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message 1: by Cheri (last edited Dec 27, 2015 02:28PM) (new)

Cheri (jovali2) I've challenged myself to read, on average, a book a week for 2015. Since I'm joining late, I'll update what I've already read. I'm behind schedule, but plan to catch up! Asterisks indicate how many stars I gave each book.

1. Gertrude Bell: Queen of the Desert, Shaper of Nations ****
2. Ajax Penumbra 1969 ****
3. All That I Am ***
4. A Thousand Acres *****
5. The Martian ****
6. The Boys in the Boat: Nine Americans and Their Epic Quest for Gold at the 1936 Berlin Olympics ****
7. The Girl on the Train *****
8. We Are All Completely Beside Ourselves *****
9. The Most Good You Can Do: How Effective Altruism Is Changing Ideas About Living Ethically ****
10. A Hologram for the King ***
11. Gone Girl ***
12. The Blue Zones Solution: Eating and Living Like the World's Healthiest People ***
13. My Beloved World ***
14. The Likeness ****
15. The Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Fry *****
16. My Brilliant Friend ****
17. King Lear *****
18. A Heartbreaking Work of Staggering Genius ***
19. The Man in the Queue ***
20. Why We Love Dogs, Eat Pigs, and Wear Cows: An Introduction to Carnism: The Belief System That Enables Us to Eat Some Animals and Not Others *****
21. Liar, Temptress, Soldier, Spy: Four Women Undercover in the Civil War by Karen Abbott ****
22. The Map That Changed the World by Simon Winchester ***
23. The Sense of an Ending by Julian Barnes ****
24. Euphoria by Lily King *****
25. The Portable Faulkner by Malcolm Cowley (ed.) and William Faulkner (author) *****
26. A Tale for the Time Being by Ruth Ozeki ****
27. What the Chinese Don't Eat by Xinran **
28. The Year of Reading Dangerously: How Fifty Great Books (and Two Not-So-Great Ones) Saved My Life by Andy Miller **
29. The Woman Warrior by Maxine Hong Kingston *****
30. Gaudy Night by Dorothy L. Sayers ****
31. Wednesday Is Indigo Blue: Discovering the Brain of Synesthesia by Richard E. Cytowic and David Eagleman *****
32. Never Too Late to Go Vegan: The Over-50 Guide to Adopting and Thriving on a Plant-Based Diet by Carol J. Adams, Patti Breitman and Ginny Messina *****
33. Murder 101 by Faye Kellerman ***
34. All the Light We Cannot See by Anthony Doerr ***
35. Nothing to Do but Stay: My Pioneer Mother by Carrie Young ***
36. Your Best Year Yet!: Ten Questions for Making the Next Twelve Months Your Most Successful Ever by Jinny Ditzler ****
37. How Carrots Won the Trojan War: Curious (but True) Stories of Common Vegetables by Rebecca Rupp (2 stars)
38. Gut : The Inside Story of Our Body's Most Under-Rated Organ by Giulia Enders (5 stars)
39. The Boston Girl by Anita Diamant (3 stars)
40. The Great Transition: Shifting from Fossil Fuels to Solar and Wind Energy by Lester Russell Brown (5 stars)
41. The Assassination of Margaret Thatcher by Hilary Mantel (5 stars)
42. Jane and Prudence by Barbara Pym (3 stars)
43. Dubliners by James Joyce (4 stars)
44. Happy Money: The Science of Smarter Spending by Elizabeth Dunn & Michael Norton (4 stars)
45. The Riddle of the Labyrinth: The Quest to Crack an Ancient Code by Margalit Fox (5 stars)
46. Stoner by John Williams (4 stars)
47. Waste-Free Kitchen Handbook: A Guide to Eating Well and Saving Money By Wasting Less Food by Dana Gunders (4 stars)
48. Happy All the Time by Laurie Colwin (3 stars)
49. Every Person on the Planet: An Only Somewhat Anxiety-Filled Tale for the Holidays by Bruce Eric Kaplan (3 stars)
50. Suffer the Little Children by Donna Leon (3 stars)
51. The Testament of Mary by Colm Tóibín (4 stars)
52. Mislaid by Nell Zink (4 stars)
53. Hercule Poirot's Christmas by Agatha Christie (2 stars)

CHALLENGE COMPLETED!!!!

I'll keep editing this post to update as I read more. I was looking at other people's posts and loved Cassandra's and Erica's method of keeping track of what they read. So I'm adding that below, too. I've just joined the group and learned so much from you all already!

