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message 1: by Book Concierge (last edited Dec 12, 2020 01:27PM) (new)

Book Concierge (tessabookconcierge) | 414 comments 100-book challenge

I will probably substitute a couple of titles from the original. Have noted those I've previously read, and probably will not re-read.

1. Anne of Green Gables by Lucy Maud Montgomery
2. Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen
3. Outlander ✔ – 02Aug14
4. To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee - ✔ 13July15 - 5***** and a ❤
5. A Fine Balance by Rohinton Mistry
6. 1984 by George Orwell
7. Gone with the Wind by Margaret Mitchell
8. Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire by J.K. Rowling
9. The Return of the King by J.R.R. Tolkien
10. Fall on Your Knees by Ann-Marie MacDonald
11.Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows by J.K. Rowling
12. Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte
13. Little Women by L.M. Alcott
14. The Fellowship of the Ring by J.R.R. Tolkien
15. The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck
16. The Time Traveler's Wife by Audrey Niffenegger
17. Angela's Ashes by Frank McCourt
18. Dracula by Bram Stoker - ✔ – 20Oct16
19. Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone by J.K. Rowling
20. Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban by J.K. Rowling
21. Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix by J.K. Rowling
22. Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince by J.K. Rowling
23. Life of Pi by Yann Martel
24. Lonesome Dove by Larry McMurty
25. The Two Towers by J.R.R. Tolkien
26. Love You Forever by Robert Munsch - ✔ 13Apr16
27. Matilda by Roald Dahl
28. Persuasion by Jane Austen
29. The Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger
30.The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe by C.S. Lewis
31. The Poisonwood Bible by Barabra Kingsolver
32.The Stone Angel by Margaret Laurence
33. A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens - ✔ – 26 Jan 15
34.Angus, Thongs and Full-Frontal Snogging by Louise Rennison The Awakening by Kate Chopin - ✔ 13Feb14
35. Blindness by Jose Saramago
36. Emma by Jane Austen
37. Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets by J.K. Rowling
38. Hoot by Carl Hiaasen
39. Jurassic Park by Micheal Crichton
40. Memoirs of a Geisha by Arthur Golden
41.On the Road by Jack Kerouac
42. Roots by Alex Haley - ✔ 12Apr16
43. The Bible The Prince of Tides by Pat Conroy ✔ – 19Feb14
44. The Clan of the Cave Bear by Jean M. Auel
45.The Golden Compass by Phillip Pullman
46. The Handmaid's Tale by Margaret Atwood
47. The Husband by Dean Koontz - ✔ - 22Jan17
48.The Lizard Cage by Karen Connelly
49. The Outsiders by S.E. Hinton - ✔ – 22May14
50. The Secret Garden by Frances Hodgson Burnett
51. The Stand by Stephen King
52. The Thirteenth Tale by Diane Setterfield
53. Water for Elephants by Sara Gruen
54. A Million Little Pieces by James Frey A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court ✔ – 16April14
55. A Room with a View by E.M. Forster
56. A Wrinkle in Time by Madeleine L’Engle
57. Year of Wonders by Geraldine Brooks
58. Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy - ✔ - 26Oct15
59. Atlas Shrugged by Ayn Rand Brave New World by Aldous Huxley ✔ – 23April14
60. Charlie and the Chocolate Factory by Roald Dahl - ✔ 29Jan16
61.Cirque de Freak by Darren Shan
62. Confessions of a Shopaholic by Sophie Kinsella
63.David Copperfield by Charles Dickens
64.Deadly Appearances by Gail Bowen
65.Eragon by Christopher Paolini - ✔ – 04July17
66.Exodus by Leon Uris - ✔ 14Feb17
67. Expecting Adam by Martha Beck - ✔ – 26Apr17
68.Five Smooth Stones by Anne Fairbairn
69.Jack Maggs by Peter Carey
70.Jennie: The Life of Lady Randolph Churchill by Ralph Martin
71. Little House on the Prairie by Laura Ingalls Wilder
72. Lucky Jim by Kingsley Amis - ✔ 12Apr18
73. Murder Must Advertise by Dorothy L. Sayers - #&10004 07Oct15
74. My Sister's Keeper by Jodi Picoult
75.Nineteen Minutes by Jodi Picoult
76.North and South by John Jakes
77.Not Wanted on the Voyage by Timothy Findley
78. One Hundred Years of Solitude by Gabriel Garcia Marquez
79. Sabriel by Garth Nix ✔ – 06July15
80. Scarlet Feather by Maeve Binchy ✔ – 15April14
81. Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen
82.Shadow of the Moon by M.M. Kaye
83. Tess of the d'Urbervilles by Thomas Hardy
84.The Bourne Identity by Robert Ludlum
85.The Cure for Death by Lightning by Gail Anderson-Dargatz
86.The Englishman’s Boy by Guy Vanderhaeghe
87. The Good Earth by Pearl S. Buck
88. The Fountainhead by Ayn Rand A Town Like Alice ✔ – 05Aug14
89. Journey to the River Sea by Eva Ibbotson - ✔ – 15Oct16
90. The Lovely Bones by Alice Sebold
91.The No. 1 Ladies' Detective Agency by Alexander McCall Smith
92.The Red Tent by Anita Diamant
93.The Secret Life of Bees by Sue Monk Kidd
94.The Shell Seekers by Rosamunde Pilcher
95.Swallows of Kabul ✔ – 12 Nov 14
96.The Way the Crow Flies by Ann-Marie MacDonald
97.True History f the Kelly Gang by Peter Carey
98.What Came Before He Shot Her by Elizabeth George
99.Without Remorse by Tom Clancy
100. Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings ✔ – 17Sept14


