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message 1: by Steve (new)

Steve Downes (stevedownes) | 6 comments "A gritty story with a surprising number of twists and turns right through until the last page.” Amazon Books India

WarWorld: Shadows & Dominions
#scifi #steampunk #novel

http://www.amazon.co.uk/WarWorld-Shad...

now also available in Print
http://www.amazon.co.uk/WarWorld-Shad...


message 2: by Kate (new)

Kate Rauner (katerauner) | 30 comments A one-way journey to Mars may be a mistake.
Hi everyone. My latest novel set in the first colony on Mars is now available.
Colonization of Mars is in trouble when the colony psychologist, one of the first eight settlers, commits suicide. Four more settlers are on their way, bringing renewed hope - and a cat. Emma volunteered so she could explore Mars in her robotic walkabout suit. Even if she gets the chance, that may not make up for everything she left behind. Mars is a hostile planet, danger from Earth follows her, and an inexplicable sense of desolation cripples the settlers. Read this first book in the On Mars series to discover if humans survive on Mars.
Download a free copy from Smashwords.com (http://bit.ly/1LZ733I) with coupon code XY35L. Please post a review on Amazon at http://bit.ly/19IS3nQ, Goodreads, your blog or favorite online retailer, or wherever you hang out. Visit me at katerauner.wordpress.com - I'd love to see what you think. Thanks :) Kate Rauner


message 3: by Brian (last edited Nov 12, 2015 09:02AM) (new)

Brian Dingle | 7 comments Kate wrote: "A one-way journey to Mars may be a mistake.
Hi everyone. My latest novel set in the first colony on Mars is now available.
Colonization of Mars is in trouble when the colony psychologist, one of th..."


Any Speculative Medicine in it?


message 4: by Kate (new)

Kate Rauner (katerauner) | 30 comments Brian - you must be psychic. I include some speculative medicine in passing - something to help fight muscle and bone loss in Mars' low gravity and (in a bonus section) I mention a real-life cancer treatment originated by a citizen scientists named Kanzius that's currently in human trails - looks so hopeful I had to mention it.
But there's a medical issue pivotal to the story - no spoilers, but it's along the lines of "what you think you know that ain't so..."
If you have some reading/reviewing time available, go to Smashwords.com and search for Glory on Mars (or enter https://www.smashwords.com/books/view...) and use coupon code XY35L for a free download - any e-format including mobi for kindle. I'd very much appreciate your honest review.
BTW - that goes for anyone else reading this comment, too. :)


message 5: by Kate (new)

Kate Rauner (katerauner) | 30 comments Kate wrote: "Brian - you must be psychic. I include some speculative medicine in passing - something to help fight muscle and bone loss in Mars' low gravity and (in a bonus section) I mention a real-life cancer..."

Oh - cool - Goodreads recognized the url- just click!


message 6: by Brian (new)

Brian Dingle | 7 comments Kate wrote: "Kate wrote: "Brian - you must be psychic. I include some speculative medicine in passing - something to help fight muscle and bone loss in Mars' low gravity and (in a bonus section) I mention a rea..."

OK, I posted a desire to start doing reviews of books with Speculative Medicine in it, thinking it a niche I should pay attention to. I think that was 24 hours ago, and I have four at least. Well, this will be four. I'll download the book and try to get to it before Christmas (still have a day and night job!).
Your bio reads like Science Fiction. Didn't Madame Curie have terrible arthritis as a result of handling stuff like that?


message 7: by Brian (last edited Nov 12, 2015 09:59AM) (new)

Brian Dingle | 7 comments Kate wrote: "Brian - you must be psychic. I include some speculative medicine in passing - something to help fight muscle and bone loss in Mars' low gravity and (in a bonus section) I mention a real-life cancer..."
OK, got it. Will get to it, but at my age, head is rather sieve like.
Computers really are amazing. A little hard to believe the first one I programmed was 48 years ago! 7 minutes since you wrote to me.
Paper based publishing is probably on its last legs; the challenge now is knowing what to buy!
Last Two Lines of Post are a Challenge to Everyone

About my sieve head: if nothing surfaces (review I mean) by Christmas, rattle my cage. Thanks
Cheers


message 8: by Kate (new)

Kate Rauner (katerauner) | 30 comments Brian - you're offering me a big favor, so take your time - I hope you'll enjoy the book.
There were some sad accidents with radioactive elements when they were first discovered - there were even caves and springs with high levels of Radon that people marketed as treatments for disease! Of course, some accidents occurred after we knew better. At my plant, the worst thing was "berylliosis". Some people have a genetic sensitivity to beryllium (used in electronics for example) that leads to lung disease with small exposure to the dust, while other people can be covered in the stuff with no effect. That was only learned when people got sick.
You're absolutely right that reviews are becoming the key - I hope the culture of reviewing books grows. Thanks (and Merry Christmas in advance).


message 9: by Brian (new)

Brian Dingle | 7 comments There are some arguments about chronic low level radiation being protective against cancer, probably by up regulating DNA repair mechanisms before the big insults occur. A lecture I attended here at the cancer center showed some epidemiological evidence from buildings in Hong Kong with contaminated steel and they found reduced mortality among the occupants.


message 10: by Kate (new)

Kate Rauner (katerauner) | 30 comments Brian - interesting. Our workforce in the areas where radioactive materials were handled were well-studied and tended to have less sicknesses than the general population,but they attributed that to "healthy worker syndrome" (to hold down a job you have to be healthy)and because there was no-smoking in the "hot"areas, so even smokers tended to smoke fewer cigarettes over time than those in the general population - this started in the 1950s so it was before smoking was prohibited in most buildings.


message 11: by Rohini (new)

Rohini Singh | 1 comments Introducing new concepts to science fiction with the my novel "The Time Manipulator's Son". Three boys, 2 worlds and 1 epic adventure. http://tinyurl.com/TTMS-P


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