2015 Reading Statistics

Genre/Type
Biography/Memoir: 6
Classics:
Fantasy:
Graphic Novel:
Cartoons: 1
Historical Fiction: 3
General Fiction: 3
Play: 1
Literary Fiction: 12
Mystery: 8
History: 2
Social Action: 3
Psychology: 1
Food & Nutrition: 5
Other Nonfiction: 3
Science Fiction: 1
Science: 2
Short Stories: 2

Length
Short (<250 pages): 16
Medium (250-500 pages): 33
Long (501-800 pages): 4
Very Long (>800 pages):

Author Gender
Female: 35
Male: 19

Author Ethnicity
White: 48
People of color: 5

New to Me or Repeat Author?
New to Me: 41
Repeat: 12

Series or Standalone Book?
Series: 8
Stand alone: 45

Re-read?
Yes: 4

Format
eBook: 35
Hard or paperback: 17
Audiobook: 1


message 2: by Cheri (new)

Cheri (jovali2) book 21: Liar, Temptress, Soldier, Spy: Four Women Undercover in the Civil War by Karen Abbott

Fascinating, exciting read, giving a real feel for certain aspects of southern life during the Civil War. I think the author should have been more skeptical of some of her sources, and I wish she had given more context about women in wartime. Still, a very good read.


message 3: by Emily (new)

Emily (emilyesears) | 529 comments I absolutely LOVE The Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Fry. I read it in March 2014 and I still think about it pretty regularly. I count it as one of my favorite books now.

Those stats are a great idea! I might have to do that as well.


message 4: by Cheri (new)

Cheri (jovali2) Emily wrote: "I absolutely LOVE The Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Fry. I read it in March 2014 and I still think about it pretty regularly. I count it as one of my favorite books now.

Those stats are a great id..."

Emily, I loved that book, too! Really good.
I copied the idea from other people, modifying it a bit to fit my needs. Hope you enjoy doing it, too.


message 5: by Cheri (new)

Cheri (jovali2) The Sense of an Ending by Julian Barnes

An intriguing, thought-provoking book whose basic point is this: We are all unreliable narrators of our own lives -- an unsettling thought at best.

I was at times annoyed by Tony (the protagonist), but in the end I decided that was part of the point. The book is studded with statements to be pondered, such as: "History is that certainty produced at the point where the imperfections of memory meet the inadequacies of documentation" and "time doesn't act as a fixative, rather as a solvent."


message 6: by Cheri (new)

Cheri (jovali2) Euphoria by Lily King (5 stars)

This is a novel based on a short period in Margaret Mead's life. The situation and the characters, as well as Lily King's masterful writing, make this an incredibly powerful and absorbing book. I highly recommend it; it's one of the best books I've read recently.


message 7: by Cheri (new)

Cheri (jovali2) The Portable Faulkner by Malcolm Cowley (ed.), and William Faulkner (author) (5 stars)

The five stars are for Malcolm Cowley, whose introduction was invaluable. I don't know what to say about Faulkner himself. I found the writing compelling, very sensual, but I was often at a loss what to make of it. The best part of this book for me was the novella Old Man, but it's out of the mainstream of much of Faulkner's writing since it's not part of the Yoknapatawpha stories.


message 8: by Cassandra (new)

Cassandra | 5832 comments Have you been surprised at all by your reading statistics? I know I have!

We also have some pretty similar reading tastes, so I added a couple of your books to my to-read list. :)


message 9: by Cheri (new)

Cheri (jovali2) Cassandra wrote: "Have you been surprised at all by your reading statistics? I know I have!

We also have some pretty similar reading tastes, so I added a couple of your books to my to-read list. :)"


Hi, Cassandra, thanks for stopping by! Yes, I've been quite surprised by a few things in my reading stats, I'm so glad I found the idea in one of your posts. Without consciously trying, I've read more books by women than by men, and a lot more e-books. A few years ago I thought e-books were awful -- and now I see that all the unfinished books on my list are hardcopy. So glad you found a couple books to add to your list. Since our tastes are similar, I'll pop over and check yours out!


message 10: by Cassandra (new)

Cassandra | 5832 comments I knew before starting the #readwomen challenge that I read far more male authors than female authors, and that's still true but it's balanced out this year (47 women to 53 male). I'm also surprised that I've read way more books by author's I've never read before than authors I know I like, which is pretty cool - I like being exposed to new things.