message 2: by Book Concierge (last edited Feb 28, 2014 08:44AM) (new)

Book Concierge (tessabookconcierge) | 414 comments So as I join the group, I've read 52 of these titles.

I am going to find other books to substitute for the following (which I have absolutely no desire to read)

34.Angus, Thongs and Full-Frontal Snogging by Louise Rennison
43.The Bible
54.A Million Little Pieces by James Frey
59.Atlas Shrugged by Ayn Rand
88.The Fountainhead by Ayn Rand
100.Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte

Angus, Thongs and Full-Frontal Snogging sounds like the worst kind of chick-lit supposed humor. I'd sooner kiss a sheep!

Have no desire to read The Bible as leisure reading.

Have no desire to add to James Frey's coffers by reading a book that was clearly shown to be fabrication.

I tried Ayn Rand in college when she was all the rage. Couldn't get past page 50 of The Fountainhead ... when my F2F book club decided to read Atlas Shrugged a few years back, I tried again. Couldn't stomach it.

I tried Wuthering Heights in high school and hated it ... the Cliff's note (now called Sparks notes) saved my bacon.

Have to decide what books I'll substitute ... I'll be back


message 3: by Louise (new)

Louise You've read all the Harry Potter books except Deathly Hallows?! You need to fix that! (I'm sorry, Harry Potter is my childhood - and teenhood - and probably a way bigger part of my adulthood than is entirely healthy...)

Impressive amount of books read there though. Got any favourites?


message 4: by Book Concierge (new)

Book Concierge (tessabookconcierge) | 414 comments Louise wrote: "You've read all the Harry Potter books except Deathly Hallows?! You need to fix that! (I'm sorry, Harry Potter is my childhood - and teenhood - and probably a way bigger part of my adulthood than i..."

Louise .. I'm in my 60s and not inclined to read that last HP book ... but if I need it for a challenge, who knows?

My all-time favorite book is To Kill a Mockingbird - I've read it at least 20 times since I first read it at age 13 (back when it was a relatively NEW book!).


message 5: by Book Concierge (new)

Book Concierge (tessabookconcierge) | 414 comments First substitution:
#34 Angus, Thongs and Full-Frontal Snogging by Louise Rennison

Finished reading The Awakening by Kate Chopin The Awakening by Kate Chopin – 4****
During another summer spent with her husband and children on Grande Isle, LA, Edna Pontellier awakens to the realization that she has stifled the person inside her. I could not help but think about Edith Wharton’s House of Mirth as I read this novella. I see so many parallels between Lily Bart and Edna. The novella unfolds slowly, with limited dialogue, but a vivid sense of place. I enjoyed every minute of it.
Link to my full review: https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...


message 6: by Louise (new)

Louise Haha, alright, I'll forgive you the lack of Harry Potter then. I imagine it's a very different reading experience for someone who hasn't grown up with it (I started them when I was…9 I think, and Harry and I finished secondary school in the same year - it was beautiful).

