The Humour Club discussion

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message 1: by Terry (new)

Terry Ravenscroft (terryrazz) | 6 comments I'm new to Goodreads. I am wondering if any fellow authors of The Humour Club have had any success with using Goodreads as a marketing tool for their books. I'm thinking in particular of Giveaways and advertising.


message 2: by Joe (new)

Joe Cawley (joecawley) | 9 comments I've tried advertising and events but to be honest neither have worked for me. Not tried a giveaway yet, but it's a possibilty.


message 3: by Lisa (new)

Lisa Shiroff | 840 comments I tried advertising and a give-a-way. Combined they resulted in 330 people adding the book to their to-read pile, which had zero impact on my sales.


message 4: by Terry (new)

Terry Ravenscroft (terryrazz) | 6 comments That's what is troubling me, Lisa. It's all very well being added to 'books to read', the problem is will they ever get round to reading them? Time will tell I suppose. To be fair you can hardly expect someone to buy your book immediately after earmarking it.


message 5: by Lisa (new)

Lisa Shiroff | 840 comments Amen! And that's one of the benefits of the brick and mortar stores. You bought your to-be-read books and stacked them bedside.


message 6: by Rebecca (new)

Rebecca Douglass (rdouglass) | 2420 comments Mod
Lisa wrote: "Amen! And that's one of the benefits of the brick and mortar stores. You bought your to-be-read books and stacked them bedside."

Isn't that the truth!

When you enter a Giveaway, the default is to add the book to your to-read folder. But I'm sure many of us enter giveaways for books we won't buy. And I usually don't remember later what I entered (unless I win. Which I finally did, and now have a real book added to the pile, one I feel obligated to read and review).


message 7: by Will (new)

Will Macmillan Jones (willmacmillanjones) | 510 comments I see the occasional author making real headway, whilst the rest of us languish.

But I can't honestly see where the marketing differences lie.


message 8: by Lisa (new)

Lisa Shiroff | 840 comments I don't think anyone knows where the marketing differences lie. I pretended I had big budget and actually called professional book marketing companies and asked specifically what each would do for me. Some do old-fashioned print ads, some even do billboards, some try to get you into local media as a start and to branch out from there. None of them thought social media was effective (which I had always suspected). Every one of them said the important thing was to somehow get enough people talking about it because word of mouth seems to be the best way. Of course none of them could guarantee a way to do that.


message 9: by Lisa (new)

Lisa Shiroff | 840 comments Oh, but wait! I think I may have just stumbled on the elusive answer. Though now that it's in the newspaper I suppose it's no longer illusive. Here it is: Scientists find secret to writing a best-selling novel
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/technology...


message 10: by Will (new)

Will Macmillan Jones (willmacmillanjones) | 510 comments Next article: how they define 'Interestingness' and when they hope to add the word to dictionaries...


message 11: by Lisa (new)

Lisa Shiroff | 840 comments I thought maybe that was another Britishism that went over my head. Happens to me all the time when I watch Graham Norton. Recently he said something about being "papped." I couldn't understand why he was at the gynecologist's office. Now I know it means being photographed by the paparazzi.


message 12: by Joel (new)

Joel Bresler | 1545 comments Mod
Lisa, I worry about you. Good catch on that Telegraph article, though. It had interestingness.


message 13: by Jonny (new)

Jonny Gibbings (jonnygibbings) | 29 comments I've not found Goodreads useful for marketing to be honest. It's great for finding new reads, but I get a bit pissed-off when authors spam their work all the time, so I'm not so inclined to push my books as don't want to fall into that type of author.


message 14: by Will (new)

Will Macmillan Jones (willmacmillanjones) | 510 comments Most groups have section for authors to plug new books, and here it is very wise to confine yourself to those. Does it work? Who knows.


message 15: by Rebecca (new)

Rebecca Douglass (rdouglass) | 2420 comments Mod
Will wrote: "Most groups have section for authors to plug new books, and here it is very wise to confine yourself to those. Does it work? Who knows."