I have a Kindle, but I still don't do many audiobooks. I get most of my books from a library system that still has more hard copies than audiobooks for borrowing, and I also buy super cheap books at garage sales and secondhand stores. So for me, it's still cheaper to do paper copies. I expect that will change as the publishing industry comes around to electronic formats.


message 11: by Cheri (new)

Cheri (jovali2) I would like to listen to more audiobooks, but I find they introduce another element -- the quality of the reader. I've been put off by several that I've tried, especially when male readers do female voices in a breathy or semi-falsetto voice. Yuck! What I like most about e-books is the ability to read in the dark. If I wake up in the middle of the night, I don't have to turn on a light or worry about waking my husband. I also like how portable a Kindle is.


message 12: by Cassandra (new)

Cassandra | 5832 comments Oops, I don't know how I ended up writing audiobooks twice, because I actually meant ebooks. Obviously I was doing too much multitasking!

I've been trying out audiobooks because this summer I had to commute over an hour each way to get to an internship. It was helpful because it made me feel like I was being productive while driving, but it's true that narrators can make or break the book.


message 13: by Cheri (new)

Cheri (jovali2) A Tale for the Time Being by Ruth Ozeki (4 stars)

A beautiful meditation on time and being. The book was both soothing and unsettling – as Juki would say, up is down. It fell apart a bit at the end, not resolving what could have (should have) been resolved, and wading too deeply into magical realism under the odd guise of quantum physics.

I would love to have Juki for my own grandmother. :)


message 14: by Cheri (new)

Cheri (jovali2) What the Chinese Don't Eat by Xinran (2 stars)

A very disappointing book. I realize it is a collection of newspaper columns, but there is no overarching theme that emerges (except the obvious: China is different from the west), and no attempt at explanation. There should have been some editing to make Xinran's non-native English flow better, to provide a clearer focus to each piece, and to remove the overly trite statements.


message 15: by Cheri (new)

Cheri (jovali2) The Year of Reading Dangerously: How Fifty Great Books (and Two Not-So-Great Ones) Saved My Life by Andy Miller (2 stars) 28/52

A gimmicky book with a misleading title, more irrelevant memoir than literary adventure. A couple chapters into it I decided to use some of Miller’s own tricks and read his book purely to see what personal betterment I could gain from its pages. There were some laugh-out-loud segments (the comparison of Moby Dick to The Davinci Code) and sweet moments (Miller works hard at being a good father), but there were very few insights into the value of reading from a self-chosen list. I am sorry that I stuck with it to the end.


message 16: by Cheri (new)

Cheri (jovali2) The Woman Warrior by Maxine Hong Kingston (5 stars) 29/52

A captivating book that turned every which way – page after page the words shape-shifted from fact to fantasy and back again, all the while catching at underlying truths. I felt immersed in the childhood world of a Chinese American girl, but the “ghosts” that haunted her have names in every language.

How could I not have discovered this book before?


message 17: by Cheri (new)

Cheri (jovali2) Gaudy Night by Dorothy L. Sayers (4 stars) 30/52

This was a re-read for me (third or fourth time in 30+ years); I think it's the best of the Wimsey/Vane series. Possibly because so many books now carry descriptive subtitles, I found myself thinking of it as Gaudy Night: The Problem with Principles. It's refreshing to read a mystery that tackles social issues while solving a who-done-it, and this one explores more abstract values (having any sort of principle) than most. Even so, every time I read it, it gets harder to let go of Sayers' obvious prejudices. It's a period piece, and a very good one, but not aligned with modern sensibilities.


message 18: by Cheri (new)

Cheri (jovali2) Wednesday Is Indigo Blue: Discovering the Brain of Synesthesia by Richard E. Cytowic and David Eagleman (5 stars) 31/52

"Reality is not one size fits all." That's the take-home message from this fascinating book by two neuroscientists who study synesthesia. The stories of people who see music, taste shapes, or sense a color with every number fill the pages, but it's also a story of how researchers in the field have honed in on what's happening in the brain with a wide range of cross-sense perceptions. It turns out that this kind of experience, to varying degrees, is much more common than previously believed, and that perception of cross-sensory similarities may be innate. Particularly interesting to me were the discussion of the cross-cultural similarity of sensory metaphors and the explanation of synesthetic perceptions that may be reported as religious experience.


message 19: by Cheri (new)

Cheri (jovali2) Never Too Late to Go Vegan: The Over-50 Guide to Adopting and Thriving on a Plant-Based Diet by Carol J. Adams, Patti Breitman and Ginny Messina (5 stars) 32/52