To Kill a Mockingbird is fantastic though. good choice! I finally got around to reading it a few years ago and absolutely loved it.


Also, yeah, good call on skipping Angus, thongs etc. etc. - fun enough when you're 11 and there's not much else to read at your friend's house, less fun when you're any older than that.


message 7: by Martha (new)

Martha (marthas48) | 860 comments Mod
I will probably skip angus, etc if I haven't already. TKAM is my favorite book also. I haven't read it that many times, but I do live it and am ready for a reread. Still trying to convince my husband to read it. :-)


message 8: by Book Concierge (new)

Book Concierge (tessabookconcierge) | 414 comments Second substitution

#43. The Bible
Finished listening to the audio version of The Prince of Tides by Pat Conroy The Prince of Tides by Pat Conroy (Audio book performed by Frank Muller) – 3.5***
This is a story about a dysfunctional family and one man’s belated attempts to come to grips with the horrors of his childhood, and to find a way to become a better man despite all that he has endured. While Conroy’s prose can be poetic, intensely personal, funny, irreverent, and so evocative of place that you can smell the brine of a salt marsh, his plotting in this case is sometimes so over-the-top as to stretch credulity too far. I got the feeling the story got away from him. Frank Muller does a creditable job narrating the audio version of the novel.
Link to my full review: https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...


message 9: by Book Concierge (new)

Book Concierge (tessabookconcierge) | 414 comments #80. Scarlet Feather

Scarlet Feather by Maeve Binchy Scarlet Feather by Maeve Binchy – 3.5***
Binchy excels at writing ensemble pieces that show ordinary people in some extraordinary circumstances. This novel covers a year in the lives of Cathy Scarlet and Tom Feather and their new catering business, Scarlet Feather. They make mistakes, have emotional melt downs, overcome obstacles, find reserves of love and compassion, smile through adversity, and never stop working to achieve their dream. Each chapter covers a month in the year, but is divided into short vignettes jumping from character to character and scene to scene. The result is that the reader gets a more complete picture than any of the characters does.
Link to my full review: https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...


message 10: by Book Concierge (new)

Book Concierge (tessabookconcierge) | 414 comments Third Substitution

#54 A Milliion Little Pieces

A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court by Mark Twain
A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court by Mark Twain (Audio book performed by William Defris)– 3***
Hank Morgan, a 19th century machinist, wakes up to find himself in King Arthur’s England, A.D. 528. This is the story of his adventures and misadventures in that bygone era. Satire is not my favorite genre, but I enjoyed parts of this satire immensely. It seems clear to me that Twain was commenting on the current political and social situations of late 19th century America. He has Hank campaign against poverty, the prevailing class system and slavery. And campaign for better wages and literacy for a broader populace. I can clearly see how this has stood the test of time.
Link to my full review: https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...


message 11: by Book Concierge (new)

Book Concierge (tessabookconcierge) | 414 comments Fourth Substitution

#59 Atlas Shrugged

Brave New World by Aldous Huxley Brave New World by Aldous Huxley – Audiobook performed by Michael York – 4****
This is a classic science fiction novel in which Huxley imagines a future world that is focused on mass production, consumption, and a homogenous civilization. First published in 1932 this is a brilliant work of imagination. I was particularly struck by the focus on consumerism especially given that it was written during the Great Depression. This is not my preferred genre, but I was caught up in the world Huxley imagined and was interested in the characters and where the story would go. The audiobook is capably performed by Michael York.
Link to my full review: https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...


message 12: by Book Concierge (new)

