM) (new)

Trike | 8494 comments I went to the movies the other week and noticed a lot of people in their 60s and 70s and wondered, "What movie are all these old people going to see?" It was the one *I* was going to see: Mr. Holmes. I think that's the last threshold for oldosity.

Suddenly realize you're older than all the Playboy bunnies when you turn 23. Check.

Realize you're older than almost every professional athlete when you turn 30. Check.

Not interested in staying up later than 11:30pm when that used to be the time you started to get ready to go out. Check.

Look at cars for their backseat room and ease of ingress. Check.

Realize your wallet is older than half the people you work with. Check.

Talk about the weather more even though you stopped riding motorcycles 25 years earlier. Check.

Look at magazines in grocery checkout lane and realize you honestly have no idea who any of the people are on the covers of the gossip rags, but recognize the ones on Diabetes Monthly. Check.

Compare surgical procedures over lunch. Check.

Look in the mirror and realize you dress like your dad/mom. Check.

Look in the mirror and realize you're now dressing like your grandfather/grandmother... and see nothing wrong with it because it's comfortable, damnit. Check.

Look around and see all the people who are into the same hings you are look like your grandparents. Check.

If you'll excuse me, I'm meeting a friend at the Black Socks & Sandals Shoppe.


message 22: by John (Taloni) (last edited Aug 17, 2015 09:48AM) (new)

John (Taloni) Taloni (johntaloni) | 3958 comments Tom wrote: "People can have physical disabilities at any age, they just become more common as you get older. Whether you let those physical challenges define you is where the state of mind comes in. "

So true, Tom. My knee arthritis means I don't get around well any more, but I'm still having fun at SF conventions, reading comics, delving into new books, even doing some writing. It's all stuff I enjoyed doing in my 20s. I probably won't be running a marathon again, but there is still plenty of life to live.

Trike: I could do an identical list. The only difference might be "experience nostalgia for East Coast weather" but you are still enjoying that. :)


message 23: by Thane (new)

Thane | 476 comments If your belt is still below your bellybutton, you're doing fine.


back to top