A well written, useful book for those interested in moving to a plant-based diet. In addition to what you'd expect (basic nutrition and recipes, tips for dining out, online resources), the book addresses the particular needs of people over the age of 50, such as dealing with adult children who are upset by your change in diet; working with the food staff at a retirement community to get plant-based meals; and the challenges of care-giving and being cared for. Overall, both thoughtful and inspiring.


message 20: by Cheri (new)

Cheri (jovali2) Murder 101 by Faye Kellerman (3 stars) 33/52

I purchased this recently on an e-book special because I've enjoyed the series in the past. This one seemed a little off -- the characters have gotten pat in their relationships, the rich young kid on the force was overdone, the writing was a bit clunky, and the stereotypes were beginning to border on offensive. Still, it was engaging enough when I wanted some distraction. Readers who haven't read the earlier books might want to check those out first or the whole set-up may not make much sense.


message 21: by Cheri (new)

Cheri (jovali2) All the Light We Cannot See by Anthony Doerr (3 stars) 34/52

This is a lovely book in many ways, especially in its writing, which is lyrical; I would even describe the book as luminous. And yet...

Despite the poetic prose, I felt blinded by the light that permeates the text. There are dark realities of war that remain hidden, and the characters seem to ride through tragedy on waves of beatific light, making them seem more gossamer than real. I thought the book was distractingly in love with its own theme.


message 22: by Cheri (new)

Cheri (jovali2) Nothing to Do but Stay: My Pioneer Mother by Carrie Young (3 stars) 35/52

Being a pioneer on the prairie has always seemed one of the most horrendous lives possible, so I picked up this book to see why someone would actually want to do it. The book is not, in fact, a story about the author's mother, but reminiscences of the author's own childhood. I wish she would have explained why her mother, when she was young and unmarried, got a plot to homestead all alone, but that motivation was never explained. Still, the book painted a wonderful picture of family life on the prairie.


message 23: by Cheri (new)

Cheri (jovali2) Your Best Year Yet!: Ten Questions for Making the Next Twelve Months Your Most Successful Ever by Jinny Ditzler (4 stars) 36/52

A friend said this program changed her life and she has used it for quite a few years now. It will be a while before I can evaluate it, but I found the plan well thought out. I like the idea of aligning goals with personal values and the strategies for implementation sound promising.


message 24: by Cheri (new)

Cheri (jovali2) How Carrots Won the Trojan War: Curious (but True) Stories of Common Vegetables by Rebecca Rupp (2 stars)

Such a great title, how could I resist? Sadly, the book is nothing more than a compilation of miscellaneous anecdotes about various vegetables, and the author uses an annoyingly cutesy style throughout. There is no analysis and no consistency about type of information or order of presentation, making it difficult to read and follow. And as for that clever title? All I could find about carrots and the Trojan war was part of one sentence: “It thus must have been an anthocyanin-laced purplish carrot that Agamemnon’s soldiers legendarily munched (presumably quietly) inside the Trojan Horse ‘to bind their bowels’…”. That’s how carrots won the war?


message 25: by Jackie B. - (new)

Jackie B. - Death by Tsundoku (reiwing2040) | 1343 comments Cheri wrote: "That's how carrots won the war?"

How disappointing! I am always sad when something like this happens. I've had a few DNFs this year because of it. I hope your next book really excites you! You deserve a great one after this.


message 26: by Cheri (new)

Cheri (jovali2) Thanks for your sympathy, Jackie! Sounds like you have had the same problem with books your wish you hadn't started. But the good news is that I'm actually reading a great book now, Gut: The Inside Story of Our Body’s Most Underrated Organ by Julia Enders. It sounds like it would be boring and disgusting, but it's actually really exciting and extremely well written. :)


message 27: by Cheri (new)

Cheri (jovali2) Gut : The Inside Story of Our Body's Most Under-Rated Organ by Giulia Enders (5 stars) 38/52

If you eat, this book's for you. Written in a light-hearted tone, the book tells you everything you never knew about your own gut -- including the incredible ways it can affect your mind and behavior. A must read.


message 28: by Cheri (new)

Cheri (jovali2) The Boston Girl by Anita Diamant (3 stars) 39/52

An easy, pleasant read, but the characters had no depth. Explanations were rarely more than clichés, tragedy was glossed over, and everything came up roses. The book seemed like a young adult novel, though it talked down to that audience, too.