Book Concierge (tessabookconcierge) | 414 comments # 49. The Outsiders

The Outsiders by S.E. Hinton The Outsiders by S E Hinton – Book on audio read by Jim Fyfe – 5*****
An extraordinary coming-of-age novel first published in 1967, when it touched a nerve in a generation eager for “relevant” literature. The narrator is 14-year-old Ponyboy, a member of a gang of greasers who frequently get into fights with the Socs (society kids from affluent homes). He wants desperately to be recognized for the individual that he is, not for the label attached to him. In the end the reader sees that adults are not always the enemy, “nice boys” can be cruel and hoodlums can become heroes. The audio book was capably performed by Jim Fyfe. He really brought Ponyboy, Johnny and the rest of the gang to life for me.
Link to my full review: https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...


message 13: by Book Concierge (last edited Aug 03, 2014 02:49PM) (new)

Book Concierge (tessabookconcierge) | 414 comments #3. Outlander

Outlander (Outlander, #1) by Diana Gabaldon Outlander by Diana Gabaldon – 4****
Audio book performed by Davinia Porter. What a rollicking good story! I had avoided it because of the time travel aspect, but I found it very entertaining. I do have several issues with the book. There are parts that are a tad too “bodice-ripper” for my taste. I also wasn’t too keen on the whole “I’ll beat you to punish you and then we’ll make mad passionate love” scenario. And I was irritated with Claire’s continued insistence on going off by herself only to have to be rescued by Jamie (or another strong man). Still, it held my interest and Davinia Porter’s performance on the audio is worth a star all by itself.
This is a Link to my full review: https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...


message 14: by Book Concierge (new)

Book Concierge (tessabookconcierge) | 414 comments FIFTH Substitution

88. The Fountainhead by Ayn Rand

A Town Like Alice by Nevil Shute A Town Like Alice by Nevil Shute – 5*****
A young English woman survives WW2 as a prisoner of the Japanese, and then finds her way to Australia and a new life. Nevil Shute is a wonderful story teller. I was engaged and interested from page one. Jean is a remarkable young woman – brave, intelligent, level-headed, and resilient. Joe Harman is a strong, quiet, resourceful young man. His steadfast belief in Jean, and hers in him, forms a solid basis for a strong and loving relationship. There is a fair amount of adventure in the story, and some horrific circumstances to be got through. But on the whole it is a quiet tale of a life well-lived.
Link to my full review: https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...


message 15: by Martha (new)

Martha (marthas48) | 860 comments Mod
I love Shute. Have you read Pied Piper? It's wonderful.


message 16: by Book Concierge (new)

Book Concierge (tessabookconcierge) | 414 comments Martha wrote: "I love Shute. Have you read Pied Piper? It's wonderful."

I haven't, Martha. I've read only On the Beach (which I gave 4 stars) and A Town Like Alice.


message 17: by Martha (new)

Martha (marthas48) | 860 comments Mod
PP is now my favorite Shute. I just love how he tells his stories. So simple, yet profound.


message 18: by Book Concierge (new)

Book Concierge (tessabookconcierge) | 414 comments SIXTH Substitution

#100 - Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte

I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings by Maya Angelou I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings by Maya Angelou - 5*****
This is the first memoir in a series of six which together formed Angelou’s autobiography. In this work she chronicles her childhood from about age three to age 17. This is a wonderfully told first-hand account of a young woman’s coming of age, as well as of the changes brought about in the country from 1930-1945. She was an extraordinary woman, and this is an extraordinary memoir.
Link to my full review: https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...


message 19: by Book Concierge (new)

Book Concierge (tessabookconcierge) | 414 comments #95 - on the list

Swallows of Kabul by Yasmina Khadra The Swallows of Kabul by Yasmina Khadra – 4****
This short novel follows two couples in a Taliban-run Kabul. Khadra writes with poetic detail about a city which the residents no longer recognize as their own. They struggle to make sense of a culture that is at once familiar and foreign. This is a tragedy, and things will not end well for all these characters. But I feel that I have gained a little understanding of the situation by reading this novel, and for that I’m grateful.
Link to my full review: https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...


