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Disturbing

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Christopher Johnston 1) Through the early stages of the book, the chief of police is shown to bend rules were people he thinks are assholes are treated in a much harsher manner than normal decent folk - see the goading incident at the domestic he attends. Abigail, although leading a private life, knows what is going in the town.

2) The chief of police visits Abigail's home basically to say hello but masks the visit as an issue of police business. At this meeting, Abigail clearly states she does not want to see, much less have a relationship with the chief of police

3) Abigail agrees to spend some time with the chief of police and eventually has sex with him as she thinks it will make him go away.

Thats equals rape.


Tarri As I read the story, I would say that Abigail is the one who suggested sex to Brooks and in her mind it is because she thinks he will "go away".

Also, Brooks only went the first time while on duty and that was to find out why she was carrying a gun and what was wrong. To me that speaks of someone who is serious about his community.


message 3: by Moonlight (last edited Feb 17, 2014 11:00AM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Moonlight Rape occurs when a person is forced though violence or threats of violence to submit to a sexual act. It can also occur when a victim is incapable of understanding what is happening to them. For example, if someone is under the influence of drugs or alcohol, is of diminished mental capacity, or is under the age of consent, it is considered rape even if they do not say no.

Brooks visits Abigail because she is carrying a concealed weapon and he wants to ascertain if she is doing so within the law. Shortly thereafter he begins to suspect that she is armed and hiding because she is afraid despite her denials. He suspects she might be hiding from a stalking ex.

Violent ex's account for the vast majority of homicides of women who would otherwise be at low risk for violent crimes. Frequently, when an ex attacks his former wife or girlfriend, he harms the people around her. That includes family members, friends, coworkers, total strangers who are bystanders and responding police officers. Any good police officer would want to know about a situation like this in his jurisdiction.

So who exactly is suppose to be the victim and who the perpetrator in this book? There were no threats of violence or physical violence between Abigail and the Brooks. There was no coercion. No one had sex against their will.


Stacie I don't think there is anything wrong with Brooks. He never threatened Abigail in anyway. Certainly not rape.


message 5: by Jen (last edited Feb 23, 2014 07:44AM) (new) - rated it 2 stars

Jen I don't think Abigail was raped at all, but it did disturb me that Brooks first shows up at Abigail's door to question her about her guns and then comes back as a 'suitor' -- after she told him she was fine and wanted to be alone. He was essentially using his power as the police chief to harass her. Yes, he had the right to look into her situation, but he should have kept it at that, and not started pushing his way into her life on a personal basis. His family does talk about Brooks' tendency to push and push until he gets what he wants, but I didn't find him charming. I hated him.


Moonlight Back when Jeffry Dahmer was arrested, it was revealed that police had spoken to him about a young man who was under the influence and who Dahmer wanted to "take home". Dahmer killed the young man as soon as the police left. Many critics demanded to know why the police did do more to protect the young victim.

In the absence of an obvious crime, the police simply ask questions to understand the behavior they are observe. If they are at all good at what they do, they will always push for an explanation to behavior they do not understand until they determine the cause is innocent and not the result of a victim too frightened to ask for help or a perpetrator trying to conceal a crime.

Brooks behavior didn't strike me as out of character given who he was suppose to be. And in my limited experience with law enforcement, if you act like you've got something to hide, they are really going to push till they find out what it is.


message 7: by Jen (new) - rated it 2 stars

Jen Moonlight wrote: "Back when Jeffry Dahmer was arrested, it was revealed that police had spoken to him about a young man who was under the influence and who Dahmer wanted to "take home". Dahmer killed the young man ..."

I agree, and I see nothing wrong with Brooks investigating Abigail -- as a police officer. He should have kept it that way, but he didn't. He showed up at her door with gifts and invited himself in on a social level. Then he kept pushing on a social level, slept with her, and still kept pushing. This is unethical. Then, when he announced to his family that he was marrying Abigail, his mother took over Abigail's life and started planning a huge wedding, which Abigail didn't need. Essentially, Brooks and his family took over from Abigail's mother, and now run her life like Mom did, so it wasn't just a matter of Brooks being concerned about Abigail's safety from the position of a police officer. It goes far beyond that.


