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Author Promotion > Publishing Opportunity for Horror Writers

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message 1: by Randolph (new)

Randolph (us227381) | 2 comments Darkwater wrote: "Hello, Horror Writers:

We are Darkwater Syndicate, a publishing company headquartered in Miami, Florida. We're writing to let you know of a publishing opportunity.

We're looking to release a sci-..."


This link is "404 Page does not exist" which makes me think something fishy is going on with this post. If it doesn't stop smelling like tuna that's been left out in the sun too long in about 8 hours it is getting cement shoes and going into Charleston Harbor.


message 2: by Randolph (new)

Randolph (us227381) | 2 comments Darkwater wrote: "Hello, Horror Writers:

We are Darkwater Syndicate, a publishing company headquartered in Miami, Florida. We're writing to let you know of a publishing opportunity.

We're looking to release a sci-..."


This link is "404 Page does not exist" which makes me think something fishy is going on with this post. If it doesn't stop smelling like tuna that's been left out in the sun too long in about 8 hours it is getting cement shoes and going into Charleston Harbor.


message 3: by David (last edited Aug 11, 2015 03:33AM) (new)

David Brian (davidbrian) | 39 comments I also noticed the flawed link, Randolph. This appears to be their website, and at first glance it does appear legit. Though I can't claim to have heard of them, or of anything they have published.


message 4: by Frances (new)

Frances There's nothing fishy about it; someone just didn't copy the last seventeen characters of the link before pasting it into the post.

(I mean, they might have had downtime as well, but that is SO not the issue.)

That said, asking for 8000-word stories and putting up a link to a submission form that specifically asks for two chapters of the book-length work seems a bit off.


message 5: by Amanda (new)

Amanda Lyons (amandamlyons) You must be a new press, looks like you try to do solid offering for contracts. I work at a small press myself, but we have a few years under our belt. Could you tell us a bit about how your contracts are run? I think that would help with making you more clear on being legit for those wondering if you are. There have been a lot of vanity presses popping up and we all know how often those are about making a buck and not getting an author published.


message 6: by Amanda (new)

Amanda Lyons (amandamlyons) Darkwater wrote: "Hi Amanda. We've been around since 2008. We are not a vanity press. We pay you royalties on the sale of each book. You do not pay us to get your book published. At the moment we're planning to rele..."

Oh, I didn't think you were, but that that's why people get nervous these days when they hear about a press they don't know. I often have to explain our interests and contracts when I post about JEA as well. But then I'd rather they be on the lookout for those scam artists than getting suckered in.

You're on the same page as we are then :) J. Ellington Ashton is newer than yours it seems, but the same goals. Good to see we're not alone in that.


message 7: by Randolph (new)

Randolph (us227381) | 2 comments Well everything does seem to be on the up and up here (guess who I work for) after all. I'm just staying vigilant but don't have the time to chase down all the details of semi-commercial posts in the group so I wanted to let all involved know I am watching.

Goodreads seems to have veered somewhat towards the author side, or maybe I should say the business side, of the literary sphere since a certain South American river cartel took over so I may seem over vigilant as siding with readers versus the biz side of things when it comes to the Group. The short answer is don't take offense.


message 8: by Frances (new)

Frances Darkwater, I saw it; it's just a comment on people's patterns of focus online. Form field labels resemble headings, and tend to get skimmed first, so people get sent to a page for story subs and see the details about book chapters before the instructions.

(Also, if you don't put anything in the "first chapter" field, as you wouldn't if submitting a short story, you can't submit the form. You're told to "please correct the highlighted fields", and the highlighting is actually fairly easy to miss. :) )

Do you have details on what royalties you're offering, how they're split up between authors, how many authors to a book, etc.? I looked, but didn't see anything like that.


message 9: by Frances (new)

Frances Hmh. Okay, thank you for sharing what you feel you can. :)


message 10: by Randolph (new)

Randolph (us227381) | 2 comments Sorry, sort of, but I moved this to the Author Promotion folder since it seemed to be taking up a lot of space on the homepage and in a folder it really didn't belong since it's more of a commercial thing. I still left it as an open thread, at least for now. If it really starts to dominate the Group's discussion, as it really is now, I'll have to cut it off. I suggest people instead follow the correct link to the posters site if they want to know more.


message 11: by J.S. (new)

J.S. Watts | 239 comments Interesting thread, wherever it's based.


message 12: by J.S. (new)

J.S. Watts | 239 comments Now I've had a chance to look at the website, may I ask Darkwater if you have minimum and maximum length for submissions? You say around 8000 words (which is a mighty long short story). Would you consider shorter or longer?


message 13: by J.S. (new)

J.S. Watts | 239 comments Darkwater wrote: "Hi JS. Yes, we will consider shorter or longer submissions. 8000 words was just a suggestion. Our target is 5000 to 9000 words per story."