message 20: by Book Concierge (new)

Book Concierge (tessabookconcierge) | 414 comments #6 on the list (and a re-read for me)

1984 by George Orwell 1984 by George Orwell – 4****
Classic dystopian science fiction, written in 1948 and imagining a totalitarian society where Big Brother watches your every move and the ruling party controls all information. The thing that I find most frightening about this world that Orwell created is how very plausible it is. I couldn’t help but think of current events – torture, “Newspeak,” wars, video cameras on every corner, texting and hackers no longer respecting anyone’s privacy. Frank Muller does a fine job narrating the audiobook. The scenes where Winston is being re-educated gave me goose bumps.
Link to my full review: https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...


message 21: by Book Concierge (last edited Feb 05, 2015 09:57AM) (new)

Book Concierge (tessabookconcierge) | 414 comments #33 on the list

A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens – 4****
This is a classic tale of resurrection and redemption set against the backdrop of the French Revolution. It wouldn’t be Dickens without a huge cast of supporting characters, several twists in the plot, secret identities, unexpected connections, and long discourses wherein the characters expound on various issues, while the reader is anxious for the action to continue. But don’t let that dissuade you. It’s a marvelous story and the last hundred pages just flew by for me. Frank Muller does a wonderful job performing the audio book.
Link to my full review: https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...


message 22: by Book Concierge (last edited Feb 14, 2015 01:17PM) (new)

Book Concierge (tessabookconcierge) | 414 comments #1 is Anne of Green Gables, which I've previously read. I'm up to # 3 in the series now ...

Anne of the Island (Anne of Green Gables, #3) by L. M. Montgomery Anne of the Island by L M Montgomery – 4****
I never read these books as a child, but I am certainly enjoying them now. Anne is a marvelously engaging character and the interactions of the college roommates seems spot on perfect for students of that age. Susan O’Malley does a fine job performing the audio book.
Link to my full review: https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...


message 23: by Book Concierge (new)

Book Concierge (tessabookconcierge) | 414 comments #79 on the list ...

Sabriel (The Abhorsen Trilogy, #1) by Garth Nix Sabriel by Garth Nix – 4****
What an extraordinary fantasy adventure! I love that Nix chose for the hero a young woman – Sabriel – who is smart, resourceful, courageous and determined, if inexperienced and sometimes rash. The plotting is wonderfully complex and full of danger. I don’t know if I’ll read any more in the series (this kind of fantasy is just not my genre of choice), but I’m glad I read this one. Tim Curry is nothing short of fantastic performing the audio version.
Link to my full review: https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...


message 24: by Book Concierge (new)

Book Concierge (tessabookconcierge) | 414 comments #4 on the list (re-read)

To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee – 5***** and a ❤
This is a singularly powerful novel that has touched generations of readers in the 50-something years since it was first published. It is a novel of personal integrity and courage, and shines a light on a particular time and place in America’s history. The characters, even the minor ones, are richly drawn; Lee peoples this small town with a wide range of personalities, strength, weaknesses and ethics. My favorite book of all time. Sissy Spacek capably narrates the audio version.
Link to my full review: https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...


message 25: by Book Concierge (new)

Book Concierge (tessabookconcierge) | 414 comments # 73 on the list

Murder Must Advertise (Lord Peter Wimsey, #10) by Dorothy L. Sayers Murder Must Advertise by Dorothy L Sayers – 2.5**
Book #10 in the Lord Peter Wimsey mystery series. I’ve never read any of this series before, and though I see the potential (a likeable main character – witty, wealthy, smart, charismatic) I just wasn’t captivated by the story. It seemed to take forever to get interesting, and I was bored with much of it. I finished only because it fulfilled a book group challenge.
Full Review HERE


message 26: by Book Concierge (last edited Nov 18, 2015 12:51PM) (new)

Book Concierge (tessabookconcierge) | 414 comments # 58 on the list

Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy – 3***
Is there anyone who doesn’t know the basic storyline of Alexei Karenin, his wife Anna, and her lover Count Vronsky? Tolstoy’s novel explores much more than this love triangle, but this central story was what I found compelling. Too bad I had to wade through all that other stuff. Nadia May does an okay job of narrating the audio version. She does tend to “read” rather than perform but her pacing was good and her diction clear.
Full Review HERE


message 27: by Book Concierge (new)