message 29: by Cheri (new)

Cheri (jovali2) The Great Transition: Shifting from Fossil Fuels to Solar and Wind Energy by Lester Russell Brown (5 stars) 40/52

This short book did something I did not think was possible -- it gave me a sense of hope, even cautious optimism, about the future. The Great Transition describes the world's current energy status, what changes are already happening, and what actions can help bring positive changes more quickly.


message 30: by Jackie B. - (new)

Jackie B. - Death by Tsundoku (reiwing2040) | 1343 comments Cheri wrote: "This short book did something I did not think was possible -- it gave me a sense of hope, even cautious optimism, about the future. "

This is a great statement! I've officially added this to my TBR. Thanks for sharing.


message 31: by Cheri (new)

Cheri (jovali2) Jackie B. wrote:
This is a great statement! I've officially added..."


Thanks, Jackie! I'm so glad others are reading it.


message 32: by Cheri (new)

Cheri (jovali2) The Assassination of Margaret Thatcher by Hilary Mantel (5 stars) 41/52

The ends meet in this amazing collection of short stories, which are both horrifying yet occasionally so bizarrely funny that they make me vaguely uncomfortable in my own reactions. Mantel writes clear, precise prose with fresh (and sometimes freaky) images that make it impossible not to finish a story once started. My paperback has the addition of a new story called "The School of English" that is worth seeking out if your edition does not contain it.


message 33: by Cheri (new)

Cheri (jovali2) Jane and Prudence by Barbara Pym (3 stars) 42/52

I last read a Barbara Pym novel (Crampton Hodnet) some twenty years ago and remember it as a mildly amusing look at life in the not-too-distant past. As I read Jane and Prudence, the wry humor of individual scenes was swamped by the general sadness of the characters' lives. Jane is incompetent at -- and uninterested in -- her "chosen" "profession" of vicar's wife, and blunders through her daily situation while day dreaming and fantasizing. Unmarried Prudence goes from one love affair to another, some partly real and others totally imaginary. I wish the book had been either more pleasantly funny or more pointed in its satire; it seemed to fall unsatisfyingly between these two.


message 34: by Cassandra (new)

Cassandra | 5832 comments Thank you, Cheri, for reminding me to read The Assassination of Margaret Thatcher: Stories. I just put it on hold at my library for my short story challenge next month.

Great job on your challenge, by the way.


message 35: by Cheri (new)

Cheri (jovali2) Cassandra wrote: "Thank you, Cheri, for reminding me to read The Assassination of Margaret Thatcher: Stories. I just put it on hold at my library for my short story challenge next month.

Great job o..."


Thanks, Cassandra! And many thanks to you for moderating. :)

Also, there's a wonderful interview with Hilary Mantel that gives some great info about her life, and many of the details pop up in The Assassination of Margaret Thatcher. I recommend it:
http://www.theparisreview.org/intervi...


message 36: by Cheri (new)

Cheri (jovali2) Dubliners by James Joyce (4 stars) 43/52

I had the privilege of reading this book in a class taught by a Joyce scholar. Without her guidance and great class discussions, I know I would have missed a tremendous amount in these stories. Even so, I had had enough of Joyce by the time I finished the book. I found it hard to relate, over and over again, to the Irish situation, and although I found Joyce extremely clever, and I couldn't always see why it was necessary to use all the tricks and devices that he did. I responded emotionally to a few of the stories, but many I could appreciate only intellectually -- and after a lot of work!


message 37: by Cassandra (new)

Cassandra | 5832 comments Thanks for the link! I'll check it out.

I started The Assassination of Margaret Thatcher: Stories last night. I've only finished the first two stories, but they are really interesting. They seem so normal, but there are some bizarre things that call all of your assumptions into questions. I felt like I had to stop midway through and think for a bit before I could keep going. I'm excited to read the rest of the stories!


message 38: by Cheri (new)

Cheri (jovali2) Happy Money: The Science of Smarter Spending by Elizabeth Dunn & Michael Norton (4 stars) 44/52

Happy Money is fun and easy to read, and very inspiring. We think we know how to spend our money to make ourselves happy, and sometimes we do. But sometimes, we don't -- and even when we do, we often do something else instead. These two psychologists explore five basic strategies to help us use our money in ways that will make us happier. All of the strategies are based on well-researched aspects of human behavior that the authors explain with lots of examples and suggestions for implementing these principles every day, no matter what our income.


message 39: by Cheri (new)