Many thanks.


message 14: by S.L. (new)

S.L. Walker (TAKSLWalker) | 10 comments As a Kensington Gore's Hammered Horror Publishing author I wanted to inform anyone interested in FEMME FATAL.
"FEMME FATAL" is a fab short story collection to help raise the profile of women horror writers and to help a domestic violence charity, Women's Aid.

Submission deadline - the final edit to reach us no later than the 1st September 2015 - with a planned October release for Halloween. Which means there are 5 days left!!

Author must be female, he subject matter or links for any story are broad but we would like stories that appeal to women with female characters in a high profile role.


message 15: by Scott (new)

Scott Do you have any plans to help male victims of domestic violence as well?


message 16: by S.L. (last edited Aug 27, 2015 09:30PM) (new)

S.L. Walker (TAKSLWalker) | 10 comments Do you? Have you?

I will be honest in no way am I a modern feminist. 25% of American Men are victims of domestic violence and unlike other women I will not act as though that statistic is false. I do however know that I personally have experienced domestic violence and anyone who needs help deserves to get it.

The charity is based in the UK and while I am American I do want to help, just like I would want to help if there were a book to help the Mankind Initiative which is also based in the UK.

I have a son and realize right now there are too many gender based stereotypes that are harmful to men. This is why I am a supporter for the National Coalition For Men. I also am a big supporter of Intact America.

The fact is that I am only an author relaying an opportunity for female horror authors. The question you ask is not one for me to answer but I did answer to you my advocacy against all abuse.


message 17: by Scott (new)

Scott Good to hear, thanks for responding.


message 18: by Randolph (new)

Randolph (us227381) | 2 comments I am watching. Let's all play nice. Everything looks cool so far.

I'm a big fan of human rights in general and lean towards the philosophy that one being shouldn't exert an inherent advantage to the detriment of anyone else. Most of the world's problems are either, I want you to be more like me, or I want your stuff, or I don't want to share my stuff even though you need it more than I do. If we could leave each other alone except to help, well then things might get somewhat less horrifying in the real world. The bitter fact however is that for a whole litany of reasons women and children are more negatively impacted by domestic violence than men.


message 19: by David (last edited Aug 28, 2015 05:08AM) (new)

David Brian (davidbrian) | 39 comments S.L. wrote: "Author must be female..."

Really? Why?

I should think that any project highlighting the issue of abuse would benefit by having male authors on board, thus highlighting a unified stance. Just my two penneth.


message 20: by J.S. (new)

J.S. Watts | 239 comments David wrote: "S.L. wrote: "Author must be female..."

Really? Why?

I should think that any project highlighting the issue of abuse would benefit by having male authors on board, thus highlighting a unified stan..."


It's a question you might want to ask of the publisher, but interestingly enough, I think they have provided the answer on the website link provided by SL: "The writer has to be female, don't want to sound sexist here but this project is to break through the glass ceiling of sexism towards women in horror writing."


message 21: by Frances (new)

Frances Probably because the anthology also aims to promote women writing horror fiction, as was mentioned on the linked page. :)


message 22: by Frances (new)

Frances Heh! A hat-tip to J.S., who responds quicker than I do.


message 23: by J.S. (new)

J.S. Watts | 239 comments Frances wrote: "Heh! A hat-tip to J.S., who responds quicker than I do."

:-)


message 24: by David (new)

David Brian (davidbrian) | 39 comments J.S. and Frances. Perhaps I should have read the headliner before responding.:)

Separate issue; what would your opinions be with regards to a "glass ceiling of sexism" in the horror genre?


message 25: by J.S. (last edited Aug 28, 2015 09:36AM) (new)

J.S. Watts | 239 comments David wrote: "J.S. and Frances. Perhaps I should have read the headliner before responding.:)

Separate issue; what would your opinions be with regards to a "glass ceiling of sexism" in the horror genre?"