Book Concierge (tessabookconcierge) | 414 comments # 42 on the list

Roots The Saga of an American Family by Alex Haley Roots: The Saga of an American Family by Alex Haley – 4****
Haley’s blockbuster history of his ancestors begins with the birth of a baby boy – Kunta Kinte – in a small African village in the Spring of 1750, and ends two centuries later in Arkansas. It’s a gripping tale and Haley is a great story teller. I was engaged from page one and found myself very interested in all aspects of the book. Haley’s narrative focuses on three of his male ancestors: Kunta Kinte, Chicken George, and Tom (Haley’s great-grandfather). Avery Brooks does a magnificent job narrating the audio book. He is an accomplished actor and really brings the characters to life. (5***** for his audio performance)
Full Review HERE


message 28: by Book Concierge (new)

Book Concierge (tessabookconcierge) | 414 comments # 60 on the list

Charlie and the Chocolate Factory (Charlie Bucket, #1) by Roald Dahl Charlie and the Chocolate Factory by Roald Dahl – 3***
A classic children’s story with a message about good behavior being rewarded. I never read it as a child and I found it a bit over-the-top, but I can see the great appeal that this kind of “fairy tale” holds for children. Eric Idle does a marvelous job of narrating the audio book. All his skill as a voice artist is put to good use creating unique characters. I’d give him 4 stars for his narration.
Full Review HERE


message 29: by Book Concierge (new)

Book Concierge (tessabookconcierge) | 414 comments # 26 on the list ...

Love You Forever by Robert Munsch Love You Forever by Robert Munsch – 1*
A mother’s love knows no bounds. As she rocks her infant son, cradled in her arms, she sings of her eternal love. It’s a lovely sentiment and certainly one that every child deserves to feel – safe and secure, knowing his mother will love him no matter what, and throughout his lifetime. But … There’s something vaguely disturbing about a mother who will crawl into her adult son’s bedroom to rock him as he sleeps…. I think other authors have dealt with this theme more successfully.
Full Review HERE


message 30: by Book Concierge (new)

Book Concierge (tessabookconcierge) | 414 comments # 89 on the list -

Journey to the River Sea by Eva Ibbotson Journey to the River Sea – Eva Ibbotson – 4****
Maia is an orphan in London, in the early 1900s who is sent to live with distant relatives on their rubber plantation in Brazil. What a lovely adventure / coming-of-age story! Maia is a strong female character – intelligent, kind, generous, brave, resourceful and loyal. I did think the Carter family – father, mother, and twins – were rather stereotypical “villains,” but that is a small quibble. This is a children’s book, after all, and I don’t expect the same subtleties that I would in literature written for adults.
Full Review HERE


message 31: by Book Concierge (new)

Book Concierge (tessabookconcierge) | 414 comments #18 on the list

Dracula by Bram Stoker Dracula – Bram Stoker – 5*****
Stoker wrote this as a series of journal or diary entries, letters and newspaper clippings. This gives a certain immediacy to the writing, and builds suspense. The novel is wonderfully atmospheric; from the delights of a new culture as Harker first experiences the loveliness of Eastern Europe, to the creepy, skin-crawling scene with the hordes of rats, and finally to the “pure-white” snow of the mountain blizzard, time and again Stoker puts the reader smack dab in the middle of the scenes. But the novel is more than just a horror story. There are several themes which would be great for book group discussion.
Full Review HERE


message 32: by Book Concierge (new)

Book Concierge (tessabookconcierge) | 414 comments Well, I managed to read five books from the list this year. So, if I've counted correctly, I've read 71 books from the list (although 4 were "substitutions")


message 33: by Martha (new)

Martha (marthas48) | 860 comments Mod
I'm still at 49 with some substitutions. At least 3 this year were rereads. LOL


message 34: by Book Concierge (new)