Cheri (jovali2) The Riddle of the Labyrinth: The Quest to Crack an Ancient Code by Margalit Fox (5 stars) 45/52

Real life mysteries are the best, especially when they are told as well as this one is. Margalit Fox does an excellent job weaving together the excitement of the discovery of Linear B, the power plays of those in control of the tablets, the personalities of the people involved, and the consummate devotion of Alice Kober to the task of deciphering. I was particularly moved by the challenges Kober faced (and her reactions to them) simply because she was a woman. Remarkably, Fox is also able to explain to a novice reader how these scholars went about breaking the code of an unknown script in an unknown language with no Rosetta stone to help.


message 40: by Cheri (new)

Cheri (jovali2) Stoner by John Williams (4 stars) 46/52

I don't know exactly what I think of this novel, but I find myself thinking about it, which itself is a good thing. I love the clear, beautifully wrought prose; there is never a sense that the author is showing off, or even that there is an author -- there is just the story. The reviews have made much of Stoner's passion, which I did not think was central to the book, and I felt that Stoner's belief that the university was apart from the world was a false dichotomy, a cliché. For me, the strength of the book lies in sharing the experience of Stoner's struggles. He was sometimes too passive, sometimes inexplicably bold, yet he always felt real. I did not either like or dislike him, but I felt I knew him.


message 41: by Cheri (new)

Cheri (jovali2) Waste-Free Kitchen Handbook: A Guide to Eating Well and Saving Money By Wasting Less Food by Dana Gunders (4 stars) 47/52

I've been trying to reduce waste in my kitchen, and this book provides many helpful and creative ways to do just that. It also gives background and statistics on the issue, like greenhouse gas emissions from wasted food. What it doesn't do is follow through on the implications of some of its claims: It points out the huge amount of resources necessary to raise livestock, but never suggests reducing meat consumption as a possible strategy to decrease food waste (not even in the section on "reducing waste up the chain"!). That's the elephant in the room that needs to be addressed.


message 42: by Cheri (new)

Cheri (jovali2) Happy All the Time by Laurie Colwin (3 stars) 48/52

Enjoyable read with interesting if not very realistic characters. Not much happens. The characters seem to learn a thing or two, but I'm not sure the reader does.


message 43: by Cheri (new)

Cheri (jovali2) Every Person on the Planet: An Only Somewhat Anxiety-Filled Tale for the Holidays by Bruce Eric Kaplan (3 stars) 49/52

A friend of mine likes to bring this for the hosts when she goes to a holiday party, and it's perfect for that. I enjoyed the illustrations and the wry humor, but it wasn't laugh-out-loud funny.


message 44: by Cheri (new)

Cheri (jovali2) Suffer the Little Children by Donna Leon (3 stars) 50/52

I have read many books in this wonderful series, but this one left me unsatisfied. No spoilers, I will just say that it is darker than most of the others, and it seemed to shift focus.


message 45: by Cheri (new)

Cheri (jovali2) The Testament of Mary by Colm Tóibín (4 stars) 51/52

I listened to the audio book and really lucked out -- it's read by Meryl Streep! The book presents the testament of Mary, the mother of Jesus, but in this re-telling she never accepts the now familiar Christian belief that Jesus was the son of God. She sees his followers as blind zealots who, after his death, want her to revise her story of what she saw. It's an interesting concept that is nicely presented. For me the most interesting part, not fully developed in the book, were the few hints thrown out of what Jesus thought of himself. The story deserves a long treatment than it got here.


message 46: by Cheri (new)

Cheri (jovali2) CHALLENGE COMPLETED!!!

Mislaid by Nell Zink (4 stars) 52/52

Clever, funny -- a hilarious send-up of race and gender and any other label we use to define each other. It gets a little ridiculous (and occasionally annoying), but it's witty enough to be worth it.


message 47: by Alison (new)

Alison G. (agriff22) | 1083 comments congrats!! good job!


message 48: by Cheri (new)

Cheri (jovali2) Alison wrote: "congrats!! good job!"

Thanks, Alison! For awhile there I wasn't sure I'd make it!


message 49: by Cassandra (new)

Cassandra | 5832 comments Congratulations, Cheri! :)


message 50: by Cheri (new)

Cheri (jovali2) Cassandra wrote: "Congratulations, Cheri! :)"
Thank you! And thanks so much for moderating -- without you and the other mods, there wouldn't be a challenge for the rest of us. Really appreciate all your work on our behalf.


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