Speaking as a woman writer of various genres, including horror, I do feel there are still issues of gender bias amongst some publishers and editors. It's one of the reasons I started writing under my initials rather than a recognisably female first name. I have felt and, at times, continue to feel the bias and there are lots of statistics out there which prove the bias (which is in favour of male writers). Things have improved a little over the years, but, in my view, there is still a distance to be travelled.


message 26: by Frances (new)

Frances My thoughts would be "How unsurprising, the horror genre is not miraculously better than SF, fantasy, mystery, general fiction, or many other non-genre aspects of life."

The thoughts would then continue along the lines of "Yes, I think the systemic entrenched bias in favour of male authors is bad."

I would also think "I reserve the right to leave this discussion promptly if it turns into a rehash of sexism 101, because I have seven stories to finish editing and two to write and people I want to spend time with and assorted RL obligations and concerns, and I get to decide that my very rare free time is not spent on teaching moments."

I would finish with the thought that Kensington Gore's decision not to pay female authors for their work in this instance is not exactly thrilling me, as it reflects the common tendency of women's work being undervalued. Furthermore, I find their statement that "royalties after profits" would go to a domestic violence charity is unclear, and the fact that there is no contact information to ask for clarification frustrating. (Seriously. After what profits? Do they mean that royalties will be donated after expenses are recouped? What royalties - 7%, 25%, 80%?)


message 27: by S.L. (new)

S.L. Walker (TAKSLWalker) | 10 comments I do know it will be profits after expenses are recouped. Sorry I have missed most of this conversation as I am suffering from a concussion and not had a good day.


message 28: by S.L. (new)

S.L. Walker (TAKSLWalker) | 10 comments The reason that no one is being paid for their work is that it is for charity. If you are an author or picked up as an author you are paid. :)


message 29: by S.L. (new)

S.L. Walker (TAKSLWalker) | 10 comments Not for this book but any book you may have published afterward.


message 30: by David (last edited Aug 29, 2015 04:38AM) (new)

David Brian (davidbrian) | 39 comments J,S. and Frances, thanks for the reply. I have to admit it isn't something I've previously given much thought to.
Maybe I am just naive, but now that I have considered it, I find it staggering to suggest that a publisher/editor would turn something down purely because it was written by a woman. Off the top of my head names such as Anne Rice, Shirley Jackson, Nancy Holder, Lisa Tuttle, Sarah Langan, Lisa Morton, Sarah Pinborough, Lisa Mannetti, R.B. Chesterton, Alexandra Sokoloff (and I'm sure the list goes on), all point to quality and successful female writers.

Surely it is more a case of their now being so many books available, that the Big Five (and just about anyone else) can afford to cherry pick the absolute cream - and by this I mean what is more likely to sell, as opposed to quality of the craft.

Anyhow, thanks for responding to my question. Good luck with the anthology, S.L.


message 31: by J.S. (new)

J.S. Watts | 239 comments Those who haven't given much thought to socially in-built gender bias in the writing profession up until now, and/or haven't experienced it, might find the following link of interest: http://jezebel.com/homme-de-plume-wha...


message 32: by Scott (new)

Scott David wrote: "Maybe I am just naive, but now that I have considered it, I find it staggering to suggest that a publisher/editor would turn something down purely because it was written by a woman. Off the top of my head names such as Anne Rice, Shirley Jackson, Nancy Holder, Lisa Tuttle, Sarah Langan, Lisa Morton, Sarah Pinborough, Lisa Mannetti, R.B. Chesterton, Alexandra Sokoloff (and I'm sure the list goes on), all point to quality and successful female writers."

Indeed it does, and that's not even taking into account the paranormal romance and supernatural P.I. fiction that literally floods the bookstore shelves.


message 33: by Frances (last edited Aug 29, 2015 10:04AM) (new)

Frances David, no-one is saying people would reject something "just because it was written by a woman".

(Here's a fun exercise. Go to a bookstore. Count the number of authors in a section. Count how many authors are women. I did this in the SF/F section of a bookstore, and came away with eighty authors, and a quarter of them were women.)

What's being said is that people (yes, both men and women) are exposed to social pressure throughout their life to pay attention to men over women and rate the work of women more harshly. If a story might be accepted, that harsher judging can make the difference.

J.S.'s link is interesting. There are other more clinical studies; results of double-blind testing of essay grading where the same essay gets a lower grade when it's submitted with a woman's name, discrepancies between salary offers, et-merry-cetera.

Incidentally, theorizing that works by men "are picked because they will sell better" tends to rely on one of a few things.
* First, the idea that readers are more likely to buy works by men than by women. (It's interesting to suggest this if prejudice is so easily overcome that all slush readers and editors in the industry are somehow completely free of it.)
* Second, the idea that men are just generally more capable of writing sellable works than women.
* Third, the idea that women are exposed to pressure which predisposes them to avoid writing.

