Anarchist & Radical Book Club discussion

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message 1: by Dan (new)

Dan | 11 comments I'm looking for a fictionalized book that deals with how debt-based money is created and how our money supply works. Something I could use to introduce this subject to high school students without boring them to death. Does such a book exist or do I have to write it myself?


message 2: by Feliks (last edited Aug 11, 2015 09:35AM) (new)

Feliks (dzerzhinsky) That's a tough one. 'Debt'--as part of a dramatic story--which is also alluring and accessible to kids...whew.

Since the late 70s, there has been an occasional/minor trend in supermarket checkout aisle paperback bestsellers dealing with the 'sexiness' of high finance and economics. Probably started with the book/mini-series from Harold Robbins called, 'The Betsy'. There was also a Kris Kristofferson/Jane Fonda movie called, 'Rollover'.

Thus, what followed was a line of rather turgid books like this:
Comprador
Someone Else's Money
Green Monday
11 Harrowhouse (deals with jewel markets)
(Michael M. Thomas is the author of two of these, no surprise)

Or, you might check out something from James Clavell like: Tai-Pan (longshot)

But listen, nevermind all these, really.
Who not go for something robust:

Death of a Salesman
by Arthur Miller

This is the most compelling way to describe American
economics, I think.

Oh! There's also two works from Dickens which deal with debt/finance as the theme:
Little Dorritt
Our Mutual Friend
But I admit the relevancy to today is strained, and thin.

Failing all this, maybe Shakespeare's 'Merchant of Venice'? Starring the infamous 'Shylock'. Most famous moneylender ever. (Although you'd have to explain away the anti-semitism).

Brainstorming at random:

A nonfiction book from which you could pluck snippets:
The Rich and the Super Rich: A Study in the Power of Money Today

Other wisps: something from Henry James? Gore Vidal? Edith Wharton? Theodore Dreiser? Something else from the age of Empire like The Education of Henry Adams?

Something written about the Crash of '29?


message 3: by Dan (new)

Dan | 11 comments It's a good start, thanks!


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