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The awakening

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message 1: by Qinqin (new)

Qinqin This book is a little hard to read for me because there are a lot of words I don't know. But when I understand this book, I had a feeling that the book's atmosphere is so heavy. Edna is a women who awaked on 19th. She has a husband but without love; She has a lover but without brave. She don't wants to be the women who is no right. She feeling depressed everyday and she choose to finish her life at the end of the story.


Paula That's a good brief synopsis of the book. But it is also a commentary on men and women's roles in society, depression, marriage, and more. I seem to read this book every ten years and glean New insights from it. Kate Chopin was a brilliant writer.


Elisabet You might want to read a brief biography on Kate Chopin and the status of women in that era. You will better understand her novels. The Awakening is one of my favorite stories and then The Story of an Hour.


message 4: by Baumspecht (last edited May 15, 2014 12:39AM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Baumspecht (Throwing pearls to the pigs...)

You Americans are mostly still living in the 18th century...in your behaviour and in your conveyed world of thought, influenced by phantastic religious fary tales...

We, as Europeans, estimate Mrs Chopin as one of the very few US American who learned something from life...

And she discribes it in a fantastic way.

She is far ahead of where the majority of US Americans are even today. Standing still, emprisoned in chains of archaic structures...of anxiety and warfare..

And, sure, you have no education to understand her dictus...


message 5: by Sheila (last edited May 15, 2014 06:48AM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Sheila Baumspecht wrote: "(Throwing pearls to the pigs...)

You Americans are mostly still living in the 18th century...in your behaviour and in your conveyed world of thought, influenced by phantastic religious fary tales...."


Not here to make friends, are you?

By the way, she doesn't "discribe" it. She describes it.


Naomi Sheila wrote: "Baumspecht wrote: "(Throwing pearls to the pigs...)

You Americans are mostly still living in the 18th century...in your behaviour and in your conveyed world of thought, influenced by phantastic re..."


Ha-ha...OMG too funny Sheila.

Thars no way tat you can no tat cents we r all uneducumated.


Paula Baumspecht. I am still awaiting my pearls, of wisdom on The Awakening from you. Oh Europa please give us our education, we anxiously await to be awakened.


Sheila Paula wrote: "Baumspecht. I am still awaiting my pearls, of wisdom on The Awakening from you. Oh Europa please give us our education, we anxiously await to be awakened."

Europa might want to send someone a little more well-versed in English to lecture us on our ignorance.


Kallie Baumspecht wrote: "(Throwing pearls to the pigs...)We, as Europeans, estimate Mrs Chopin as one of the very few US American who learned something from life..."

Apparently you haven't read many American writers but were just waiting for an opportunity to spew your vitriol. Subsequent American woman writers have Chopin (among others) to thank, that is for sure; but many have proved worthy of her legacy.


Kallie Qinqin wrote: "This book is a little hard to read for me because there are a lot of words I don't know. But when I understand this book, I had a feeling that the book's atmosphere is so heavy. Edna is a women who..."

There was no place for Edna in that American society. She would have had to abandon her children and move to a big city, and even there would have found scant room for a Bohemian woman. That is the conclusion I drew. Reactions to The Awakening (previously a successful writer, Chopin was shunned for that book) proved Chopin's point.


message 11: by Feliks (last edited May 15, 2014 10:49AM) (new) - rated it 1 star

Feliks America, socially backward?! What?

But--but--we're first in laser-guided missile systems!


Kallie Feliks wrote: "America, socially backward?! What?

But--but--we're first in laser-guided missile systems!"


And this has 'What!?!' to do with 'The Awakening' and those who admire the book enough to begin a thread discussing it?


Feliks Kallie wrote: "And this has 'What!?!' to do with 'The Awakening' and those who admire the book enough to..."

Easily answered. My comment has mainly to do with being a reply to this, earlier comment:

Baumspecht wrote: "(Throwing pearls to the pigs...)

You Americans are mostly still living in the 18th century...in your behaviour and in your conveyed world of thought, influenced by phantastic religious fary tales...."


I thought it was pretty clear. Guess I should have quoted him specifically.


message 14: by Sheila (last edited May 16, 2014 12:53PM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Sheila In other words, Kallie, Feliks's comment has no specific meaning at all.

He won't just say he agrees with Baumspecht, but I think that's what he's trying to imply for us.


Feliks It was just a bit of levity. No need to try to infer anything else good-or-bad.


Paula And Feliks we invented the ice cream cone. Americanism get no credit at all. And I still want my pearls. ;)


Kallie Feliks wrote: "It was just a bit of levity. No need to try to infer anything else good-or-bad."

Calling people swine on the basis of their nationality is just too reminiscent of genocide justification. We've been guilty of that too, but this is a book discussion thread, for heaven's sake.


Paula Absolutely


message 19: by Scott (new) - rated it 1 star

Scott Well, that escalated quickly.


Paula And now extinguished quickly. KATE Chopin is also the author of wonderful short stories involving Creole life in Louisiana. If you haven't read them I highly recommend them. Perfect thoughtful summer reading.


Kallie Paula wrote: "And now extinguished quickly. KATE Chopin is also the author of wonderful short stories involving Creole life in Louisiana. If you haven't read them I highly recommend them. Perfect thoughtful ..."
I have read some of them; they are wonderful regional stories. Chopin was great at evoking sensual detail.


Paula Kallie wrote: Chopin was great at evoking sensual detail.

I agree. She also approached the very taboo topics of women's feelings regarding men, marriage, children, family,and the self. This was why she was so controversial then and may be why she is difficult to read now.


Kallie Paula wrote: "Kallie wrote: Chopin was great at evoking sensual detail.

I agree. She also approached the very taboo topics of women's feelings regarding men, marriage, children, family,and the self. This wa..."


Yes and revealing taboo feelings can be of great value, especially for people who don't hold the power in society. In spite or because of of that (and other, literary qualities) her work still resonates with so many people that we still read and discuss her stories and novels.


message 24: by Liz (last edited Jun 03, 2014 10:55AM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Liz Nix Okay, this book is absolutely one of my favorite books of all time. I am surprised there are not more discussions surrounding this book and the themes involved.

Kallie, you are so right that Chopin was great at evoking sensual detail. I kept exclaiming to my husband that somewhere authors have lost the ability to be sensual and erotic without actually depicting anything sexual. She is brilliant with her words and with her themes.

One thing that I have noticed about the idea of feminism is that although things have changed in many ways, we have compensated for the original oppression by the sexualization of the female figure.

In the US at least, the women that Chopin describes, would never be considered beautiful. It's amazing to me that women have now been given status as almost equal to men, but now the sexism that exists is that we cannot allow for a woman's natural beauty. We are overrun with what is considered beautiful or sexy, and I think it creates an altogether new dimension of sexism. Don't get me wrong, male models are just as unlikely to be the average man as female models are the average woman. However, I feel that men have less pressure to fit into the physical mold that we have given them. What are everyone else's thought on that?


Kallie Liz wrote: "It's amazing to me that women have now been given status as almost equal to men, but now the sexism that exists is that we cannot allow for a woman's natural beauty. We are overrun with what is considered beautiful or sexy, and I think it creates an altogether new dimension of sexism. "

This is true, and I do think it's mainly the case here in the U.S., as you say. I've traveled in other countries where people have much more inclusive, diverse concepts of beauty.


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