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General Archive > Off-Topic: Films versus TV

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message 1: by Terry (new)

Terry Ravenscroft (terryrazz) | 10 comments Does anyone else feel, like I do, that the standard of the best TV drama series is now better than that of feature films? I am thinking particularly of American TV series such as Breaking Bad, The Sopranos, Mad Men, The Wire, Boardwalk Empire, which to my mind were vastly superior to anything Hollywood has turned out over the last few years.


message 2: by EleonoraF (new)

EleonoraF (eleonora1679) I liked a lot Breaking Bad, more than the last movies that I saw at the cinema. In addition, it seems to me that few original screenplays come out from Hollywood and many recent films are remakes (Frankestein, Hansel and Gretel, Spider, Superman etc.)


message 3: by Valetta (new)

Valetta | 33 comments I totally agree. The quality of Breaking Bad or The Game of Thrones, for example, is equal to that of some masterpieces seen at the cinema in the last years.
Both actors and producers feel this. In the past actors dreamt of making the great leap from the small to the big screen (like Clooney did) and artists who came back to tv after working in the cinema industry were considered at the end of their carrier. Now the opposite is true: many great actors look for roles in important tv shows, it is a form of recognition of their values and also producers are willing to spend higher budgets on promising tv shows.


message 4: by Leslie (new)

Leslie | 15985 comments Eleonora wrote: "I liked a lot Breaking Bad, more than the last movies that I saw at the cinema. In addition, it seems to me that few original screenplays come out from Hollywood and many recent films are remakes (..."

Yes, what is up with remaking, not great films of the past (which is a whole other discussion), but TV shows and comic strips from the 1950-70s?? I mean, I grew up watching "The Brady Bunch" but it isn't worthy of a feature film... and the film version of "The Avengers" was terrible!!


message 5: by Terry (new)

Terry Ravenscroft (terryrazz) | 10 comments Leslie wrote: "Eleonora wrote: "I liked a lot Breaking Bad, more than the last movies that I saw at the cinema. In addition, it seems to me that few original screenplays come out from Hollywood and many recent fi..."

I can't think of one TV show that has transferred with any degree of success to the big screen, with the exception of the South Park film. Certainly not the travesty that was The Flintstone's Movie!


message 6: by Robert (new)

Robert Spake (ManofYesterday) | 266 comments Leslie wrote: "Eleonora wrote: "I liked a lot Breaking Bad, more than the last movies that I saw at the cinema. In addition, it seems to me that few original screenplays come out from Hollywood and many recent fi..."

Hollywood has always been adapting existing materials. It's not a new thing at all. I don't know if you mean the adaptation of the British tv show Avengers or the Marvel film, but if you mean the latter then I think the vast majority would disagree with you.

But no, I don't think that the standard of television is inherently better than that of feature films. Just like any medium there is a vast range of quality across the spectrum.

As for tv shows being transferred successfully to the big screen - Star Trek would be the obvious example. The Inbetweeners movie was met with great success, as was The Simpsons, and the movie actually injected some freshness into the franchise. Mission: Impossible too.


message 7: by Leslie (last edited Feb 12, 2014 05:34AM) (new)

Leslie | 15985 comments Robert wrote: "Leslie wrote: "Eleonora wrote: "I liked a lot Breaking Bad, more than the last movies that I saw at the cinema. In addition, it seems to me that few original screenplays come out from Hollywood and..."

The Avengers I was referring to was the film based on the British TV show.

I suppose that the success of the Star Trek and Superman movies is one of the incentives for making this type of remake; the hope of hitting it big... I did enjoy those movies, and overall I think sci fi does better on the big screen (the special effects can carry more wow-factor).

My complaint is that it seems like there are so many of these being made now & based on some questionable TV series...


message 8: by Hales (new)

Hales | 314 comments I agree Leslie, there is certainly an air of money spinning when a TV series becomes a movie. That is why I am so glad that the cast and writers of Friends are not doing a feature film it would ruin it.

I must say I am (very unoriginally) on the fence about this, it really depends what mood I am in. Though there are some great tv shows out there at the moment and I agree that TV no longer has the stigma of 'failure' about it for actors.


message 9: by Noel (new)

Noel Brady (noel-brady) I have seen some fantastic movies of course, but I prefer television, because there is SO MUCH you can do when you have the advantage of long-term story-telling. You get to build characterization, explore different plots, have inside-jokes and running gags... You just can't get that in movies.

And maybe it's something to do with my brain, but I can sit through episodes much more easily than a whole movie. I will eagerly watch three 1-hour episodes, but a 3-hour movie makes me restless. Can easily be applied to books! How does chapter length affect your enjoyment of a book? Do you prefer short chapters?


message 10: by Alannah (new)

Alannah Clarke (alannahclarke) | 11550 comments Mod
I have noticed that every film I have seen lately were not great compared to older movies. I have preferred television considering how much it costs to see a film nowadays.


message 11: by Summerdale (new)

Summerdale In my opinion the movie industry today has to really scrape for an original story and the stuff that comes out that isnt a remake or sequel is a "wam, bam, thank you ma'am, shove as much stuff in as we can" type of deal so I focus on finding good shows. Character arc/development is a big thing for me. Watching Ben Linus or Walter White from start to finish was magical and, as Shannon said, you cant get that from a movie. I want to be more invested in the material. Also, I remember when the price I'm paying for a matinee now used to be the regular evening price of a theater ticket so I avoid the movie theater unless absolutely necessary. $5 for a coke? I smuggle candy and bottled water from the house in my purse. heh heh


message 12: by Michael (new)

Michael (micky74007) Can't afford to go to the movies. Last one my wife and I saw was Jersey Boys. She talked me into going to the Premier instead of the normal theater. Between $10 margaritas and $20 nachos, plus the elevated cost of the ticket, we spent close to $100!
The movie was really good. And we got free popcorn!
Going to see the stage production of Jersey Boys cost us about $120. But we didn't get the free popcorn.

Best transition from screen to tv: Mash.
I didn't expect the tv actors to match the performances of the screen actors, but I think they surpassed them. When I hear the theme song, I do not recall the movie--I recall the tv series.


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