Does your assumption rely on one of those? Which one? If not, what is it based on?


message 34: by Frances (new)

Frances S.L.: I follow that, but I still find that the decision to promote female authors--which is the other goal of the anthology--by giving them the chance to not get paid makes me slightly uneasy.

Possibly I'd feel differently if there wasn't also a decision not to give authors a comp copy of the work (when one other Kensington Gore charity anthology was apparently an ebook, I'm wondering if a great deal of money is actually saved by not issuing contributor copies), and the decision not to bother telling authors that their stories have been rejected.

I'm perfectly willing to own that I read these decisions as somewhat dismissive of the author's efforts, and therefore I am probably predisposed to look askance at the payment decision! These are my perspectives, I have shown you them.

Wishing the anthology and those who submit the best of luck.


message 35: by Randolph (new)

Randolph (us227381) | 2 comments Frances wrote: "David, no-one is saying people would reject something "just because it was written by a woman".

(Here's a fun exercise. Go to a bookstore. Count the number of authors in a section. Count how many ..."


These are pretty good comments, for a woman (please don't beat me, I couldn't help myself).

Frances, I think you were the member that quite rightly accused me of lamp-shading at one time. It is good that someone points out our misconceptions and prejudices once in awhile. When one learns not to take it so personally it often becomes a valuable learning experience.


message 36: by David (new)

David Brian (davidbrian) | 39 comments Frances wrote: "Does your assumption rely on one of those? Which one? If not, what is it based on? "

Frances, I don't believe I made any assumptions. I just pointed out that it's tough getting published, regardless of gender. And that I wasn't convinced of a "glass ceiling of sexism towards women in horror." (Although I admit to never previously giving the subject much thought)


As for percentages: It's an impossible question for me (or most anyone else)to answer without having access to the necessary figures. I have no idea what the male-to-female ratio is among those writing horror and dark fantasy.


message 37: by Frances (new)

Frances No worries, Randolph. I credit feminine intuition with allowing me to tell when someone is just saying the things jackasses say, and when they're actually being a jackass. ;)

(Plus, beating people totally runs counter to my gentle nature! I have a mellow soul. It came with the ovaries.)


message 38: by Kaddi (last edited Aug 31, 2015 02:44AM) (new)

Kaddi | 1 comments I see women being discriminated against in many walks of life, although nowhere near to the degree it happened twenty years ago.
Times have certainly changed for the better.
As for writing fiction, and in the horror genre particularly... I just don't see it. There are many, many talented female authors whose work brightens(?) this field.
Maybe female writers are being discriminated against. Who knows? But the link posted above proves nothing. It is one woman's experience, and there could be any number of variables leading to the results she received.
I personally feel online debates such as this do nothing for us, other than perhaps weakening women's standing in an already tough world.


message 39: by Frances (last edited Aug 31, 2015 04:42AM) (new)

Frances I personally like that article because of all the links it contains to examples of the behaviour that aren't "one woman's experience".

But in any case, I'm very glad you and David have had experiences that lead you to believe that the prejudice that exists elsewhere in life may be or is absent from the horror genre, and respect your decision not to want to discuss it futher. :)


message 40: by Randolph (new)

Randolph (us227381) | 2 comments I'm not one to flog a dead horse, okay I am, but it seems to me that the horror, or at least the uncanny, has always been more accepting of women authors than sf (Is this still true?). The big money makers in horror are still all male except for Anne Rice.

I may be completely wrong since I pay very little attention to sf as a genre anymore, just specific authors. Most of the new "blockbuster" sf looks like rubbish to me, but I guess this is true of most genre fiction.


message 41: by Scott (last edited Sep 01, 2015 06:59PM) (new)

Scott Randolph wrote: "I'm not one to flog a dead horse, okay I am, but it seems to me that the horror, or at least the uncanny, has always been more accepting of women authors than sf (Is this still true?)."

I browse the bookstore shelves from A-Z frequently and, though I haven't done a formal tally, I'd say the number of female SF/F authors at least equals the number of male authors. They're certainly no minority.


message 42: by Randolph (new)

Randolph (us227381) | 2 comments Scott wrote: "Randolph wrote: "I'm not one to flog a dead horse, okay I am, but it seems to me that the horror, or at least the uncanny, has always been more accepting of women authors than sf (Is this still tru..."

Well that's what ignorance gets me.


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