Tarri Cops have to date someone. :-) I read/listened (to) it as if the first time he went to see her it was as a cop, after that it was purely social.


message 9: by Jen (new) - rated it 2 stars

Jen "Cops have to date someone. :-) I read/listened (to) it as if the first time he went to see her it was as a cop, after that it was purely social."

That's not how I read it. He sees Abigail with her gun and her dog, and he immediately thinks she needs his help. Abigail has not only been surviving for years on her own, but has become a rich and successful security designer, but of course she needs the protection of a man. So Brooks interviews her, as a cop, and that's fine, that's his job, but because she doesn't throw herself into his arms crying 'save me!, and explain everything, he becomes more suspicious, and that's when he goes back with a bottle of wine and invites himself in. She has the right to her privacy, and he doesn't have the right to invade her home without a warrant, but she's polite, and of course he starts all this 'What are you afraid of?' crap, so what's she supposed to do? If she says no and shuts the door in his face, he'll just get more suspicious and keep on harassing her, so she gives in, as he knew she would. He's a manipulative creep, is what he is. If a police officer came to my door to ask questions, and then showed up the next day with wine and invited himself in, I'd call the police station to report him, but then Brooks is the police chief, so who can she report him to? This is him using his power and authority to push his way into her life and her bed, and figure out what her 'problem' is, and that's not purely social at all, it's unethical.


message 10: by [deleted user] (new)

Wow, what a discussion. I saw a mutual attraction. A man interested in a woman pursues her. Because of her background she is unfamiliar with the interaction and is afraid to share herself with anyone. She is so literal she saw sex as a means to an end as with her other sexual encounters. Through him she was able to experience making love instead of just the act of sex. He gave her a chance at living instead of just having life. He gave a family and friends. I believe if Abigail had said no sex, there would have been none.


message 11: by Jen (last edited Jul 19, 2014 03:52PM) (new) - rated it 2 stars

Jen Brigitta wrote: "Wow, what a discussion. I saw a mutual attraction. A man interested in a woman pursues her. Because of her background she is unfamiliar with the interaction and is afraid to share herself with anyo..."


I would agree with you if he'd been anyone but the police chief who had just tried to push his way into her life to investigate her. Or if he'd pursued friendship with her first. Instead, right after she told him to buzz off, he shows up at her door with wine and invites himself in. He and his family push their way into her life, and doing so they behave much as her mother had done. She just trades her dominating mother for a dominating husband and inlaws. How is that better? I'm sorry, but you're making excuses for a horrible book by ignoring a lot of details.

"Because of her background she is unfamiliar with the interaction and is afraid to share herself with anyone." And why should she have to 'share herself' with some total stranger who shows up at her door. I don't have her background, and I wouldn't share the story of my life with any stranger who pushes their way into it.

Also, all the people in this discussion who are arguing that Brooks only behaved properly are forgetting that crossover between police officer and suitor. It's good for Brooks to investigate a disturbing situation, though why he instantly jumped into interrogative mode as soon as he saw Abigail bugs me. Woman on her own with big dog equals suspicious circumstances. If she'd been a man would he have pushed like that? I think not.

And sure, I agree that a man interested in a woman asking her for a date is fine. But police officer jumping up to interrogate woman on her own with big dog then turning right around and pursuing her the next day is disturbing. It's not completely abusive, but bordering on it. I've finished with Nora Roberts. This was the last of her books I'm ever reading, because she does too much of this kind of thing for my tastes.


Sarah Jen wrote: "Brigitta wrote: "Wow, what a discussion. I saw a mutual attraction. A man interested in a woman pursues her. Because of her background she is unfamiliar with the interaction and is afraid to share ..."

I have to agree with Brigitta - I'm totally taken aback by the direction of all these posts. I would never had looked at any of the action in the book from this perspective - and now that I've considered it, I still don't agree. Abigail is a strong character; so is Brooks. I think they came together in a way that worked for them. And as for the "manipulation" that was addressed earlier during the scene with Ty - I just don't see anything wrong with that. He made sure that someone who needed help got it. Sheesh.


message 13: by [deleted user] (new)

I gave the book more thought and all I could come up with is that Brooks was dedicated to Abigail. I think it was a wonderful love story.


Tarri I agree, Brigitta. I saw no hint of abuse of power with Brooks.


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