I sort of suspect it doesn't. I personally don't spend a lot of time looking at the "plug your works here" threads.


message 16: by Jonny (new)

Jonny Gibbings (jonnygibbings) | 29 comments Exactly! Th thread goes from 1 to 100,000 in about a second.


message 17: by T.A. (new)

T.A. Williams (goodreadscomtawilliams) | 13 comments Better late than never. I have just joined the group so please forgive me for coming to this after a two-month delay. I'm very interested in your comments. I have a contract with the Harlequin digital imprint, Carina UK. Since day one they have been very insistent about social media as the best way of promoting the books. Goodreads, I believe, is now owned by Amazon and so I can see how there could be some cross fertilisation between the two. However, I haven't come across any so far. I think the honest truth is that promotion via social media achieves two aims as far as the publisher is concerned: it doesn't cost anything and they don't have to do it. The onus falls on the author. And anyway, it might just work. I sometimes wonder whether sandwich boards, a bell and a good position on a street corner might achieve more.


message 18: by Will (new)

Will Macmillan Jones (willmacmillanjones) | 510 comments Having a squee moment.

In the UK Amazon, for teen>YA>Lit>humorous, I've got spots #25, #26 and #29.


message 19: by Rebecca (new)

Rebecca Douglass (rdouglass) | 2420 comments Mod
Will wrote: "Having a squee moment.

In the UK Amazon, for teen>YA>Lit>humorous, I've got spots #25, #26 and #29."


That's great! I'm just excited when I get a single sale in the UK or EU. Not to mention Australia.


message 20: by Will (new)

Will Macmillan Jones (willmacmillanjones) | 510 comments I just wish I knew what I'd done to get that.


message 21: by Rebecca (new)

Rebecca Douglass (rdouglass) | 2420 comments Mod
Will wrote: "I just wish I knew what I'd done to get that."

Well, maybe partly you wrote humorous YA novels. My take is that way too much YA is so deadly serious (or fully of seriously amorous vampires) that you probably dominate the category! And then you wrote good books. But how you managed to get people to discover that, well, when you figure it out, do share!


message 22: by T.J. (new)

T.J. Brown | 17 comments just did my giveaway. Finished on Friday and 1 sale by Sunday.

To be honest it's a long game is it not. The people that have see it may be reminded later, who knows. No publicity is bad so it's worth a go.


message 23: by Will (new)

Will Macmillan Jones (willmacmillanjones) | 510 comments And it's all still about getting new product out there.

Every sale is a prospective buyer for the next book you release. It only takes one to take off properly, and everything will start selling.


message 24: by Guy (new)

Guy Portman (guyportman) | 348 comments I've run two giveaways on goodreads. They are undoubtedly fantastic for exposure. However so many goodreads members to-read lists are so long, one can't assume your book will ever make it off their lists, unless something happens to convince them to do so.


message 25: by Rebecca (new)

Rebecca Douglass (rdouglass) | 2420 comments Mod
Guy wrote: "I've run two giveaways on goodreads. They are undoubtedly fantastic for exposure. However so many goodreads members to-read lists are so long, one can't assume your book will ever make it off the..."

Totally true. I'm one of those with the huge list. Plus, with GR now making adding giveaway books to your TBR list the default, many people are "adding" it who have very little interest in reading it (unless they win it).


message 26: by Will (new)

Will Macmillan Jones (willmacmillanjones) | 510 comments That's really why I don't do GR give aways.

And my Teen/YA/humour success only lasted a few days.

I soon slumped back into the normal depths.


message 27: by Rebecca (new)

Rebecca Douglass (rdouglass) | 2420 comments Mod
I notice that the numbers on my book shift up and down daily--some people must actually clean out their lists or something? (You know--that number on your dashboard that says how many people have added it).

Really, the only ones that mean anything are the reviews and ratings. And sales.


message 28: by Corey (new)

Corey Lamb (officialcoreylamb) | 4 comments As an indie author on a budget, I found GR to be the best marketing place for my short horror/comedy piece (that is, in comparison to any other social media outlets). Not that I've had any kind of great success, but most of the sales that I've made came from GR connections. And I'm not talking about plugging my book in every thread I visit (that's probably a good way to get people NOT to read your book). But just talking to other readers in the genre and casually mentioning my book has gotten me some extra sales here and there. Nothing to quit my day job over, but a sale is a sale.

I've also found minor success in Amazon's Kindle Select program. I had a huge surge in downloads during my first promo period and reached #1 status in both humor and satire categories, which I was extremely happy about. Of course, it only barely bumped my regular sales numbers, but I got a few solid reviews out of it :)


message 29: by Joel (new)

Joel Bresler | 1545 comments Mod
I'm experiencing something of a reverse-success story. I have been running a Goodreads Giveaway, and the number of entrants has been going backward. Do you think they know something?


message 30: by Rebecca (new)

Rebecca Douglass (rdouglass) | 2420 comments Mod
I think GR is having troubles with its stats. The number of people who have added (and rated) my books keeps going up and down, and not just by a couple as usual, but by as many as 50.


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