Book Concierge (tessabookconcierge) | 414 comments # 47 on the list

The Husband by Dean Koontz
The Husband - Dean Koontz – 3.5***
Mitch Rafferty runs a two-man landscaping business, so he’s sure there’s a mistake when a kidnapper calls and says that if he “loves his wife enough” he’ll find a way to pay the exorbitant ransom. This is the first book by Koontz that I’ve read. It’s not great literature, but it sure held my attention and I’ll definitely read more from him. Especially when I’m in the mood for a fast-paced, entertaining thriller.
LINK to my review


message 35: by Book Concierge (new)

Book Concierge (tessabookconcierge) | 414 comments # 66 on the list

 Exodus  by Leon Uris
Exodus – Leon Uris – 3.5***
This is an epic novel covering the history of the Jewish people’s efforts to return to Palestine and form an independent state. I felt that Uris couldn’t make up his mind whether he was writing an epic romance, a war novel or a history of the formation of Israel. It certainly made me think. And I’m glad I finally read this novel.
LINK to my review


message 36: by Book Concierge (new)

Book Concierge (tessabookconcierge) | 414 comments # 67 on the list

Expecting Adam A True Story of Birth, Rebirth, and Everyday Magic by Martha N. Beck
Expecting Adam – Martha N Beck – 4****
3.5*** rounded up. The subtitle of this memoir is: A True Story of Birth, Rebirth, and Everyday Magic. Beck writes well, and she is very honest about what she went through. Her self-deprecating humor is refreshing, and a few scenes had me laughing out loud.
LINK to my review


message 37: by Book Concierge (new)

Book Concierge (tessabookconcierge) | 414 comments # 65 on the list

Eragon (The Inheritance Cycle, #1) by Christopher Paolini
Eragon - Christopher Paolini – 3***
This is # 1 in the Inheritance series. I am clearly not the target audience for this fantasy novel. However, kudos to Paolini for creating this complex world, with many characters and beings, mythology, history, diverse landscape and complex social structure. I definitely see the appeal for the intended audience, even if it’s not really my cup of tea.
LINK to my review


message 38: by Book Concierge (last edited Dec 12, 2020 01:29PM) (new)

Book Concierge (tessabookconcierge) | 414 comments Oops ... seems I've forgotten to update

# 72

Lucky Jim by Kingsley Amis
Lucky Jim by Kingsley Amis - 1*
Maybe I’m too far past my college years. Perhaps it’s the dry British humor. Or the 1950s setting and writing style (first published in 1954). But I just don’t see the humor in this. I struggled to finish.
LINK to my review


message 39: by Book Concierge (new)

Book Concierge (tessabookconcierge) | 414 comments It's been quite a while since I looked at this list seriously, but I've really read quite a lot of them. I have 24 left on my list:


11.Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows by J.K. Rowling

30.The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe by C.S. Lewis

32.The Stone Angel by Margaret Laurence

41.On the Road by Jack Kerouac

45.The Golden Compass by Phillip Pullman

48.The Lizard Cage by Karen Connelly

61.Cirque de Freak by Darren Shan

63.David Copperfield by Charles Dickens

64.Deadly Appearances by Gail Bowen

68.Five Smooth Stones by Anne Fairbairn

69.Jack Maggs by Peter Carey

70.Jennie: The Life of Lady Randolph Churchill by Ralph Martin

75.Nineteen Minutes by Jodi Picoult

76.North and South by John Jakes

77.Not Wanted on the Voyage by Timothy Findley

82.Shadow of the Moon by M.M. Kaye

84.The Bourne Identity by Robert Ludlum

85.The Cure for Death by Lightning by Gail Anderson-Dargatz

86.The Englishman’s Boy by Guy Vanderhaeghe

94.The Shell Seekers by Rosamunde Pilcher

96.The Way the Crow Flies by Ann-Marie MacDonald

97.True History f the Kelly Gang by Peter Carey

98.What Came Before He Shot Her by Elizabeth George

99.Without Remorse by Tom Clancy


Melissa (ladybug) (ladybugsdoodles) | 193 comments Great Job! :)


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